Posts Tagged ‘job’

How to Solve OROP Problem – Integrated Pay Scale will eliminate need for One Rank One Pension

April 29, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: OROP IMBROGLIO – Simple Solution – HOW TO MAKE THE “OROP” PROBLEM DISAPPEAR.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

OROP IMBROGLIO – Simple Solution

HOW TO MAKE THE OROP PROBLEM DISAPPEAR
Ramblings of a Military Veteran
By
VIKRAM KARVE

In the Armed Forces – pay has traditionally been linked to rank.

In the 1980’s – the Armed Forces appreciated that it was not practicable to enhance the percentage of higher ranks given the steep pyramid hierarchy required for command and control in the Defence Services.

This meant that very few could be promoted to higher ranks – and most officers would be “passed over” and superseded for promotion and would retire at lower ranks (and at a younger age too).

Supersession is a fact of life in the Armed Forces.

And – since pay and pension was linked to rank – most officers are at a great monetary disadvantage for no fault of theirs.

In order to mitigate this – the 4th Pay Commission introduced the “Integrated Pay Scale” upto the Rank of Brigadier (Running Pay Band from 2nd/Lt to Brigadier: 2300 – 100 – 5100).

This “integrated pay scale” (or “running pay band”) worked well to give equitable pay to superseded officers and, to a certain extent, it helped mitigate the loss of morale due to supersession.

It is understood that the Defence Services had proposed to extend this “integrated pay scale” concept to all ranks right upto the top ranks of General/Admiral/Air Chief Marshal.

However, going by some specious logic, the 5th Pay Commission abolished this “running pay band” concept altogether – and we were back to square one where your rank determined your pay.

While abolishing this excellent “integrated pay scale” concept – the Pay Commission rubbed salt in the wounds of superseded officers by not giving Armed Forces the benefits of the Assured Career Progression (ACP) and Non-Functional Upgradation (NFU/NFFU) which were enjoyed by the civil services.

Since pension is based on “last pay drawn” – the problem of OROP will disappear of the concept of “integrated pay scale” is re-introduced for the Armed Forces.

The “integrated pay scale” can be applied with retrospective effect.

As per the “running pay band” – your Retirement Pay will be determined by your total years of service – which in turn will determine your pension.

This is a fair, ethical and equitable concept – rather than linking pension to rank alone.

“One Rank One Pension” (OROP) concept is unfair – since it links Pension to Rank.

OROP will mainly benefit High Ranking Officers.

Should “length of service” not be given more importance than rank while computing pension?

Who deserves more pension:– 

A Colonel with 35 years of service – or a Brigadier with 25 years of service…?

After retirement – financial needs are the same for military veterans.

It is logical, equitable and ethical to give pay and pension based on the years of active service rendered in the armed forces.

If the “integrated pay scale” concept of 4th Pay Commission is implemented by 7th Pay Commission for the Armed Forces – and given retrospective effect for the purpose of computing pension – then the OROP issue will automatically be solved – and also – it will be fair and equitable to all retired military veterans including superseded officers.

So – the simplest solution and panacea for the OROP imbroglio is to re-introduce the “integrated pay scale” concept of 4th Pay Commission.

If government wants the OROP problem to disappear – then all the government has to do is to re-introduce the “running pay band” concept of 4th Pay Commission for the Armed Forces in the 7th Pay Commission and give retrospective effect for the purpose of computing pension of defence personnel and military veterans.

Do you agree?

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Posted by Vikram Karve at 4/29/2015 10:26:00 AM

Changing Face of the “FAUJAN” (Military Wife) – Story of 4 “Fauji Memsahibs”

April 22, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: ARMY WIFE – THEN AND NOW : A TALE OF FOUR FAUJI MEMSAHIBS.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

THE NEW AGE “FAUJI MEMSAHIB”

Sometime back the Social Media was abuzz with news of a curious contretemps pertaining to AWWA (Army Wives Welfare Association) and this issue was reported in the media too (Link to report below):

Major’s wife threatens action for being forced to rehearse for a show

If you read the news report and peruse the numerous comments and views on the incident expressed by young army wives on the social media, especially twitter, it is evident the archaic feudal army social culture is not in sync with the aspirations of the new age army wife.

All this “humor out of uniform” reminded me of a blog post I had written a few months ago about the changing face of the “Fauji Memsahib”

I am posting the story once more for you to read:

ARMY WIFE – THEN AND NOW : A Tale of 4 “Fauji Memsahibs
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Story of 4 “Fauji Memsahibs”

ARMY WIFE NO. 1 – SHE HAD NO REGRET MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

1948   Army Bride

“There is a marriage proposal for you,” her parents say, the moment she returns home from college.

“I don’t want to get married,” she says.

“Do you want to remain a spinster all your life?” her mother asks.

“No. But let me finish my graduation. Then I’ll see,” she says.

“She has a point. Let her finish her graduation. It’s just a question of one year,” her father says.

“Yes, let me finish my graduation,” the girl says.

“What graduation? Your whole aim is to get married, isn’t it? The boy and his parents are not insisting on graduation. They saw you at the club last evening, they have liked you, the boy has liked you, and the proposal has come. And let me tell you one thing – you won’t find a more eligible bachelor than him. It will be top status match. He is an army officer and you know that army officers are in highest demand – he can get any girl he wants, and you will be very lucky to get a husband like him. We will all regret it if we let go an opportunity like this,” the mother says.

“Please don’t hurry me up. Let me meet the boy. I will talk to him. Maybe he will wait for one year till I finish my B.A. – maybe we can get engaged now and marry later,” the girl says.

“No. The boy cannot wait for one year. He has been selected to go abroad for a long training course in England. He is leaving next month and they want to get him married before he leaves so that he can take his wife along with him to England,” the mother says.

Her father interjects, “I have found out everything about the boy from my army friends. The boy is a fine officer and has a very bright future in the army. The family is very respectable and decent too. I think you should consider this proposal.”

Seeing the daughter confused, the mother says firmly, “Listen carefully. They want our answer by tonight – yes or no. There is bevy of girls lined up for him, so may girls are desperate to get married to him, and you will regret it all you life if you let this boy go.”

The girl nodded her acceptance.

He mother rang up the boy’s mother.

Next day, the boy and his parents came over to “see” the girl – notionally, the boy’s side still had the prerogative to “reject” the girl but then they had already seen her and liked her.

The girl got married to the army officer the next week. They went on a whirlwind honeymoon to Darjeeling, then to the army cantonment where the boy was posted, where there was a flurry of parties, and then they set sail for England.

The girl did not complete her graduation. There was no need for so much education – for she was going to be a full time army wife – a “memsahib”.

The girl did not regret her decision.

In fact, marrying an army officer was the best thing that happened to her.

Where else would she get the high status in society, the top quality lifestyle, and the comforts that she enjoyed as the wife of a General?

Yes, her husband had become a General and she was the “first lady” and she was proud to have contributed to his success as a perfect army wife.

She felt absolutely no regret that she had married an army officer.

In fact, marrying an army officer was the best decision of her life.


20 Years Later…


ARMY WIFE NO. 2 – SHE HAD A LITTLE BIT OF REGRET MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

1968   Army Bride

She was a budding lawyer with a lot of promise.

After her LL.B. she had begun her practice under the tutelage of a top-notch lawyer.

One day, she submitted her resignation and told him that she was giving up her law practice.

Her boss was aghast and demanded to know the reason for her inexplicable decision.

“Sir, I am getting married to an army officer,” she said.

“But why resign and give up your practice? You can continue to practice law even after marriage. You are so talented – you have a very bright future ahead of you – I am sure you will become a very successful lawyer and, who knows, you even may get the opportunity of being elevated as a judge,” he said.

“Sir, my husband will be posted all over as an army officer and I don’t want to live separately from him – in fact, he has made it quite clear that he wants me to accompany him wherever he goes,” she said, and quit her law career.

She enjoyed being an army wife, supporting her husband in his career, taking part in various social duties, the nomadic way of life, and cozy existence of cantonment life.

Later, as she saw that some of her classmates and erstwhile lawyer colleagues, who were much less accomplished than her, had become successful lawyers, and some had even become judges, and she felt a tinge of regret, for she had no identity of her own except that of being the wife of an army officer.

Yes, she did feel a bit of regret that she had married an army officer and sacrificed her own career.


20 Years Later…


ARMY WIFE NO. 3 – SHE HAD PLENTY OF REGRET FOR MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

1988   Army Bride

She was a qualified engineer who had specialized in computer and software engineering.

She got a job in the top pioneer software company and had settled down quickly in her career.

She got married to an army officer.

She had two choices:

Option 1

1. She could give up her career as a “Techie” and join her husband in the remote place where he was posted and then accompany him wherever he was posted. She realized that if she wanted to always be with her husband, as an army wife she would have to be either a homemaker or a teacher, the only feasible career in a cantonment.

Option 2

2. She could continue her career but have a “long distance marriage” with her army husband as he got posted all over.

She chose the second option. 

Yes, she chose Option 2 – she decided to pursue her career as a “Techie” and have a “long distance marriage”.

She did extremely well in her career.

Soon, she was way ahead of her “fauji” husband who was plodding along in the army.

In their entire married life, they spent just 3 years together when her husband managed a posting to her place of work.

Often, she felt lonely, as she missed her husband.

As she saw her fellow “techie couples” enjoy the bliss of married life, she was filled with regret that she was married only on paper.

Yes, she was married only on paper – in practice, her life was as if she was not married.

Loneliness proved corrosive for her army officer husband too, who took solace in alcohol.

Worse, the army officer husband developed an inferiority complex because his wife had done much better than him in life, career-success wise and money wise, as the prospects in the army were limited as compared to the software industry.

All this – the conjugal separation, her work pressures, compounded by her husband’s increasing melancholic attitude, took its toll on her too.

She regretted marrying an army officer.


20 Years Later…
                                                          

ARMY NOT-TO-BE-WIFE NO. 4 – SHE DID NOT WANT TO REGRET BY MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

2008   Not-to-be Army Bride

She was the ambitious daughter of an army officer – she was an “army brat”.

She studied economics from a premier college and then followed it up with an MBA from a top Business School, topping in both courses.

She had got a top-notch placement as an investment banker.

She was taken aback when her classmate from school suddenly proposed to her.

He was also an “army brat” who had joined the NDA as a cadet after school and was now an army officer.

The army officer told the investment banker that he was secretly in love with her and was waiting for her to finish her studies before he proposed.

“But I treated you as a friend,” she said.

“But for me you are much more than a friend – tell me – what’s wrong if we get married – we know each other since school,” he said.

“Are you crazy?” she said.

“Crazy? Why?” he asked.

“Why don’t you understand? You are just an army officer and I am an investment banker. I am out of your league now. Do you know the package I have been offered? In the army, I doubt you get even one-tenth of the salary and perks I get. See, don’t feel bad, but I have my dreams, my ambitions of making it real big – now I am heading for Hong Kong, after that I don’t know where I will go – so marrying an army officer just does not fit into my career plans – you understand, don’t you?” she told him, “I do not want to regret by marrying an army officer.”

The investment banker girl looked at the dejected army officer and said, “Will you mind if I give you some advice?”

“Go ahead,” the army officer said.

“If you want to be happy, you better find a wife within the army,” she said.

“What do you mean?” the army officer asked.

You should marry a female army officer. There are so many girls joining the army nowadays. So why don’t you find a bride in uniform – it will best for both of you.”

With these words she walked out his life.

So, the investment banker, the ambitious daughter of an army officer, the “army brat” – she did not want to regret by marrying an army officer.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This blog post is a is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)



Updated and Revised Version of my Article “THE CHANGING FACE OF THE ARMY WIFE” posted in my blog on 22 Jan 2014 First Posted by Vikram Karveat 01/22/2014 at url: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 8/10/2014 12:08:00 PM

ARE NRI CHILDREN ASSETS or LIABILITIES?

January 3, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: NRI CHILDREN – ASSET or LIABILITY?.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201… 

NRI CHILDREN – ASSET or LIABILITY?
Short Fiction – An Apocryphal Story
By
VIKRAM KARVE

My peer group comprises my classmates from school and college, my ex-navy and ex “fauji” military veteran buddies, and my friends, all in their late 50’s or early 60’s.

Whenever we meet, I realize that one notable fact pertaining to my peer group is that almost everyone has NRI children.

[I use the term NRI (Non Resident Indian) quite generically for all Persons of Indian Origin (PIO) settled abroad, including those who have adopted citizenships of their host countries]

At one such gathering, I met a friend – my school classmate.

She was an “NRI Mother” – or to put it correctly – she was the “mother of an NRI daughter”.

Her only child, a 27 year old married daughter, had settled down abroad in America with her husband.

“Nice to see you after a long time,” I said to my friend.

“Yes – I was abroad for almost one year – in the US,” she said.

“America? Wow!” I said.

“Last year, my daughter got pregnant – so she called me to America to look after her during her pregnancy days – and then, after her delivery, she wanted me to stay and look after the baby – so I stayed on there in the US for almost 6 months,” she said.

“Isn’t it our tradition that daughters come home, to their mother’s place, for their first delivery? Your daughter could have come here to Pune for her delivery,” I said.

“Are you crazy or something?” she asked.

“Why?”

“My daughter wanted her child to get US citizenship by birth. If the baby is born here in India, how will the baby get American citizenship?”

“Oh!” I said, “So you stayed there in America for 6 months after her delivery, did all the baby care, and then came back,” I said.

“Yes – but my daughter called me again for child-care “nanny” duties, till her baby was old enough for day-care, since she wanted to get back to work – it was important for her career that she started working as quickly as possible,” she said.

“So you went to America again?”

“Yes – for 6 months – till the baby was almost one year old,” she said.

“Oh – but now it is finally all over – and you’ll be staying here in Pune now…” I said.

“No – I am going again…” she said.

“You are going again to America…? Why…?”

“My daughter’s job is very hectic – so she wants me to do “nanny” duties and look after her child.”

“But your daughter’s child must be around one year old now – can’t the child be kept in a day-care centre?”

“I don’t know,” my friend said, “but my daughter insisted that I come because she wants her child to be looked after properly by me – so that the child imbibes our culture.”

“Culture…?” I said, astonished – and as I recovered my wits – I noticed that an old lady had walked over and joined us.

I knew the old lady – she was my friend’s mother.

I knew the old lady’s husband (my friend’s father) too.

My friend – their daughter – was their only child.

The old couple lived in a beautiful bungalow in the Lonavala – a picturesque hill station near Pune – and I had once visited them over there a few years ago.

I did not see the old lady’s husband around, so I asked the old lady, “How is uncle?”

“You don’t know…?” the old lady asked me.

“What…?”

“My husband died 3 months ago…” the old lady said.

“Oh – I am very sorry…”

“It’s okay – he was 84 years old – but he was absolutely fit till the last day. Though I miss him very much, one consolation is that he died when he was fit and healthy…” she said.

I did not say anything.

The old lady looked at me, and she said to me, “And by the way – I have shifted to an old age home…”

“Old Age Home…?” I asked, shocked.

“What to do…? I cannot live in that huge secluded bungalow all alone…” the old lady said.

“But why go to an old age home…? Why don’t you live with your daughter in Pune…?” I asked.

“Of course I would like to live with my daughter,” the old lady said, “given a choice, I certainly would not like to live in an old age home – but do I have a choice…?”

I did not say anything – I just kept looking at the old lady, not knowing what to say.

Seeing the confused look on my face, the old lady said, “Didn’t my daughter tell you? Her daughter, my granddaughter, has called her to America for babysitting and nanny duties – she will be away in America for 6 months – and then she may have to go back to America again and again – for the next delivery – and babysitting and nanny duties for the next child – so who is going to look after me here? I am 80 now – so it is better for me to live in an old age home…”

I looked at my friend, and wondered at her predicament.

On one side stood her recently widowed mother, pleading not to be sent to the old age home.

On the other side stood her daughter, beseeching her to come to America to take care of her baby.

She had a duty to look after her old widowed mother.

But she felt the strong pull of motherhood towards her daughter.

She was torn between her loyalty to her mother and her love for her daughter.

And in her case – her motherly love for the daughter had prevailed over her filial duty towards the mother.


EPILOGUE

Persons of my generation, in their 50’s and 60’s, who are parents of “NRI Children”, are in a Catch-22 situation.

They are expected to look after their parents, who may be in their 70’s and 80’s.

But their “NRI Children” also have “expectations” from them – especially from their mothers – during childbirth for “midwife” duties, and later, for baby care and surrogate parenting “nanny” duties.

That is why I often wonder:

Are “NRI Children” an asset or a liability?

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
This story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Posted by Vikram Karve at 1/03/2015 03:35:00 PM

CIVILIAN IN UNIFORM – “SUNDAY ROUTINE” – Unforgettable Memories of My Navy Life

November 23, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: “SUNDAY ROUTINE” – Unforgettable Memories of My Life in the Navy.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

“SUNDAY ROUTINE”
Unforgettable Memories of My Life in the Navy
By
VIKRAM KARVE

It is a bright Sunday Morning out here in Pune.

So, I think it will be apt to hark back to my halcyon Navy Days and tell you about the Navy “Sunday Routine”.

In the Navy, when you are at sea, you are on duty round-the-clock 24/7, and there is no “holiday” so there is no “Sunday Routine” in the true sense.

But when your ship is in harbour, you have “make-and-mend” (half day) on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and a “Sunday Routine” on Sundays and Holidays.

Unlike the corporate sector and government civilian babus, an operational organisation like the navy does not have the luxury of a “5 Day Week” – so we worked 6 days a week – and a weekly “off” only on Sundays – unless you were on OOD duty.

So, we eagerly waited for and coveted the “Sunday Routine”.

Once you retire, every day is a “Sunday Routine”.

But when we were in the Navy, and our ship was tied alongside in harbour, we looked forward to our Sundays, to enjoy what the Navy calls “Sunday Routine” – our well deserved leisure time.

“Sunday Routine” was our own personal time which we could spend as we liked and do as we pleased.

Aristotle has wisely said: “The end of labour is to gain leisure”

We laboured the whole week to gain our “Sunday Routine” and we were determined to enjoy our well earned leisure to the fullest.

Different individuals spend their leisure in different ways.

How you spend your leisure defines your persona.

If you want to find out the true character of a man, find out how he spends his leisure.

In the defence services, especially in the navy, how you spend your leisure mainly depends on where you are posted.

If you are lucky to be posted in a “maximum city” like Mumbai, there is a plethora of opportunities for enjoying your leisure.

On the other hand, if you are posted to a back-of-beyond remote desolate cantonment, your choices for spending your leisure are limited.

In Mumbai, you can enjoy the life of a “civilian in uniform” whereas military cantonments trap you into the straitjacket of “fauji” life, even on Sundays as avenues for leisure are limited.

Let me describe to you, to compare and contrast, two typical “Sunday Routines”, one in Mumbai, and one in Vizag, almost 10 years apart, both when I was posted on ships, the first in the latter half of the 1970’s and the second in the latter half of the 1980’s.


INS “XXX” (Harbour Sunday Routine – as an “in-living” officer)
Mumbai (then called Bombay) – end 1970’s

This was the happiest time of my life.

It is great to be on a happy ship.

Ours was a frontline warship – the ship was new, the crew was good, we had a delightful wardroom with friendly officers, and the general atmosphere on the ship was harmonious, and the main reason for all this was our Captain, who was a great guy. His credo was simple – all he demanded is that we do our jobs properly; beyond that, we were free to do whatever we pleased.

(I have observed during my long service in the navy and in inter-service establishments, that, particularly in the defence services, much depends on the Commanding Officer or the “Boss”, for creating a harmonious the atmosphere in a ship/unit)

On a Sunday we woke up early (remember I told you in an earlier article that I never had late nights on Saturdays and I preferred to have my hangovers on working days).

Then we embarked on a long Sunday morning walk cum jog – walking out of Lion Gate, past Kalaghoda, crossing the Oval, past CCI, then onto Marine Drive to jog to Chowpatty and back to Churchgate, where we picked up a copy of the Cole (for the day’s races).

Then, in the wardroom, we had a leisurely Sunday breakfast on board ship, of dosas and coffee, while “studying” the Cole and the racing columns in the newspapers.

Ours was a wardroom of “punters”.

At around 10 or 10:30 we were off again, walking down to our favourite Stadium Restaurant Churchgate, for a brunch of sumptuous “Kheema Pav” followed by a cup of invigorating Irani Chai, while discussing our “forecasts” and “predictions” for the day’s races.

Then we caught a local train to Mahalaxmi racecourse, so that we were well in time for the first race of the day, which began at noon, or sometimes a bit later at 12:30 or 1 o’clock in the afternoon.

(We took the precaution of buying a “return ticket” – for obvious reasons)

I loved going to the races. 

The atmosphere was electric – the bookie ring, the tote, the stands, the racecourse, the crowds, the excitement, the thrill – it was a thoroughly enjoyable Sunday afternoon.

In the evening, after a refreshing shower, and fortified with a generous quantity of Scotch and Soda, our hip flasks topped-up, we headed out again, for dinner and a late night movie followed by midnight ice creams or milkshakes.

Where we went for dinner depended on our luck at the races – either Olympia or Bade Miyan – or Gaylord or Kamling.

Even during the off-season, when there were no races, there was so much to do on a Sunday in a “maximum city” like Mumbai.

Like I said, those were the happiest days of my life, and my most enjoyable “Sunday Routines” too.

I thought these happy days would never end, but two years later, I was yanked off the ship, and posted to Jamnagar (as an instructor), and as I said, though I was familiar with the dreary place, it was still a big culture shock for me after my wonderful days in Mumbai.

After enduring a few months in that desolate place, almost becoming alcohol dependent, since the main leisure activity there was drinking Rum (while listening to old Hindi Songs on Urdu Service), I escaped by getting “selected” for a “prestigious” M. Tech. Course at IIT Delhi.

Two years of “paid holiday”, followed by two years in R&D, and then two years teaching at IAT Pune, and I was back on a frontline warship in Mumbai.

“Bombay days were back again”.

It was back to halcyon “Sunday Routine” days – I lived at Vasant Sagar in Churchgate – and for the first few months we had a great life.

As I was living it up, chanting “Happy Days are here again”, our luck ran out, and the base port of our ship was changed from Mumbai to Vizag, and we were off to the Eastern Seaboard.

I had been to Vizag only once on my earlier ship, but I did not see much of the Naval Base, since our ship was berthed on the iron ore jetty in the port trust, and we were there for just a day or so, and we spent our liberty hours ashore in the town.

But it seemed that, as far as the town was concerned, nothing much had changed in the last 10 years.

As compared to Mumbai, Vizag was a big comedown, as you will realize, when you see how I spent my “Sunday Routine” at Vizag (Visakhapatnam)
 

INS “YYY” (Harbour Sunday Routine – as an “MLR” officer)
Vizag (Visakhapatnam) – end 1980’s

I was now married (MLR or “Money in Lieu of Ration” in Naval Jargon) and living with my family in Naval Park Vizag.

Sunrise is early on the eastern seaboard, so I get up at 5:30 on Sunday morning and head for my Sunday morning super-long walk, up Dolphin’s Nose, down to Continental Beach, and then head back straight to the “Sunday Market” in the HSL complex near Scindia, reach there by 7 just as the market (haat) is opening up.

The entire naval community is there, mostly ladies whose husbands are sleeping off their hangover, and some early riser husbands like me.

In Vizag, this Sunday Morning Market is a “must visit” if you live far away from town in Naval Park, to pick up your weekly stock of vegetables, fruit and fish.

At around 8, I return home, I have a bath, we breakfast on the idlis I have brought from the Sunday market, and at 9 o’clock, we all settle down before the TV set to watch the epic serial Ramayan (later when Ramayan was over, we would watch Mahabharat from 9 to 10 every Sunday morning).

Then we (self, wife and son) head to the swimming pool and spend an hour swimming and cooling off and chitchatting with friends.

At 12 noon we are in the makeshift club located in the parking lot of the officers’ mess for the Sunday afternoon Beer Biryani Tombola.

(Yes, in Vizag it is Tombola at the Navy Club in lieu of Horse Racing at the Mahalaxmi Race Course which we enjoyed in Mumbai)

Then, I head back home for a “beer and biryani induced siesta”  which makes me feel groggy.

In the evening, maybe we head for town, full family of 3 on my Bajaj scooter, maybe accompanied by friends, and hang around Ramakrishna Beach, or maybe a movie at Jagdamba followed by dinner at Daspalla.

Then we head back home and hit the sack.

What a comedown from the glorious “Sunday Routines” of Mumbai.

One thing good in the Navy is that nothing is permanent.

So, 10 years later, in the year 2000, I am back in Mumbai, and now I enjoy my “Sunday Routines” even better than before, as the Navy gives me a lovely house in Empress Court, opposite the Oval, in Churchgate.

What better location can you ask for in Mumbai, especially to enjoy your leisure? 


EPILOGUE

I spent my most enjoyable “Sunday Routines” in Mumbai (Bombay) and Delhi.

And the most lackluster and dreary Sunday Routines were in Jamnagar, arguably the worst place to be posted to, during my younger days in the Navy.

The Sunday Routines in places like Vizag, Kochi (Cochin) and Pune were somewhere middle-of-the-road, as I have described above.

How about you? 

How do you like to enjoy your Sundays?

And especially if you are a “fauji”, do tell us how you enjoyed your “Sunday Routines” in the “fauj” – in the army, navy or air force.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


This is a re-post of my article First Posted by me Vikram Karve in my academic and creative writing journal blog at 7/08/2014 11:30:00 PM at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 11/23/2014 10:25:00 AM

 

OBIT – REQUIEM FOR A SOLDIER – In Remembrance of Brigadier Pratap Dattatraya Joshi (6.3.1932 – 22.9.2008)

September 22, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: “REQUIEM” FOR A SIMPLE HONEST PATRIOTIC SOLDIER ON HIS 6th DEATH ANNIVERSARY – OBITUARY – In Remembrance of Brigadier Pratap Dattatraya Joshi (6.3.1932 – 22.9.2008).

Click the link above to read the blog post in my academic and creative writing journal.

Article also posted below for your convenience:

“REQUIEM” FOR A SIMPLE HONEST PATRIOTIC SOLDIER ON HIS DEATH ANNIVERSARY

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

OBITUARY – In Remembrance of Brigadier Pratap Dattatraya Joshi (6.3.1932 – 22.9.2008)

Today is the 22nd of September 2014  the sixth death anniversary of my late father-in-law Brigadier Pratap Dattatraya Joshi who we affectionately called “Daddy“. 

How time flies! 

He passed away in the early hours of 22 September 2008.

Six years have passed since the inimitable Pratap Dattatraya Joshi left for his heavenly abode. 

Lest we forget him, on this day, his 6th death anniversary, let me sound the “Last Post” once again.



As a token of my remembrance, here is the obituary LAST POST I wrote for him when he left us for his heavenly abode on the 22nd of September 2008.

LAST POST

Obituary

Brigadier Pratap Dattatraya Joshi  (6.3.1932 – 22.9.2008)

In the early hours of the 22nd of September 2008, Pratap Dattatraya Joshi, breathed his last, and departed for his heavenly abode, at the Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital in Pune.

Pratap Joshi was an epitome of simple living and high thinking. 

Born on the 6th of March 1932, he imbibed sterling values from his father, DP Joshi, a Teacher and Scout, a legend in his lifetime.

Brigadier PD Joshi was a product of the prestigious First Course of the National Defence Academy (NDA – or 1st JSW, as he liked to call it, then located in Dehradun).

Brigadier PD Joshi was certainly not the archetypal pompous hard-drinking handlebar-moustachioed high-falutin “Colonel Blimp” type of Army Officer.

He was not an elitist snob, but a simple honest patriotic professional who believed in grassroot soldiering. 

He was a simple, down-to-earth, Spartan, unassuming, dedicated, sincere, patriotic, scrupulously honest, erudite person possessing a golden heart filled with humility and compassion. 

Throughout his distinguished career spanning 37 years, and even thereafter, he spread happiness, benevolence and goodwill owing to his cheerful disposition, kind-hearted nature and inimitable sense of humour.

Forever young at heart, Pratap Joshi did not suffer from the Auld Lang SyneComplex. 

After retirement, unlike most retired “faujis”, he never lived in the past, languishing and brooding about the “good old days”, but he moved on with exceptional enthusiasm and childlike zeal to his new loves – music and social work.

Starting from the scratch, he studied classical music with sheer dedication, resolute grit and passionate zest for many years till he was bestowed with the prestigious post graduate degree of Sangeet Alankar. 

Then he taught music to one and all, free of cost, making special efforts to teach the needy and underprivileged.

Travelling extensively, and roughing it out in the heart of the mofussil, to rural and far flung regions, he made a significant social contribution to enhancing primary education in backward areas, as the Chief Trustee of the Natu Foundation Educational Trust. 

He eagerly contributed his expertise to Jnana Prabodhini and for improving the efficiency of Hospitals.

Pratap Joshi loved animals, especially dogs. 

He always had pet dogs, and showered his unconditional love on them and all the dogs that he came across in the neighbourhood, pet and stray. 

It was distressing to see Dolly desperately searching for him soon after he had gone away from us forever. 

We shall always remember the love with which he snuggled and cuddled Sherry, our pet dog, a “Doberman-X” girl, when she was a baby.

He had a genuine zest for living, and enjoyed every moment of his life, indulging himself in his favourite foods, movies, travel, music – anything he liked, he did it! 

He laughed, and made others laugh.

I first met Pratap Joshi in March 1982 and he left such a lasting impression on me that I became his fan ever since. 

He was my father-in-law, more like a loving father who I could count on to stand by me, advise and inspire me, in happiness and in adversity, and I shall forever cherish every moment I shared with him. 

My son, a seafarer, was his favourite grandchild, the apple of his eye. 

It was a pity he could not be with his beloved grandfather during his last moments as he is sailing on the high seas. 

Such are the tragedies and travesties of life, and death.

We will miss you dearly “Daddy”. 

You lived your life to its fullest and loved all of us from the bottom of your heart. 

We are sure you will shower us with your blessings from your heavenly abode. 

You were a noble and virtuous man who always did good to everyone you met and wherever you went. 

Pratap Dattatraya Joshi  (6.3.1932 – 22.9.2008) – RIP.

May His Soul Rest in Peace.


VIKRAM KARVE

Obituary First Posted on 22 September 2008 in my Blog at url link:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/200…

LOOKING AFTER MILITARY VETERANS and WAR WIDOWS : EX-SERVICEMEN’S WELFARE

July 29, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: EX-SERVICEMEN’S WELFARE.

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2014/07/ex-servicemens-welfare.html

Click the link above to read the original article

Article also posted below for your convenience:

EX-SERVICEMEN’S WELFARE
LOOKING AFTER MILITARY VETERANS
Ramblings of a Retired Veteran
By
VIKRAM KARVE
It has become a fashion for Military Officers to blame Civilian Bureaucrats for the problems faced by ex-servicemen (Retired Military Veterans).
Why can’t the Military look after its own Veterans?
Why can’t each Defence Service Chief take on the responsibility to look after the welfare of Veterans of his own service?
(The Army Chief can look after his retired armymen, the Navy Chief can care for his retired navymen and the Air Chief can do likewise in respect of retired air-warriors)
Why have Senior Military Officers in Service Headquarters “passed the buck” of ex-servicemen’s welfare to Civilian Bureaucrats in the Ministry of Defence?
Instead of assuming responsibility for the care and welfare of their own veterans, why has the military “outsourced” ex-servicemen’s welfare to the civilian bureaucracy?
Metaphorically, it is like modern day children who “pass the buck” of looking after their parents to “old age homes”.
In the same way, are serving military officers (“children”) passing the buck of looking after their own retired veterans (“parents”) to civilian bureaucrats (“old age homes”)?
If you want to evade responsibility of looking after your own veterans and if you “outsource” this task to someone else, then you have no choice but to accept how that someone else (to whom you have passed the buck) treats your veterans.
 
Instead of constantly carping about the neglect of military veterans (ex-servicemen), would it not be better if the military accepts total responsibility of ex-servicemen’s welfare and looks after the welfare of its own veterans?
 
 
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

HOW TO MANAGE YOUR ONLINE REPUTATION

September 16, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: ONLINE REPUTATION MANAGEMENT.

Click the link above to read the article in my journal

The article is also posted below for your convenience:

BUILDING YOUR WEB IDENTITY AND MANAGING YOUR ONLINE REPUTATION
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Link to my original article in my journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/09/online-reputation-management.html

ONLINE REPUTATION MANAGEMENT
Tips for Building and Managing Your Web Identity
By
VIKRAM KARVE
In today’s world you have two reputations:
1. OFFLINE REPUTATION (in the physical real world)
2. ONLINE REPUTATION (in the virtual world or cyberspace)
Unless you are a celebrity, your “offline reputation” is restricted and known to only those persons in your proximity, at work, in your social circles and personal life.
However, your “online reputation” is all pervasive and is available for scrutiny by anyone throughout the world who has access to the internet.
If I want to know about you, all I have to do is to “google” your name or search your details on websites, search engines or social networks.
Potential employers, or prospective spouses, or those desirous of getting into a relationship with you, can easily carry out a basic background check on you by just surfing the internet.
(Earlier, before the advent of the internet, you had to ask some mutual acquaintance or make discreet inquiries or hire a detective to find out information about somebody)
The fact of the matter is that, in today’s connected world, your online reputation is easily accessible and matters more than offline reputation.
In the same way that your personality (real-world offline identity) is important for your offline reputation, your online identity plays an important role in determining your online reputation.
ONLINE IDENTITY
Your online identity consists of two things:
1. What you say about yourself on the internet (your “Owned Identity”)
2. What others say about you on the internet (your “Earned Identity”)
Your OWNED IDENTITY comprises whatever information you upload on the internet.
Your owned identity will comprise so many things like:
1. Whatever you upload on social networking sites like Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter etc including your profiles, pictures, photos, status reports, tweets, comments – anything and everything you upload about yourself.
2. Your Blogs
3. Your Websites (personal, professional and company)
4. All your writings and postings on the web which you post on the internet on various websites, online journals and e-magazines, forums, networks, groups, emails, documents, presentations – anything and everything you put on the internet.
5. Various “profiles” and “avatars” you create on the web – like, for example, your profiles on job search sites and matrimonial sites.
To put it metaphorically, your owned identity is like having a permanent tattoo – it can never be fully erased.
Your EARNED IDENTITY is what others “say” about you on the internet.
Your earned identity includes:
1. Information about you on Social Networking Sites like postings about you on Facebook by your friends (status, tags, pictures, photos, comments), recommendations and endorsements on LinkedIn, Re-tweets and Mentions of your Tweets etc
2. Articles, Blog Posts, Wikis, Biographical Writings etc written about you which are available on the internet
3. Various “profiles” created by others about you at various places on the web.
4. Various networks and websites that link to you
5. Miscellaneous information about you available on the internet – for example, your examination results uploaded online by your university, education board, UPSC etc or results of job selection interviews promulgated online.
To use a metaphor, your earned identity is like “branding” where a permanent mark is stamped on you by someone else.
ONLINE REPUTATION
Your “owned identity” is in your control.
You must be circumspect about what you put on the internet as even a small slip-up like an injudicious writing, indiscreet photo, imprudent relationship status update or careless comment has the potential of harming your reputation in future.
Your “earned identity” is not in your control.
Sometimes, this matters more, since people may be curious to find out what others have to say about you than what you say about yourself.
Even if you avoid the internet altogether, you cannot avoid having an “earned identity” since someone else may upload some writing or material about you on the web, especially if you are a celebrity.
That is why famous people, like ancient philosophers and writers, who lived much before the advent of internet have “earned identities” and consequent “online reputations”.
MANAGING YOUR ONLINE REPUTATION
Do a simple experiment.
Just “google” your name and see the results of the search.
What are the top few results?
How many are “owned reputation” and how many are “earned reputation”.
If you want to manage your online reputation you must ensure that links pertaining to “owned reputation” (what you say about yourself) appear as the top search results as compared to “earned reputation” (what others say about you).
As far as your online reputation is concerned, what you say about yourself (owned reputation) must have more prominence than what others say about you (earned reputation).
In a nutshell, if you want to control your online reputation, you will have to “say” more about yourself on the internet than others “say” about you.
How do you do this?
It is simple.
Get active on the internet – blog regularly, tweet vigorously, and maintain a dynamic presence on social networking sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Quora etc and various Forums and groups, and make sure you network effectively.
You must be conscious of your online reputation because with the proliferation of the internet, your “online reputation” will overshadow your “offline reputation”.
Remember, if someone wants to do a background check on you, for whatever reason, to hire you for a job, to check you out as a marriage prospect, or they just want to find out more about you, all they have to do is to “google” your name, ingeniously delve a bit and explore your online identity (web shadow) and discover your online reputation – yes, all that will matter is your online reputation.
It is, therefore, imperative that you establish an effective web presence and be careful to build a good online reputation and make constant efforts to monitor and manage your online reputation.
 
VIKRAM KARVE 
Copyright © Vikram Karve
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work.

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
NB:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve – all rights reserved
 
Did you like this blog post?

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To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
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COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramkarve@hotmail.com and vikramwamankarve@gmail.com
Twitter: @vikramkarve
      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Posted by Vikram Karve

HOW TO CONDUCT INTERVIEWS – FIVE QUESTIONS YOU MUST ASK THE INTERVIEWEE

June 23, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: HOW TO CONDUCT CAMPUS PLACEMENT INTERVIEW – FIVE QUESTIONS YOU MUST ASK THE INTERVIEWEE.

click the link above and read the article in my journa;

OFFICER LIKE QUALITIES aka OLQ and HUMOUR IN UNIFORM

April 24, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: HUMOUR IN UNIFORM – ARMY SENSE OF HUMOR.

Click the link above to read my original article in my journal

The Article is also posted below for your convenience to read:

HUMOR IN UNIFORM
A Hilarious Army Recruitment Advertisement

IF YOU WANT TO HAVE BEAUTIFUL AND SUCCESSFUL DAUGHTERS JOIN INDIAN ARMY

Link to my Original Article in my Journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/04/humour-in-uniform-army-sense-of-humor.html

HUMOR IN UNIFORM
ARMY SENSE OF HUMOUR
A Laugh on Monday Morning 
By
VIKRAM KARVE
Disclaimer: Please read this only if you have a sense of humour. This is a spoof. So first convince yourself that you have a sense of humour and only then read the yarn and have a laugh.
I thought the Navy was witty, but I must say that the army has a great sense of humour.
I have seen many recruitment advertisements with catchy slogans aimed at attracting the right kind of youth to a career in the Defence Services (Army Navy and Air Force).
When we were students the most popular army recruitment advertisement had a rather prosaic yet effective slogan which appealed to your patriotic sentiment:
JOIN THE ARMY AND SERVE THE NATION
This simple slogan made it very clear what type of officers and soldiers the army was looking for.
The army wanted to attract youth inspired with a sense of patriotism – young men who wanted to dedicate their lives in the service of the nation.
In those “good old days” an army officer was required to put service before self and live up to the Chetwode Motto:
“The safety, honour and welfare of your Country come first, always and every time.
The honour, welfare and comfort of the men you command come next.
Your own ease, comfort and safety come last always and every time”
And so the army recruitment slogan was in sync with this paramount OLQ requirement.
( OLQ is the acronym for “Officer Like Qualities” )
The Navy had its own slogans too.
Those days a popular navy recruitment advertisement had the slogan:
JOIN THE NAVY AND SEE THE WORLD
(Now you know why I preferred the navy to the army, though in hindsight I realize that I have hardly seen much of the world especially in comparison to my merchant mariner son who has travelled round the globe sailing across all oceans and seas and seeing all continents)
Recruitment advertisements were designed depending on what type of person the army wanted to attract to recruit as an officer or a soldier.
The recruitment slogan encapsulates in a nutshell the cardinal OLQ (“Officer Like Quality”) desired at that point of time.
Thus, the slogan “Join the Army and Serve the Nation” clearly implied that patriotism was the most important OLQ.
OLQ (or what are considered “Officer Like Qualities”) keep changing as the army ethos and value system tries to keep in tune with the changing social culture and situational ethics.
Accordingly, as the concept of OLQ changed from time to time, in order to attract the matching type of youth to join the army, the army came up with a variety of recruitment slogans emphasizing on and appealing to different human sentiments – adventure, bravery, masculinity, honesty, sacrifice, social status, quality of life, sports and recreation facilities, salary and perks, financial security, material benefits etc
Yes, with the progress of time, change in ethos and value system is inevitable and the meaning of OLQ too will accordingly change to keep in sync with social mores.
Like I said, I thought the navy was witty, but I was stunned when I came across this bizarre army recruitment slogan:
IF YOU WANT TO HAVE BEAUTIFUL AND SUCCESSFUL DAUGHTERS JOIN INDIAN ARMY
I chanced upon this gem of wit on twitter. It was a photograph of a hoarding apparently carrying an army recruitment advertisement. The advertisement had pictures of Bollywood Actors and Celebrities, who are daughters of army officers, with a caption that reads: “If you want to have beautiful and successful daughters, join Indian Army”
Some persons had clicked snapshots and photos of the hoarding featuring this colourful army recruitment advertisement and uploaded the pictures on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and soon this picture had gone viral on twitter.
In due course, this was picked up by the mainstream media and duly reported in newspapers and TV news channels.
There are many reasons to join the Army, but this one takes the cake: “Join the Army if you want to have beautiful and successful daughters?” – what a fascinating and incredible reason!
I wonder what type of officer material the army is trying to attract and what is the new meaning of the term OLQ?
Well, I have not seen this advertisement myself, so I will not post it here. You may have seen it (and read about it) in the mainstream media or on the social media or on the internet.
If you haven’t, here is are some links to reports and picture of the advertisement in the mainstream media (click the links below which will open in a new window):
(And hey, after seeing the pictures and reading the news-reports, please remember to come back here and continue reading my blog)
DNA Newspaper : Thursday, Apr 18, 2013
India Today Online
As I write this I cannot stop laughing.
“If you want to have beautiful and successful daughters, join Indian Army”
I have not seen a more hilarious army recruitment slogan than this one.
Have you?
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 
NB:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013. All Rights Reserved


Did you like reading this blog post?
I am sure you will like all the 27 stories in my book  COCKTAIL an anthology of Short Fiction.
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:

http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html

COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramwamankarve@gmail.com
Twitter: @vikramkarve
      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
Posted by Vikram Karve 

ARMY OFFICER or BEAUTY QUEEN – IS IT PROPER FOR WOMEN ARMY OFFICERS TO TAKE PART IN BEAUTY PAGEANTS

April 11, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: SHOULD ARMY OFFICERS TAKE PART IN BEAUTY CONTESTS.

Click the link above to read my original article in my journal.

The article is also posted below for you to read and for your convenience:

 

IS IS PROPER FOR LADY ARMY OFFICERS TO PARTICIPATE IN BEAUTY CONTESTS

Link to my Original Article in my Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/04/should-army-officers-take-part-in.html

SHOULD ARMY OFFICERS TAKE PART IN BEAUTY CONTESTS
Musings of a Veteran
By
VIKRAM KARVE
Is it proper for an Army Officer to be crowned a Beauty Queen?
Should Army Officers take part in Beauty Pageants?
These are the thoughts perambulating in my brain ever since I saw a poster inviting Lady Army Officers to take part in the May Queen Beauty Contest being held at the local institute.
Let me tell you that I am not against beauty contests. In fact, when I was in the navy, I used to eagerly look forward to the Navy Queen Contest held annually during the Navy Ball. This beauty pageant was a most prestigious event, next only the Miss IndiaContest, and was a launching pad for aspirants who wanted to enter the dazzling world of glamour, fashion and showbiz. This celebrated Beauty Pageant was open to all but I do not recall a Naval Officer participating in the Navy Queen Contest.
You may argue that whatever an officer does in off-duty hours is her personal affair and it is none of the army’s business to interfere in an officer’s personal life.
This may be true in civilian life but it is not so in the army.
In civilian workplaces there may be no personal relationship between a boss and his subordinates outside the office.
In the army, an officer is on duty at all times 24/7.
The army is not a mere “9 to 6 five-day-week” job like in the civilian world.
The army is not a job. The army is a way of life.
In the army the unique command relationship between officers and soldiers is omnipresent and omniscient.
In an army unit, an officer is being observed round-the-clock by the men under her command. (It is the same in the navy, on a ship).
The officer must be “seen” to be proper at all times since any indiscretions will be immediately noticed by the troops.
In such a situation, an army officer does not have a personal life.
The army has traditionally been a male bastion. Even today, after the induction of women officers, all the soldiers are men. The fact that the majority of soldiers are drawn from predominantly rural stock creates a unique situation for the female officer.
That is why an officer has to be very careful of her conduct and decorum at all times lest she send a wrong message which can be misinterpreted by her troops resulting in loss of respect and degradation of moral authority.
Owing to the conservative culture in the army, especially the orthodox mindset the soldiers, extreme care needs to be exercised by a lady army officer in order to ensure that her body language is not open to misinterpretation. Deliberate, or even unintentional, flaunting of your physical assets which can be perceived as trying to attract the attention of the opposite gender may lead to undesirable consequences.
In the army, perceptions do matter, and it is very important for a female officer to maintain a proper “soldierly” image in front of her troops.
Soldiers must not visualize their women officers as “eye candy”.
Probably, this is the reason why women officers are advised to de-glamorize themselves, especially in the presence of their troops.
When women were inducted in the navy in the 1990’s, I recall that some guidelines were issued to newly joined female officers that in case they wished to use cosmetics they must avoid looking “flashy” and their facial make-up must be worn conservatively and without being conspicuous.  Titivation like the use of false eyelashes, heavy eyeliner, brightly coloured eye shadow, coloured nail polish and excessive facial make-up was to be avoided and, if at all they wanted to use lipstick, then only transparent lipstick was to be used.
In matters of dress also, sobriety was advised. Lady officers were advised to take care that their dress was not provocative. Specifically, dresses revealing the navel and cleavage were not to be worn. Flimsy transparent clothes were not to be worn, especially in social functions. Extreme care was to be exercised by lady officers to ensure that their body language is not open to misinterpretation. Deliberately flaunting your physical beauty and dressing in a way designed to attract undue attention of the opposite gender was to be avoided.

A beauty pageant, or beauty contest, is a competition that mainly focuses on the physical beauty of its contestants.
Winners of beauty contests are often called beauty queens.
A Beauty Contest is a “pageant” – a spectacle, a show, a beauty parade.
Army Officers are trained to display their soldierly deportment in military parades as a part of their profession.
Then, is it right for Army Officers to flaunt their glamour and make a spectacle of themselves in “beauty parades”?
Is it proper for Female Officers to parade on the stage flaunting their bodies in skimpy clothes showing off their enticing sensuality and physical assets in a beauty contest in front of an audience which may include the soldiers under their command?
Tell me, if you are an officer, which of the two things below will enhance your reputation and stature amongst your troops:
1. Impressing your troops by displaying military bearing on the parade ground
or
2. Titillating the men under your command by titivating and flaunting your ravishing sex appeal on the stage
As mentioned earlier, soldiers are mainly recruited from the rural areas where traditional old-fashioned social mores may still be patriarchal and feudal in nature.
Owing to their background, soldiers are likely to have a conservative and orthodox mindset.
These simple soldiers may get flummoxed by the culture shock of seeing their “madam sahib” as a tantalizing beauty sashaying on the stage making an exhibition of her attractiveness in front of everyone like a glamorous showgirl.
An army unit is an intimate closed society, like a ship.
That is why you cannot hide anything and nothing remains secret in an army unit (or ship).
In the army, officers are in close contact with their troops.
Soldiers are present everywhere.
Even in non-working hours, soldiers are omnipresent everywhere performing various sundry duties in officers messes and institutes and employed as batmen (sahayaks) in an officer’s personal living quarters.
Thus, a number of soldiers are bound to be present during the beauty pageant and they will be most eagerly watching the fascinating spectacle of gorgeous women parading on the stage.
The “hot” news that their “glamorous” officer paraded herself in a beauty pageant will immediately buzz throughout the unit (with salt, pepper and spices added) and electrify the grapevine.
This may have undesirable consequences, especially for the discipline of the unit, as the next morning the troops may greet the officer with unseen sniggers, derisive sneers and snide jeers behind her back.
The soldiers will start looking at the “beauty queen” officer as an object and the officer will surely lose respect in the eyes of her troops.
An officer must not let herself be degraded to the status of an object.
An officer must always maintain high moral ground as perceived by her troops.
Moral ascendancy begets willing obedience and is the key ingredient in the recipe for effective command of men.
Once you lose moral authority you cannot exercise genuine command over your troops.
That is why at all times you must conduct yourself in a befitting manner and engage in appropriate activities so that you inspire confidence in your troops of your capabilities and leadership abilities.
In India there is no compulsory conscription and you join the army out of your own free choice.
But you must remember that the army is not like any other job – the army is a unique way of life which entails certain restrictions and demands its own high standard of conduct and stringent obligations.
In the civilian world, for example, if you say “woman entrepreneur” the emphasis is on “woman”.
But in the army if you say “woman officer” the emphasis is on “officer”.
In the army the gender of the individual does not make a difference.
If you are an aspirant for a career in the dazzling and glamorous world of showbiz and fashion, then a beauty pageant is certainly a good stepping stone to catapult you into a career as a fashion model, movie star or media celebrity.
In contrast, if you are a young woman who wants to join the army, you must realize that the army is a profession of arms. The army officer has a war-fighting job which entails leading soldiers in combat. Yes, the army is a profession of arms and not a profession in the glamour world. That is why once you join the army you must be prepared for restrictions, regimentation and compliance with a strict code of conduct and officer-like behaviour.
If you are woman army officer who is thinking of participating in a beauty pageant you must introspect as to whether winning a beauty contest will enhance your image as an army officer in the minds of the soldiers under your command.
Ask yourself: Does taking part in beauty pageants enhance your “Officer like Qualities” or OLQ in the eyes your troops?
There used to be a maxim: “an officer and a gentleman”.
Now, with the advent of women officers the equivalent axiom is: “an officer and a lady”.
If you are a woman army officer thinking of taking part in a beauty pageant, you must ask yourself:
What would you like to be:
“an officer and a lady”
or
“an officer and a beauty queen”?
The army is a war-fighting organisation.
An officer has to lead her troops in combat.
Will soldiers like to be led into battle by a gorgeous “glamour doll”?
Or will they like their commander to be a tough no-nonsense professional woman officer?
You tell me.
Dear Reader:
Do you agree?
You don’t?
Do comment and tell us why.


VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
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About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

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