Posts Tagged ‘blogger’

Is “Military Intelligence” an “Oxymoron” ?

August 5, 2015

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: -> http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2015/08/do-military-officers-have-brains-or-is.html.

Humor in Uniform

DO MILITARY OFFICERS HAVE BRAINS…?
or
Is “Anti-intellectualism” an OLQ (Officer Like Quality)…?

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Military Thinking


A few days ago – I received an invite for PILF 2015 – Pune International Literary Festival 2015 –  scheduled in the first week of September.

This evoked in me some delightful memories of PILF 2013 – held 2 years ago – in September 2013 – especially the enlightened discussion with a young lady during the Question/Answer Session of the workshop on “Blogging” that I conducted at the Literary Meet.

So – here is the article – comprising the “memoir” and my “reflections” – once more – for you to read, have a laugh and ponder over…  

THE MILITARY “BRAIN”
Reflections of a Navy Veteran
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Around two years ago – in September 2013 – I was invited to conduct a workshop on “Blogging” at a Literary Meet (Pune International Literary Festival – PILF 2013).

During the discussions – a smart young lady sitting in the first row asked me a question:

“Sir – I have read your book of short stories and I regularly read your writings on your blogs – especially your fiction stories – and I was wondering –‘…How is it possible that you can think so creatively despite having spent so many years in the Navy?’…”

At first – I was stumped.

But – I quickly recovered my wits – and I said: “Life in the Navy is so eventful – you meet so many unforgettable characters – you have so many interesting experiences – so you get plenty of material to write about.’

“No, Sir – I did not mean life experiences. I am asking about thinking ability. Tell me, Sir – ‘…Doesn’t military life affect the ability to think creatively?’…” she asked.

“I really did not understand your question – could you please elaborate?” I asked her.

“Sir – I was an army officer till recently – and I found the atmosphere quite stifling and restrictive – which inhibits creative thinking…” the smart young lady said.

Now – I was beginning to understand what she was driving at – so I said: “Do you mean the military “anti-intellectualism” – which suppresses intellectual activity – the military regimentation ethos of  ‘…“Don’t use your brain – just do as you are told” army culture?’…”

“Yes, Sir – that is exactly what I mean…” she said.

I smiled to myself.

She was echoing the thoughts of Liddell Hart.

Sir Basil Henry Liddell Hart (31 October 1895 – 29 January 1970) – commonly known throughout most of his career as Captain B. H. Liddell Hart – was an English soldier, military historian and military theorist.

Liddell Hart – while highlighting the dangers of “anti-intellectualism” in the army – had pointed out the reason due to which military officers lose their creative thinking abilities.

He opined that:

“…A lifetime of having to curb the expression of original thought culminates so often in there being nothing left to express…”.

There is a saying which applies to the Brain:

“Use it – or you will lose it”

I have read somewhere that there is a relationship between mental activity and cerebral blood-flow – and – like muscles – the brain atrophies from prolonged disuse.

Military Officers (especially Army Officers) are encouraged to do plenty of physical exercise to keep their body fit.

However – the anti-intellectual “just do as you are told – don’t use your brain” military culture inhibits the use of the brain.

The ramification of this regimented blind-obedience military culture is thatmilitary officers keep their bodies fit by constant physical exercise – but they neglect exercising their brain (especially the right hemisphere of the brain).

While a military officer may occasionally use his analytical “left brain” – his creative “right brain” will fall into disuse and atrophy.

And – as the military officer spends more years in service and becomes a senior officer – he will lose the ability to think creatively.

The young smart ex-fauji lady officer had a point and she was implying that:

‘…Living for a prolonged duration in a dogmatic “don’t use your brain – just do as you are told” strait-jacketed “anti-intellectual” insular military environment can certainly affect your creative thinking abilities…’

Obviously – during her days as an army officer – the young lady had experienced this intellectually suffocating feeling.

Maybe – she had also observed the detrimental effect of the prevailing military culture of “anti-intellectualism” on the creative faculties of her peers and seniors.

Obviously – during her days in the army – she had experienced that this “blinkered thinking army culture” was constraining her creativity.

Probably that was the reason why she had quit the army before it was too late – in order to enable her creative juices to flow freely – and – now – as a civilian – her creativity was certainly flourishing – as was evident from the inspired creative writing on her blog.

Well – I told the young lady that the intellectual culture in the navy was certainly more liberal and “broadminded” than what she had experienced in the army – and – in general – the navy milieu was conducive to creative thinking.

In fact – I found navy life quite eventful – and this probably gave my creative thinking ability an impetus – as there was never a dull moment in the navy – with so many curious characters around.


“ANTI-INTELLECTUALISM” IS AN IMPORTANT OLQ (OFFICER LIKE QUALITY)

After the workshop was over – I had a delightful discussion with the charming young lady.

“I am sure you have heard of the term OLQ…” I asked her.

“Of course I know what is OLQ – it was drilled into us – OLQ means ‘Officer Like Qualities’…” she said. 

“Well – “Anti-intellectualism” is an important OLQ – yes – “regimented thinking” is a vital “Officer Like Quality” – and – if an officer uses his right brain and thinks creatively or “out of the box” – as they say – then he is doomed…” I told her.

In jest – I told her that during my Navy days – I always carried two brains inside me:

1. A “fauji brain” for regimented military thoughts

2. A “creative brain” for interesting thoughts where I could let my imagination run wild.

Most of the naval officers I met were cerebral types – but I did come across a few anti-intellectual specimens too.

If you are a “fauji” (serving or retired) – or a “faujan” – do tell us if you have come across some “just do as you are told – don’t use your brain”“anti-intellectual” types during your service in the military.

Like I said – the overly regimented Army is certainly more “anti-intellectual” than the Navy –  and most of the naval officers I came across were cerebral types – but I did meet a few “anti-intellectual” types in the Navy too – and about one such hilarious specimen – I will tell you in a subsequent blog post.

And – before I end – let me leave you with a famous saying: 

“Military Intelligence” is an “Oxymoron”

You agree – don’t you – the phrase “Military Intelligence” is a contradiction in terms – isn’t it…?

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This is a spoof, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Abridged Revised and Updated Extract of my article THE CRAZY COMMODORE WITH A PHOBIA FOR “MANAGEMENT THOUGHTS”written by me Vikram Karve on 19 November 2013 and posted online in my various blogs including in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal Posted by Vikram Karve at 11/19/2013 12:31:00 PM at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and revised version at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 8/05/2015 11:12:00 

TEA TOWN PUNE – Amrutatulya Chaha and Irani Chai

June 17, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: PUNE – TEA or COFFEE ?.’

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

This morning – after my morning walk – I stopped at my favouriteAmrutatulya for a cup of Tea.

While sipping my cup of delicious Amrutatulya Chaha – I remembered this article I had written 5 years ago – in the year 2010 – for my Pune Heritage Series of Articles on Pune Reminiscences: – A PUNEKAR WALKS DOWN MEMORY LANE

So – I thought it would be a good idea to delve into my Foodie Archives and post the article, revised and abridged, for your perusal.

TEA TOWN PUNE
Reminiscences of Yesteryear Poona 
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Pune is a Tea Town. 

Or should I say: “Pune was a Tea Town” – because the culinary culture of Pune has changed.

Youngsters do not drink tea anymore – they consider it infra dig to have a cup of tea. 

Yes – the young and the restless prefer Coffee. 

(Of course – many youngsters prefer stronger, more intoxicating, beverages – like Beer, Vodka, Whisky, Rum and suchlike alcoholic Spirits)

And mind you – even those youngsters who drink coffee no longer like the rejuvenating cup of Peaberry/Plantation Filter Coffee served by the Udipirestaurants – which we used to love. 

Youngsters prefer the expensive stylish alien international coffees served at posh Baristas, CCD’s, Starbucks and high-falutin coffee shops proliferating rapidly all over Pune.

Of course – the coffees served in these branded coffee shops have their its own unique flavours – and it is all a question of changing tastes.

Just imagine – the other day I could not get a cup of decent tea in a multiplex cinema – but there were plenty of varieties of exotic coffee all around. 

For us traditional “old fogies” – we feel that these exotic coffees are quite “alien” to the Indian style and do not fortify you like the strong cup of Indian Filter Coffee or perk you up like a cuppa of Amrut tulya tea does.

Going back to my childhood days in 1960’s – Pune was a 100% “TEA TOWN”. 

In Pune – or Poona as it was known then – everyone drank tea – except some quirky upaas type aunts who insisted on drinking coffee.

YESTERYEAR PUNE – TWO TYPES OF TEA – AMRUT-TULYA (AMRUTATULYA CHAHA) and IRANI CHAI

In the “good old days” – there were chiefly two types of tea for the laid-back discerning gourmet Punekar to relish:

1. The tasty flavoursome AMRUT-TULYA CHAHA at the ubiquitousAmrutatulya Tea Shops at every nook and corner of Pune 

2. The peerless inimitable IRANI CHAI served by the numerous Irani Restaurantsacross the city of Pune. Places like Café Naaz, Lucky, Good Luck, Volga, Vahuman etc were popular for their tasty Irani Chai. 

Indeed Amrutatulya Chaha and Irani Chai are an important aspect of the culinary heritage of our Pune.

IRANI CHAI

Irani Chai is the most rejuvenating beverage I have ever had

They keep the steaming rich tea brew and hot milk in separate containers – and mix it in just the right proportion to get the terrific inimitable pinkishGulabi Chai.

A few years ago – I got a shock of my life when I discovered a Barista coffee shop in place of my favourite Naaz at the Northern End of Main Street. 

Yes – my favourite Irani Restaurants, Naaz, Lucky and many others have disappeared – and only the redoubtable Good Luck at Deccan Gymkhana remains.

AMRUTATULYA CHAHA

Amrutatulya Chaha Tea Shops too are fast vanishing. 

The one nearest to where I lived on Tilak Road in Sadashiv Peth in the 1960’s next to Ashok Bakery has disappeared many years ago. 

Further down Tilak Road past SP College towards Maharashtra Mandal there still exist the legendary Ambika and New Ambika Amrutatulyas

A friend of mine used to savour his morning cuppa in Ambika – and his evening cup of tea in New Ambika. 

If you look around you will still find a number of Amrut-tulyas in the heart of Pune city – though in the newly developed cosmopolitan suburbs there are TeaTapris.

Amrut means nectar – and Tulya means comparable – so “Amrut Tulya” means “Comparable to Nectar”

And indeed – true to its name – Amrutatulya tea is comparable to nectar –  sweet, ambrosial – like the elixir of life!

I love watching Amrutatulya chaha being prepared. 

They prepare tea in front of you in a brass vessel. 

The speciality of this vessel is that as it starts ageing – the tea becomes tastier. 

Milk and water are boiled together – with plenty of sugar, cardamom powder, crushed ginger and tea leaves – stirring continuously to make sure the concoction does not overflow. 

The aroma of this tea is tempting enough to pull you inside for a hot cup of tea.

As an ardent tea lover – I am glad to share a recipe of traditionalAmrutatulya chaha

RECIPE FOR AMRUTATULYA CHAHA (Amrut Tulya Tea)

Ingredients

Tea Leaf: If you live in Pune, get the famous CTC+OP (CTC – Crush, Tear, Curl; OP – Orange Pekoe; BOP – Broken Orange Pekoe) family mixture tea powder from any of the tea depot located in the heart of Pune City. If you prefer branded tea, you may use some good Assam CTC tea. You may also use a strong leaf tea brand like Wagh Bakri Premium Leaf Tea if you prefer.

Full Cream Buffalo Milk

Fresh Water

Sugar

Fresh Ginger Crushed (Better still you can crush the juicy fresh ginger with the chimta directly into the water-milk concoction to let the ginger juices flow out and blend in smoothly.

Cardamom (Elaichi) – peel, crush and powder the pods

Please remember that Amrutatulya tea is not your traditional masala chai – so please do not add any tea masalas or spices like clove, cinnamon, black peppercorns or herbs like gavati chaha (lemon grass), tulsi leaves etc. 

Also remember Amrutatulya Chaha is not the khada chamach or cutting chai– so please don’t boil away to glory.

And do remember – Amrutatulya Chaha is “cooked” – not brewed.

Method of “Cooking” Amrut Tulya Chaha

  • In a brass vessel (or stainless steel – if you cannot get a brass vessel) – mix one cup of water and one cup of milk.
  • Add four teaspoons of sugar.
  • Put on the stove on medium heat.
  • Squeeze in a bit of fresh crushed ginger – and then add a pinch of freshly ground cardamom powder and the freshly crushed cardamom peel.
  • Lightly and lovingly stir the concoction – let it warm – and bring it to boil.
  • Add two teaspoons of tea powder – and keep stirring gently to ensure the boiling concoction does not spill over.
  • Keep boiling till the tea attains bright golden-orange colour.
  • The moment you see a reddish tinge – give the heavenly brew a loving last stir – twirl the vessel – and sieve the Amrut Tulya Nectar Tea – your Special Amrutatulya Chaha – directly into the cups.

You can drink Amrutatulya Chaha from your cup.

But you will enjoy Amrutatulya Tea better if you drink it from the saucer – sucking and pulling in the yummy liquid with your lips – and let it deliciously emulsify on your tongue for that heavenly elevating feeling.

Sip the delicious tea slowly and mindfully – roll it on your tongue – let it mingle in your palate – close your eyes – absorb, discern the flavour, the rich taste – relish every sip lovingly.

Amrutatulya Chaha is truly lip-smacking tasty and soul refreshing – blissful ambrosia – an experience of nectar – you can take my word for it. 

Once you experience the bliss of good “Amrut Tulya” Chaha – you will know why they call this refreshingly delicious and nourishing tea “Amrut Tulya” or “Comparable to Nectar” Tea.

Cheers!!! 

Enjoy your cup of special Puneri Amrutatulya “Nectar” Tea. 

If you are a true blue Punekar – don’t head for the nearest coffee shop or watering hole like a beer bar, lounge, pub or a booze shop – just look around for an Amrutatulya Tea Shop and rejuvenate yourself with a cuppa.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.



Revised Version of Article Written by me Vikram Karve in the year 2010 and Posted Online Earlier on my Foodie Blogs a number of times by me Vikram Karve including at urls: https://vwkarve.wordpress.com/20…  andhttp://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and  http://www.thepunekar.com/tea-to…  and  http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and  https://vwkarve.wordpress.com/20…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 

karvediat.blogspot.in

6/17/2015 10:36:00 AM

HOW TO WRITE FOOD REVIEWS AND RATE RESTAURANTS – Guide

May 30, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: FOOD REVIEW – HOW TO RATE RESTAURANTS.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

FOOD REVIEWS

HOW TO RATE RESTAURANTS
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

This happened 37 years ago in the 1970’s during my early days in the Navy.

We were sitting in our ship’s wardroom enjoying our first drink of the evening – when some shipmates peeped in and asked me: “Hey – we are thinking of going to ‘XXX’ restaurant for dinner…”

“…3 Large…” I said.

My shipmates promptly downed 3 Large Pegs of Whisky each – and then proceeded for dinner to ‘XXX’ restaurant in the heart of Mumbai.

I was – and I still am – an avid ‘Foodie’.

During my early navy days – I was lucky to be appointed on ships based at Mumbai – which gave me great opportunity to explore the culinary delights of the best foodie city in India.

If you have read ‘food reviews’ – you will notice that most restaurant reviewers rate restaurants on a scale of 1 to 5 – with 5 meaning ‘Excellent’ – 4 (Very Good) – 3 (Good) – 2 (Average) – and – 1 (Poor).

These food reviewers consider various parameters like food, service, ambience etc to rate a restaurant (and some even give sub-ratings for each parameter).

Some restaurant reviewers use ‘stars’ instead of numbers – but it is basically the same rating system.

My restaurant rating system is different.

I rate restaurants on the number of pegs of booze (rum/whisky) you are advised to imbibe before proceeding to eat food in the restaurant.

Yes – I rate restaurants on a scale of ‘0’ to ‘6’ – ‘0’ Pegs’ to ‘6 Pegs’ to be precise – and – of course – the ‘Peg’ referred to is a ‘Large Peg’ – which is ‘60 ml’ of rum/whisky.

And yes – this rating mainly applies to Indian Cuisine.

It is my experience that alcohol does not go well with Indian Cuisine which is highly flavorsome.

Alcohol dulls the taste buds, and olfactory sensation, and encumbers the unmitigated enjoyment of good food.

So – if you are going to have an authentic Indian ‘Pure Vegetarian Thali Meal’ prepared hygienically with pure ingredients in clean surroundings – you will ruin the eating experience if you drink alcohol before, or along with, this pristine food.    

This will therefore qualify for a ‘0’ Large or ‘Zero Peg’ rating.

On the other hand – hard-core street-food like oily spicy greasy mutton curry prepared in most unhygienic earthy manner and eaten in noisy, crowded, polluted, filthy surroundings – ‘robust’ food which requires a ‘cast iron stomach’ to digest and fit only for a seasoned trencherman – will qualify for a‘6 Large’ rating.

You have got the drift – haven’t you?

At one end of the scale (‘Zero Large’) was delicate refined pristine food to be savoured by the high-falutin gourmand.

At the other end of the scale (‘6 Large’) was fiery robust earthy food fit only for a tough trencherman.

My shipmates were going to a ‘3 Large’ eatery for Mutton Biryani in the heart of the city.

There was a ‘2 Large’ eatery nearby too which served a more “refined” biryani – and – of course – there were a few ‘5 Large’ street-joints where you got earthy “Kababs” and “Bheja” dishes too.

In my entire life – I have rated only one eatery with the top ‘6 Large’ rating – and I have never dared to go there again.

Of course – I have eaten in many ‘pristine’ restaurants which qualified for a‘Zero Large’ rating.

Later – I started applying this ‘0’ to ‘6’ “Large” rating whenever someone called me home to dinner.

Those days – I was known to be a passionate drinker.

We had been invited to dinner at a friend’s place – and my friend was surprised when I declined his offer of my favourite ‘Rum-Pani’ drink.

“You don’t want a drink…? What’s wrong with you…?” my friend asked me.

“Nothing is wrong with me. Your wife is such an excellent cook – and I have seen in the kitchen all the delicious dishes she has made for dinner – so I don’t want to spoil my eating experience by drinking alcohol…” I said.

Another friend’s wife overheard our conversation – and she gave me an angry look.

She had called us for dinner a few days ago – and I had downed 5 Large Pegs of Rum at her place before daring to sample her cooking.

In fact – after tasting her ‘mutton curry’ – I had insisted on ‘one more drink’ – yes – it was truly a mutton curry worthy of a ‘6 Large’ rating…


PS:

You may ask me why limit the rating to ‘6 Large’…?

Simple.

‘6 Large’ is nearly half a bottle of rum/whisky – and after drinking so much alcohol – your taste buds will hardly be able to discern the taste of the food you are eating… 

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This article is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Posted by Vikram Karve at 5/30/2015 12:05:00 PM

 

The 6 P’s of Military Life – GUIDE FOR MILITARY OFFICERS AND VETERANS – Humor in Uniform

May 29, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: Humor in Uniform – GUIDE FOR MILITARY OFFICERS AND VETERANS – The 6 P’s of Military Life.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

GUIDE FOR MILITARY OFFICERS AND VETERANS
The 6 P’s of Military Life
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

A few days ago I met an anxious army officer worried about his career prospects.

Military Veterans are worried about One-Rank-One-Pension (OROP).

This prompts me to delve into my “Self Help” Archives and pull out this article I wrote around 6 years ago, in the year 2009, which I feel is most relevant for military officers and veterans. 

HOW TO ENJOY YOUR MILITARY CAREER and RETIREMENT AS A MILITARY VETERAN

The 6 P’s of Military Life – Self Help for “Faujis” by Vikram Karve

On page 58 of his war memoir “Himalayan Blunder”  (The Curtain Raiser to the Sino-Indian War of 1962) Brigadier John Parashuram Dalvi narrates an amusing story.

This anecdote pertains to the ill-fated “forward policy” which happened in NEFA (Arunachal Pradesh) sometime in 1960.

Indian Army Troops were being hastily rushed up into the Himalayan Mountains towards the China Border without any administrative or logistic arrangements.

A Commanding Officer of an Infantry Battalion, a Lieutenant Colonel famous for his pungent wit and sense of humour, got so fed up with the absence of any sort of supply system that he decided to use some heavy sarcasm and act in a facetious manner. 

He is reported to have sent one of his monthly routine reports on a chappati(a flat unleavened Indian Bread).

This caused some consternation in the Rear Head Quarters and the officer was asked to forward his “explanation”.

In reply, the Commanding Officer sent the now classic retort:

“I regret the unorthodox nature of my stationery, but atta (wheat flour) is the only commodity available for fighting, for feeding and for futile correspondence”.

I remember someone once telling us that the commanding officer who sent this hilarious reply was none other than General Eric Vas [Lt Gen EA Vas (15 May 1923-18 Aug 2009)].

If my memory serves me right  I think it was the very same General Eric Vas who  in one of his pep talk speeches to young officers of all the three services at IAT Pune many years ago  advised us:

If you want to enjoy service life you should not bother about three things:

1. PAY 

2. PROMOTION

3. POSTING

(He called them the 3 P’s

I think this dictum of the 3 P’s applies across the board, to all careers, including those in the private sector. 

But this truism certainly applies to the defence services, and maybe the civil service as well.


PAY

Many of us focus too much on money and perks ( pay or salary or “package” – call it what you like ). 

Nowadays, most elite educational institutions boast of the high salary packages their students are offered in campus placement interviews and it seems that pay is the primary consideration for selecting a job.

In my time too, I found so many of my colleagues comparing their pay with others and getting disheartened and disillusioned. 

Comparing your pay with others is a sure shot formula to feel miserable, because it is a natural tendency to compare with someone who is better-off than you.

If you want to feel unhappy and frustrated all you have to do is to live acomparative and competitive life.


PROMOTION

Are you an ambitious careerist who is indulges in an all-out no-holds-barred competition for PROMOTION.

Ambition is like ringworm

The more you scratch, the more you enjoy the sensation, but the ringworm increases too. 

Every officer wants to get promoted. 

But, if you are cutthroat ambitious type, and getting promoted is the be-all and end-all of your life, you may go higher up in the ladder, but your life will be stressful and you may not be able to enjoy the everyday joys which navy life has to offer.

And one day, due to steep hierarchical pyramid in the defence services, you are likely to be passed over. 

If you are overambitious type, supersession may make you bitter and frustrated, and you may even waste your time fighting the system, which will make you even more bitter. I have seen so many officers, some quite senior, who retire with anger, resentment and bitterness.

In the defence services, it is a fact of life that career progress is slow and your chances of promotion to higher ranks is quite slim. 

In a liberalized democracy, defence services can never match the industry, or even the civil services, in compensation packages. And this gap is only going to increase with more and more liberalization and globalization and with increasing civilian supremacy.

Modest Career Prospects and Moderate Pay. 

That is the truth. And you must accept this truth.

If you want faster promotions, better career prospects and more pay, it is better for you to go and join some other profession. 

But if you are in the army, navy or air force, it is best not to be excessively obsessed about promotion.

If you get promoted, well and good.

If you do not get promoted, also well and good. 

Be happy and enjoy the unique inimitable unmatched lifestyle the defence services have to offer.


POSTING

In the army and air force they call it posting, in the navy they call it transfer, but this is an inescapable part of a career in the defence forces.

Everyone gets posted or transferred.

A sure-shot way of becoming miserable is to compare your POSTING with your more fortunate colleagues 

(By “Posting” I mean not only the geographical location but also the type of appointment and designation).


3 P’s

If you are obsessed with the 3 P’s, it is a guaranteed formula to make you frustrated and stressed out at work.

And if you want to enjoy your work and career, you know what to do:

Just do not bother about the 3 P’s – yes – be a happy go lucky “fauji” – and just don’t bother about your PAY PROMOTION and POSTING – and you will remain cheerful and happy.

It is a fact that if you live a non-comparative and non-competitive life you are sure to be happy and content.


RETIREMENT – GUIDE FOR MILITARY VETERANS

The 3 P’s of Retirement

Okay, so you did not bother about the 3 P’s (PAY, PROMOTION, POSTING) and enjoyed your service life.

But one day you will retire and then you will have three more P’s which you should not worry about.

Yes, if you want to enjoy your retired life don’t bother about these 3 P’s:

1. POWER

2. PELF

3. PATRONAGE


When you retire you lose your “position power”.

The higher you are the greater the loss of power. 

Many take it in their stride and enjoy their retirement, but some individuals who get addicted to power refuse to let go and cannot cope with the loss of power and keep hankering after it and make their lives miserable trying to get power.

I think this is the main reason why some people never retire and want to keep working and holding on to power till their death.

And it is “patronage” that gets you those plum post-retirement assignments.

That is why you see so many senior officers behaving in a most obsequious manner in the last years of their service – toadying and fawning before politicians and bureaucrats to cultivate powerful people and gain their patronage to get one of those sought-after post-retirement jobs. 

Another reason why individuals cannot enjoy their retirement and want to keep on working interminably after retirement is “pelf”.

These greedy money-minded individuals are never content with their savings and pension and want to keep on acquiring wealth till their death (though they know that they cannot take their wealth with them to heaven or hell after their death). 

“In extremis”, such pelf-oriented persons may even be ready to take up dubious wheeler-dealer jobs with euphemistic titles like “consultants” or “advisors” which sometimes may prove counter-productive and ruin their reputations forever and also tarnish the image of the service.

Retirement is Bliss – if you can forget about the 3 P’s (Power, Pelf andPatronage).

In conclusion –, I would like to say that your life – especially in the defence services – boils down to 6 P’s.

Yes – if you want to enjoy life – remember – do not be bothered about the 6 P’s :

The 3 P’s while in service (PAY, PROMOTION, POSTING)

and

The 3 P’s after retirement (POWER, PELF, PATRONAGE)


Dear Fellow Officer (Serving and Retired): 

Try it – stop worrying about these 6 P’s and see for yourself how you can enjoy life. 

It works – you can take my word for it.

Do you agree? 

Oh  you don’t? 

Please comment and tell us your views. 

As always  I look forward to your feedback.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. These tips are based on my own experience and represent my personal views which may not be universal in nature and may not apply to you. You must make your own career decisions with due diligence.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.


Revised Version of my Article Written in 2009 and posted online on my blogs earlier at urls: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…   and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and  Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve  and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 5/29/2015 10:29:00 AM

MY HUSBAND IS HAVING AN AFFAIR – TETE-A-TETE WITH MY HUSBAND’S GIRLFRIEND

February 21, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: HAPPENSTANCE – TETE-A-TETE WITH MY HUSBAND’S GIRLFRIEND.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

HAPPENSTANCE
TETE-A-TETE WITH MY HUSBAND’S GIRLFRIEND
Short Fiction – a naughty love story
By
VIKRAM KARVE

From My Creative Writing Archives : 

Here is a zesty Mumbai story I wrote around 15 years ago, in the year 2000, after a browse in the Jehangir Art Gallery at Kalaghoda in Mumbai.

I saw two women in an animated conversation – and suddenly this story was conceived in my mind – so I went home and wrote it.

I am sure you will enjoy this naughty romance…

TETE-A-TETE WITH MY HUSBAND’S GIRLFRIEND – naughty story by Vikram Karve

“Excuse me, are you Urvashi Mukherjee by any chance?” a feminine voice said from my right.

I turned my face and looked at the smart young woman wearing a red top and dark blue jeans.

The woman was not ‘fair and lovely’ in the conventional sense.

But she looked very desirable, in a sensual kind of way.

Chic and sexy, flowing hair, with just the right amount of make-up, she exuded confidence.

And as she looked at me with those wonderfully radiant, large and expressive dancing eyes, I felt a strong attraction for her, even though I too was a woman.

“Yes. I’m Urvashi Mukherjee,” I said.

“Hi… I’m Babita. Babita Khanna,” she said.

“Sorry Ms. Khanna, but I don’t think we’ve met before.”

“Sad isn’t it? But I know everything about you my dear Urvashi,” she gave a vivacious laugh.

Then she reached out to my arm displaying a rather impulsive and gratuitous intimacy and said to me, “I recognized you instantly, the moment I saw you. You look exactly like you do in your photograph…”

“My photograph…?” I asked, pulling away my arm.

“Yes. You look lovely. You look exactly as in the photo Milan keeps in wallet.”

Photo? 

Milan? 

I did not like the way she said “Milan” 

How dare she casually refer to my husband in such a familiar manner, and that too by his first name.

And she had called me Urvashi too …

I was truly flabbergasted. 

Who was this woman? 

Why was she acting so intimate and talking to me on first name terms? 

And how had she seen my photo in Milan’s wallet?

“You know Milan?” I asked

“Of course. We work in the same office. Hasn’t Milan told you about me?”

“No. I don’t think so. At least I don’t remember.”

“That’s surprising. Well, I know everything about you. But you know nothing about me” she said.

“What do you mean?” I asked.

She looked at me, and in a rather patronizing manner, she said: “Milan should have told you about me. He’s told me everything about you.”

“Milan has told you everything about me?” I repeated.

“Yes. He always talks about you,” she said.

I was taken aback, quite bewildered.

I did not want to talk to this woman.

So I turned my face away from her and looked straight ahead at the painting in front of me.

Then I turned towards her and said, “Well, well. Quite intriguing. Milan has told you everything about me. But he hasn’t told me anything about you!”

“Hey, Milan didn’t tell me you were an art-buff. I never imagined I would run into you here – at the Jehangir Art Gallery.”

“I’m no aficionado,” I said, trying to sound sarcastic, “I’m just killing time here till it stops raining.”

“Aficionado? That’s a good one! I never imagined you’d speak such highbrow English considering you’ve studied in a vernacular school,” she said sarcastically.

This insult was too much. 

Anger began to rise inside me.

But the woman persisted, and she said, “You know Urvashi, Milan keeps telling me of your hilarious malapropisms when you were newly married.”

“I’m sure he has told you about our honeymoon too?” I blurted out in anger.

I instantly regretted my words, the moment they left my mouth.

“Of course I know everything about your hilarious honeymoon,” she said with a mischievous smile.

“What?” I asked, stunned.

She smiled and said, “He told me about the way you got all sozzled on your first night on the beach in Goa when he mixed Feni in your juice hoping to remove your inhibitions.”

Now I was really furious.

I did not want to talk with this woman any longer.

So I said, “Good Bye, Ms. Khanna. It must have stopped raining outside. Time for me to go. I’d hate to come in between the beautiful paintings and a true connoisseur of art like you.”

“Hey. Come on. I’m no connoisseur of art. I too ran in here to take shelter from the heavy rain,” the woman laughed.

Then she said, “And listen – don’t call me Ms. Khanna, just call me Babita. I’m calling you Urvashi isn’t it?”

“Okay. Nice talking to you,” I said, and I walked out of the gallery hall into the foyer of Jehangir Art Gallery.

It was still raining.

So I stood at the entrance looking out towards Kalaghoda waiting for the rain to stop.

To my horror I noticed that the woman had followed me and was standing next to me which made me feel quite uneasy and uncomfortable.

She was a real mystery.

How come Milan had never mentioned her?

He always told me everything about his life. 

That’s what I had thought. 

At least till now.

I had plans for the afternoon and did not want this woman clinging to me like a parasite.

“Let’s go shopping,” the woman said, as if reading my mind through clairvoyance. 

“No. I have got some important work,” I said.

She looked at me with a curious expression and said, “Work? What work will you do all alone at home?” 

So she knew.

Milan had told her even that.

I looked at her firmly and said, “I’m really not keen on shopping right now. Besides I have to get home early. We’re going out for a movie and dinner tonight.”

“No, you aren’t,” she said confidently

“What do you mean we aren’t? He’s already bought the tickets.”

“Maybe he has bought the tickets, but Milan is not going to turn up before midnight. You can take my word for it.”

“He promised me,” I said defiantly.

“Promises are meant to be broken. He won’t come. He’ll be busy doing my work since I have taken the day off. And then he has to go to a business dinner.”

“Doing your work? Business Dinner?” I asked, flabbergasted.

“Don’t delve too much,” she said

“What nonsense? I’ll ring him up right now,” I said, and took out my mobile phone.

“No point trying to call Milan now,” she said, “his mobile will be switched off right now. He’ll be in a meeting. But don’t worry. Milan will ring you up at around six to cancel your movie date and dinner programme. He’ll tell you he has to work late. Of course, Milan won’t mention the ‘business dinner’ part though.”

“Business dinner? How do you know all this?” I asked, confused and angry.

She winked and said, “I told you. Milan tells me everything. There are no secrets between true friends.”

Friends? 

True Friends? 

Milan and this woman called Babita Khanna who I had never heard of before?

This was getting murky.

First she was a colleague.

Now she’s suddenly become a friend of my husband … a true friend … just imagine … she is a true friend … and me … what about me?

The whole thing was bizarre. 

It was incredible and unbelievable.

No secrets between Milan and his girl friend.

But plenty of secrets between Milan and me, his lawfully wedded wife.

The rain was down to a drizzle. and she said, “Come let’s go shopping. And then we’ll enjoy ourselves. We’ll go to all your favourite places. And we will do all the things you like.”

I wondered why she was doing this to me? 

Why was she chatting me up? 

What was her motive? 

Was she trying to tell me something?

Was this really a chance meeting, a pure coincidence, happenstance, serendipity?

Or was it a contrived coincidence?

I had to get to the bottom of it all.

So I said to the woman: “Okay Babita. Let’s go on a date. I want to find out whether Milan has really told you everything about me.”

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
This story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


This story written by me in the year 2000 and posted online earlier in June 2006 in my creative writing blogs at urls:
http://creative.sulekha.com/happ… 
and 
http://vikramwamankarve.blogspot…

Posted by Vikram Karve at 2/21/2015 12:17:00 PM

RITUALS CUSTOMS TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITION – The Story of the Mystical Cat

October 24, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: DO YOU BLINDLY FOLLOW RITUALS CUSTOMS TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITION WITHOUT QUESTIONING THE LOGICAL BASIS OR RATIONALE.

 

Link to my post in my journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/10/do-you-blindly-follow-rituals-customs.html

DO YOU BLINDLY FOLLOW RITUALS CUSTOMS TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITION WITHOUT QUESTIONING THE LOGICAL BASIS OR RATIONALE?
The Story of the Mystical Cat
Food for Thought 
By
VIKRAM KARVE
 
The military is steeped in tradition.
 
There are many customs, traditions and rituals.
 
I remember, there was a custom in the army, in the artillery, where they do not light more than two cigarettes with a single matchstick.
 
There was a logical reason for this practice during World War I – but today it seems archaic and meaningless.
 
In the navy, we do not clink glasses while drinking or making a toast.
 
This is plain pure superstition.
 
If we asked the reason for a certain custom which we found meaningless, our seniors would admonish us: This is the Naval Tradition”  
 
Even in our day to day life, in the name of tradition, we unquestioningly follow traditions and customs and perform all types of religious, social and superstitious rituals without understanding the spirit behind the ritual.
 
ritual is an action performed purely for symbolic value.
 
In many cases there is no logic or rational explanation for the ritual. 
 
This apocryphal story from ancient wisdom “ The Mystical Cat ” illustrates how customs, traditions and rituals begin.
 
The story also tells you how due to repeated repetition over the years these customs and rituals are gradually established and become a part of culture. 
 
And then, once established, customs, traditions and rituals are blindly followed for years and years, despite the fact that, in most cases, these customs and traditions have lost their significance and the rituals have outlived their utility and meaning.
 
THE MYSTICAL CAT
An Ancient Wisdom Teaching Story
By
VIKRAM KARVE

A seeker joined a monastery to learn meditation and the art of living. 
 
Every evening all students and disciples assembled in the large meditation hall for a discourse by the Spiritual Guru followed by group meditation.
 
Just before the meditation session commenced the disciples would catch a cat, tie it up and place the tied up cat on the lap of the Spiritual Guru. 
 
The Guru would then start caressing the cat and begin the discourse and meditation session. 
 
After the meditation session was over, the cat would be untied and set free.
 
This was the established daily ritual.
 
The Guru would start the meditation session only after the tied up cat was placed on his lap and he was extremely particular about this.
 
Once when the cat could not be found, the Guru refused to start the meditation session and demanded that the cat be placed on his lap.
 
So the meditation session was delayed and all the seekers launched a desperate hunt for the cat.
 
The searched for hours till they found the cat.
 
The cat was duly tied up and placed on the Guru’s lap and only then did he start his discourse-cum-meditation session.
 
The seeker was quite perplexed at the mystery of the tied up cat. He could not understand the significance of this ritual and how it was connected to meditation. 
 
The seeker wondered: What is the significance of the tied up cat placed on the Guru’s lap and what is its correlation with meditation?” 
 
He asked around but no one knew the answer till someone told him to ask a wise old man who lived in a cave up the hills.
 
So our curious seeker trudged up the hills to meet the wise old man and ask him the significance of this time-honoured ritual.
 
“It is like this,” the wise old man said:
 
“one evening, many years ago, when the then Spiritual Guru and his disciples began their evening meditation, a cat that lived in the monastery made so much noise that it distracted them and disturbed their meditation practice. 
 
So the Guru ordered that the cat be tied up during the evening discourse-cum-meditation practice. 
 
This practice of tying up the cat before meditation practice continued, so much so that even after the teacher died, the next Guru continued this tradition and a cat continued to be tied up during the meditation session.
 
When the cat died, another cat was brought to the monastery to be tied up during the evening meditation session.
 
And when that cat died too, they brought another cat to be tied up during meditation practice, and then as cats kept dying, they kept replacing the dead cats with new cats, and the practice of tying up a cat during meditation continued.
 
With the passage of time this has become such an established ritual that now no one can dare to question it. So it has become a custom, tradition and established ritual to tie up a cat during the meditation session.” 
 

As years passed, the ritual of tying up the cat during the meditation session continued and continued till it became an eternal established ritual.

Our seeker, who by then had become the Spiritual Guru, wrote a scholarly treatise about the significance of tying up a cat for meditation practice.

WHY DO YOU BLINDLY FOLLOW RITUALS CUSTOMS TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITION WITHOUT QUESTIONING THE LOGICAL BASIS OR RATIONALE ?

I wonder why we accept customs and traditions without understanding their significance?

Just like a blind man lead by others, why do we blindly follow rituals without examining the meaning, logic and significance of that ritual using our own intelligence and judgement?


Why do we follow customs traditions and rituals that are obsolete and have lost their significance and outlived their utility?

If you see any ritual, custom or tradition being blindly followed and for which there seems to be no rational or logical explanation, remember this story of the Mystical Cat

Ask questions and find out the logical basis for the ritual, custom or tradition. 

Is there some rationale for the belief, or is it just superstition?

And if you are not convinced, it is better to stop blindly following superstition which has become meaningless in the modern world of today.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this book review. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 
Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
NB:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)
 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

 
Did you like this article?

I am sure you will like the 27 short stories from my recently published anthology of Short Fiction COCKTAIL
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About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramkarve@hotmail.com

Twitter: @vikramkarve
      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

BLOGS ARE IN and BOOKS ARE OUT – REVOLUTION IN PUBLISHING – THE ASCENDANCY OF DIGITAL SPACE – MY TAKEAWAY FROM PUNE INTERNATIONAL LITERARY FESTIVAL (PILF)

September 28, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: REVOLUTION IN PUBLISHING – THE ASCENDANCY OF DIGITAL SPACE – MY TAKEAWAY FROM PUNE INTERNATIONAL LITERARY FESTIVAL (PILF).

DIGITAL SCREENS ARE IN and PAPER BOOKS ARE OUT
BLOGS ARE IN and BOOKS ARE OUT
Musings on the Future of Creative Writing
by
VIKRAM KARVE

Link to my original article in my journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/09/revolution-in-publishing-ascendancy-of.html

REVOLUTION IN PUBLISHING  –  THE ASCENDANCY OF DIGITAL SPACE
MY TAKEAWAY FROM PUNE INTERNATIONAL LITERARY FESTIVAL (PILF)
By
VIKRAM KARVE
THE ASCENDANCY OF DIGITAL SPACE
Last week I had the good fortune to participate in a few interesting sessions of the Pune International Literary Festival (PILF) held at MIT Kothrud Pune from 20 to 22 September 2013.
For me, one important “takeaway” from PILF was that nowadays: “More people Read on Digital Screens than Paper”.
In the days to come, this trend will increase exponentially and we may soon reach a stage where the “Digital Space” overshadows the traditional print medium, as far as all forms of writing and reading is concerned, including creative writing and literary reading.
This predominance of the digital space is going to cause a total paradigm shift in the publishing industry.
At various sessions during the Pune International Literary Festival, most publishers and editors were talking about the decreasing financial viability of publishing on paper as compared to the electronic medium.
Many publishers were saying that the future of publishing creative writing, especially literary fiction, lies in the “Digital Space”.
Why is this happening?
The main reason is “Technology”.
Technology has provided the hardware gadgets and software applications to optimally exploit those gadgets.
But most importantly, technology has liberated writers from the clutches of editors and publishers.
CREATIVE WRITING – Why Does a Writer Write?
Why do you write?
If you are a writer, you will realize that writers write for two reasons:
1. Some write because they want to earn money (commercial writing)
2. Others get the urge to write because they want to say something (creative writing)
In your case, which is the primary reason why you write?
There was a time when writers could earn enough money to make a living.
That is why writers could afford the luxury of full-time writing (and not doing a job).
But was difficult to establish yourself as a “published author” since you were at the mercy of editors and publishers.
And only if you could establish yourself as a published author could you earn enough money from your writing to make it a full-time vocation.
It was a Catch-22 situation.
If an editor did not print your writing in a magazine or a publisher did not publish your book you were doomed to failure as a writer, as these were the only ways you could make your writing reach the reader.
Either you had to be a celebrity, or have the right “contacts” in the publishing industry, or get that “lucky break”, or keep peddling your writing doggedly despite getting rejection slip after rejection slip.
Publishers evaluated writing purely from the business point of view.
Your writing had to be “sellable”.
That is why “commercial fiction” is most sought after by editors and publishers.
The combination all these factors is the reason why many “wannabe” budding writers who tried their hand at writing, faced rejection, got frustrated, fell by the wayside, and since they could not financially sustain themselves, they had to take up other professions.
THE ADVENT OF BLOGGING
Everything changed with the advent of the internet, proliferation of information technology and innovations like blogging in the “digital space”.
Now, “publishing” is no longer the monopoly of a handful of publishers and the stranglehold of editors is over.
Anyone who wishes to write can instantly “publish” their writing on blogs and showcase their literary work to the world.
I feel that blogging is the biggest “blessing” for those who wish to write, especially creative writers.
Yes, apart from social media, blogging is the most significant innovation of information technology.
Now, with widespread proliferation of the internet, every person has the opportunity to write.
All you have to do is to set up your blog (which is simple and free of cost on a number of popular blogging platforms like blogger, wordpress, typepad etc).
Then, you upload and publish your writings on your blog.
And, instantly, your writing is available throughout the world for people to read.
You feel a sense of “instant gratification”.
And you experience a sense of creative freedom since you have full control on what you want to write on your blog (without any external “editorial intervention”).
By removing the opaque barrier of editor/publisher between the writer and reader, blogging has enabled the reader to connect directly with the writer and facilitated mutual interaction between the two.
Blogging has proved to be a big boon to writers (who write because they want to “say something”).
If you are a writer, blogging is the best medium to satisfy your creative urge and demonstrate your literary skills to the world
Blogging is also of great benefit to readers as it has made so much material available for them to read free of cost.
Apart from blogs, there are many websites which contain a deluge of reading material in the digital space.
Many people have stopped reading printed paper and do all their reading from screens.
Technology has also progressed fast by leaps and bounds.
First you had ebook readers, and then you read on screens of PCs, Laptops and Tablets.
Now you have Smartphones.
Nowadays, people spend more time reading books on Smartphones than they do on tablets, ebook readers, PCs and laptops.
New sophisticated “eReader” applications for reading books on electronic screens are being developed in a big way to offer a superior reading experience on handheld electronic devices, especially mobile smartphones and “phablets”.
Handheld digital screens are edging out paper books
With increasing trend of reading on handheld digital screens (especially smartphones), paper books are being edged out of the market.
The shutting down of many bookstores (including the iconic Manney’s in Pune) and downsizing of bookshop chains (which restrict their stock to recent commercial fiction) bears testimony to the increasing ascendancy of the digital space vis-à-vis the traditional print medium.
During a discussion at the PILF, someone said that even the popular “secondhand” bookstores were winding up as more and more literary works were digitized and were freely available online on the internet.
WAY AHEAD
What does this all mean for budding creative writers?
If you are a new writer then it is better to forget about “publishing” your writing in the print medium.
You will be better off if you start blogging your writing in the digital space.
At the recent Pune International Literary Festival (PILF) I met a columnist who used to write columns on topical issues for print newspapers.
He told me that owing to financial considerations, newspapers were becoming thinner, both smaller in size and with lesser number of pages.
Also more pages had to given to commercial features which financially sustain the newspaper like advertisements and sponsored features (“paid news”).
The result was that there was less space for content of columnists and writers.
So the columnist was repeatedly told to keep reducing the length of his article and make it shorter and shorter, till the word count became so less that it was not possible for him to properly express what he had to say.
Finally, things reached a stage where the e-version of the newspaper (in digital space) would carry his full article and the print version would be abridged to fit into the miniscule space available.
So now, the columnist has started blogging where he can write in an unrestricted and unrestrained manner.
Let me tell you about another friend who is a voracious reader.
He travels extensively all over the world as a part of his work and he spends a lot of his time waiting at airports, in hotels or in commuting to and fro to airports.
Earlier he used to carry a book to pass time during these long waits.
Now he carried his Smartphone – he can multitask, he can network, and also read a wide variety of things via the web since internet connectivity has become so easy and accessible.
He regularly reads my blog wherever he is in the world, and he can access literature and information from websites and also read a variety of blogs and writings of his interest.
WHY YOU MUST BLOG
Suppose you observe something which stirs emotion within you and you experience an urge to express your inner feelings and say something, tell others, so you write about it – say, a short story.
In the “good old” pre-internet days, you would send your piece of creative writing, your story, to a magazine for publication.
And then, the agonizing wait would begin.
Some decent editors would acknowledge your contribution, and then let you know of acceptance or otherwise.
Others would not even have the courtesy of acknowledging receipt of your story.
Sometimes, there would be so much delay by the time your story was published that you yourself would have lost interest or the story would have lost its topicality.
It was similar with a manuscript of your book, if you were a new budding author.
Everything depended on the whims and fancies of the all-powerful editors and publishers.
Most unsolicited manuscripts were consigned to the slush-pile and forgotten.
Hapless authors who wanted their writings to see the light of day had no choice but spend time and effort to make the rounds of editorial offices, swallow their self respect and be ready to be pushed around.
Not anymore.
The advent of blogging has changed everything.
Now, the moment you finish writing your story, you can upload it on your blog, and, hey presto, your story will ne instantaneously available worldwide for all to read.
Readers will connect with you, just like my friend can read my blog posts on his Smartphone, wherever he is in the world, the moment I post them on my blog.
It looks like: BLOGS ARE IN and BOOKS ARE OUT
Or to put it more aptly:
 
DIGITAL SCREENS ARE IN and PAPER BOOKS ARE OUT
Is the end of traditional publishing industry imminent?
Maybe not the “end” but the decline of print medium has certainly started as more and more people start reading on convenient handheld digital screens rather than lug around cumbersome paper books.
There is a revolution brewing in publishing.
The ascendancy of digital space is an undeniable reality.
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this book review. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013 all rights reserved
Did you like this blog post?

I am sure you will like the 27 short stories from my recently published anthology of Short Fiction COCKTAIL
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html

COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramkarve@hotmail.com
Twitter: @vikramkarve
      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

HOW TO MANAGE YOUR ONLINE REPUTATION

September 16, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: ONLINE REPUTATION MANAGEMENT.

Click the link above to read the article in my journal

The article is also posted below for your convenience:

BUILDING YOUR WEB IDENTITY AND MANAGING YOUR ONLINE REPUTATION
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Link to my original article in my journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/09/online-reputation-management.html

ONLINE REPUTATION MANAGEMENT
Tips for Building and Managing Your Web Identity
By
VIKRAM KARVE
In today’s world you have two reputations:
1. OFFLINE REPUTATION (in the physical real world)
2. ONLINE REPUTATION (in the virtual world or cyberspace)
Unless you are a celebrity, your “offline reputation” is restricted and known to only those persons in your proximity, at work, in your social circles and personal life.
However, your “online reputation” is all pervasive and is available for scrutiny by anyone throughout the world who has access to the internet.
If I want to know about you, all I have to do is to “google” your name or search your details on websites, search engines or social networks.
Potential employers, or prospective spouses, or those desirous of getting into a relationship with you, can easily carry out a basic background check on you by just surfing the internet.
(Earlier, before the advent of the internet, you had to ask some mutual acquaintance or make discreet inquiries or hire a detective to find out information about somebody)
The fact of the matter is that, in today’s connected world, your online reputation is easily accessible and matters more than offline reputation.
In the same way that your personality (real-world offline identity) is important for your offline reputation, your online identity plays an important role in determining your online reputation.
ONLINE IDENTITY
Your online identity consists of two things:
1. What you say about yourself on the internet (your “Owned Identity”)
2. What others say about you on the internet (your “Earned Identity”)
Your OWNED IDENTITY comprises whatever information you upload on the internet.
Your owned identity will comprise so many things like:
1. Whatever you upload on social networking sites like Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter etc including your profiles, pictures, photos, status reports, tweets, comments – anything and everything you upload about yourself.
2. Your Blogs
3. Your Websites (personal, professional and company)
4. All your writings and postings on the web which you post on the internet on various websites, online journals and e-magazines, forums, networks, groups, emails, documents, presentations – anything and everything you put on the internet.
5. Various “profiles” and “avatars” you create on the web – like, for example, your profiles on job search sites and matrimonial sites.
To put it metaphorically, your owned identity is like having a permanent tattoo – it can never be fully erased.
Your EARNED IDENTITY is what others “say” about you on the internet.
Your earned identity includes:
1. Information about you on Social Networking Sites like postings about you on Facebook by your friends (status, tags, pictures, photos, comments), recommendations and endorsements on LinkedIn, Re-tweets and Mentions of your Tweets etc
2. Articles, Blog Posts, Wikis, Biographical Writings etc written about you which are available on the internet
3. Various “profiles” created by others about you at various places on the web.
4. Various networks and websites that link to you
5. Miscellaneous information about you available on the internet – for example, your examination results uploaded online by your university, education board, UPSC etc or results of job selection interviews promulgated online.
To use a metaphor, your earned identity is like “branding” where a permanent mark is stamped on you by someone else.
ONLINE REPUTATION
Your “owned identity” is in your control.
You must be circumspect about what you put on the internet as even a small slip-up like an injudicious writing, indiscreet photo, imprudent relationship status update or careless comment has the potential of harming your reputation in future.
Your “earned identity” is not in your control.
Sometimes, this matters more, since people may be curious to find out what others have to say about you than what you say about yourself.
Even if you avoid the internet altogether, you cannot avoid having an “earned identity” since someone else may upload some writing or material about you on the web, especially if you are a celebrity.
That is why famous people, like ancient philosophers and writers, who lived much before the advent of internet have “earned identities” and consequent “online reputations”.
MANAGING YOUR ONLINE REPUTATION
Do a simple experiment.
Just “google” your name and see the results of the search.
What are the top few results?
How many are “owned reputation” and how many are “earned reputation”.
If you want to manage your online reputation you must ensure that links pertaining to “owned reputation” (what you say about yourself) appear as the top search results as compared to “earned reputation” (what others say about you).
As far as your online reputation is concerned, what you say about yourself (owned reputation) must have more prominence than what others say about you (earned reputation).
In a nutshell, if you want to control your online reputation, you will have to “say” more about yourself on the internet than others “say” about you.
How do you do this?
It is simple.
Get active on the internet – blog regularly, tweet vigorously, and maintain a dynamic presence on social networking sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Quora etc and various Forums and groups, and make sure you network effectively.
You must be conscious of your online reputation because with the proliferation of the internet, your “online reputation” will overshadow your “offline reputation”.
Remember, if someone wants to do a background check on you, for whatever reason, to hire you for a job, to check you out as a marriage prospect, or they just want to find out more about you, all they have to do is to “google” your name, ingeniously delve a bit and explore your online identity (web shadow) and discover your online reputation – yes, all that will matter is your online reputation.
It is, therefore, imperative that you establish an effective web presence and be careful to build a good online reputation and make constant efforts to monitor and manage your online reputation.
 
VIKRAM KARVE 
Copyright © Vikram Karve
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work.

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
NB:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve – all rights reserved
 
Did you like this blog post?

I am sure you will like the 27 short stories from my recently published anthology of Short Fiction COCKTAIL
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html

COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramkarve@hotmail.com and vikramwamankarve@gmail.com
Twitter: @vikramkarve
      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Posted by Vikram Karve

ARMY OFFICER or BEAUTY QUEEN – IS IT PROPER FOR WOMEN ARMY OFFICERS TO TAKE PART IN BEAUTY PAGEANTS

April 11, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: SHOULD ARMY OFFICERS TAKE PART IN BEAUTY CONTESTS.

Click the link above to read my original article in my journal.

The article is also posted below for you to read and for your convenience:

 

IS IS PROPER FOR LADY ARMY OFFICERS TO PARTICIPATE IN BEAUTY CONTESTS

Link to my Original Article in my Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/04/should-army-officers-take-part-in.html

SHOULD ARMY OFFICERS TAKE PART IN BEAUTY CONTESTS
Musings of a Veteran
By
VIKRAM KARVE
Is it proper for an Army Officer to be crowned a Beauty Queen?
Should Army Officers take part in Beauty Pageants?
These are the thoughts perambulating in my brain ever since I saw a poster inviting Lady Army Officers to take part in the May Queen Beauty Contest being held at the local institute.
Let me tell you that I am not against beauty contests. In fact, when I was in the navy, I used to eagerly look forward to the Navy Queen Contest held annually during the Navy Ball. This beauty pageant was a most prestigious event, next only the Miss IndiaContest, and was a launching pad for aspirants who wanted to enter the dazzling world of glamour, fashion and showbiz. This celebrated Beauty Pageant was open to all but I do not recall a Naval Officer participating in the Navy Queen Contest.
You may argue that whatever an officer does in off-duty hours is her personal affair and it is none of the army’s business to interfere in an officer’s personal life.
This may be true in civilian life but it is not so in the army.
In civilian workplaces there may be no personal relationship between a boss and his subordinates outside the office.
In the army, an officer is on duty at all times 24/7.
The army is not a mere “9 to 6 five-day-week” job like in the civilian world.
The army is not a job. The army is a way of life.
In the army the unique command relationship between officers and soldiers is omnipresent and omniscient.
In an army unit, an officer is being observed round-the-clock by the men under her command. (It is the same in the navy, on a ship).
The officer must be “seen” to be proper at all times since any indiscretions will be immediately noticed by the troops.
In such a situation, an army officer does not have a personal life.
The army has traditionally been a male bastion. Even today, after the induction of women officers, all the soldiers are men. The fact that the majority of soldiers are drawn from predominantly rural stock creates a unique situation for the female officer.
That is why an officer has to be very careful of her conduct and decorum at all times lest she send a wrong message which can be misinterpreted by her troops resulting in loss of respect and degradation of moral authority.
Owing to the conservative culture in the army, especially the orthodox mindset the soldiers, extreme care needs to be exercised by a lady army officer in order to ensure that her body language is not open to misinterpretation. Deliberate, or even unintentional, flaunting of your physical assets which can be perceived as trying to attract the attention of the opposite gender may lead to undesirable consequences.
In the army, perceptions do matter, and it is very important for a female officer to maintain a proper “soldierly” image in front of her troops.
Soldiers must not visualize their women officers as “eye candy”.
Probably, this is the reason why women officers are advised to de-glamorize themselves, especially in the presence of their troops.
When women were inducted in the navy in the 1990’s, I recall that some guidelines were issued to newly joined female officers that in case they wished to use cosmetics they must avoid looking “flashy” and their facial make-up must be worn conservatively and without being conspicuous.  Titivation like the use of false eyelashes, heavy eyeliner, brightly coloured eye shadow, coloured nail polish and excessive facial make-up was to be avoided and, if at all they wanted to use lipstick, then only transparent lipstick was to be used.
In matters of dress also, sobriety was advised. Lady officers were advised to take care that their dress was not provocative. Specifically, dresses revealing the navel and cleavage were not to be worn. Flimsy transparent clothes were not to be worn, especially in social functions. Extreme care was to be exercised by lady officers to ensure that their body language is not open to misinterpretation. Deliberately flaunting your physical beauty and dressing in a way designed to attract undue attention of the opposite gender was to be avoided.

A beauty pageant, or beauty contest, is a competition that mainly focuses on the physical beauty of its contestants.
Winners of beauty contests are often called beauty queens.
A Beauty Contest is a “pageant” – a spectacle, a show, a beauty parade.
Army Officers are trained to display their soldierly deportment in military parades as a part of their profession.
Then, is it right for Army Officers to flaunt their glamour and make a spectacle of themselves in “beauty parades”?
Is it proper for Female Officers to parade on the stage flaunting their bodies in skimpy clothes showing off their enticing sensuality and physical assets in a beauty contest in front of an audience which may include the soldiers under their command?
Tell me, if you are an officer, which of the two things below will enhance your reputation and stature amongst your troops:
1. Impressing your troops by displaying military bearing on the parade ground
or
2. Titillating the men under your command by titivating and flaunting your ravishing sex appeal on the stage
As mentioned earlier, soldiers are mainly recruited from the rural areas where traditional old-fashioned social mores may still be patriarchal and feudal in nature.
Owing to their background, soldiers are likely to have a conservative and orthodox mindset.
These simple soldiers may get flummoxed by the culture shock of seeing their “madam sahib” as a tantalizing beauty sashaying on the stage making an exhibition of her attractiveness in front of everyone like a glamorous showgirl.
An army unit is an intimate closed society, like a ship.
That is why you cannot hide anything and nothing remains secret in an army unit (or ship).
In the army, officers are in close contact with their troops.
Soldiers are present everywhere.
Even in non-working hours, soldiers are omnipresent everywhere performing various sundry duties in officers messes and institutes and employed as batmen (sahayaks) in an officer’s personal living quarters.
Thus, a number of soldiers are bound to be present during the beauty pageant and they will be most eagerly watching the fascinating spectacle of gorgeous women parading on the stage.
The “hot” news that their “glamorous” officer paraded herself in a beauty pageant will immediately buzz throughout the unit (with salt, pepper and spices added) and electrify the grapevine.
This may have undesirable consequences, especially for the discipline of the unit, as the next morning the troops may greet the officer with unseen sniggers, derisive sneers and snide jeers behind her back.
The soldiers will start looking at the “beauty queen” officer as an object and the officer will surely lose respect in the eyes of her troops.
An officer must not let herself be degraded to the status of an object.
An officer must always maintain high moral ground as perceived by her troops.
Moral ascendancy begets willing obedience and is the key ingredient in the recipe for effective command of men.
Once you lose moral authority you cannot exercise genuine command over your troops.
That is why at all times you must conduct yourself in a befitting manner and engage in appropriate activities so that you inspire confidence in your troops of your capabilities and leadership abilities.
In India there is no compulsory conscription and you join the army out of your own free choice.
But you must remember that the army is not like any other job – the army is a unique way of life which entails certain restrictions and demands its own high standard of conduct and stringent obligations.
In the civilian world, for example, if you say “woman entrepreneur” the emphasis is on “woman”.
But in the army if you say “woman officer” the emphasis is on “officer”.
In the army the gender of the individual does not make a difference.
If you are an aspirant for a career in the dazzling and glamorous world of showbiz and fashion, then a beauty pageant is certainly a good stepping stone to catapult you into a career as a fashion model, movie star or media celebrity.
In contrast, if you are a young woman who wants to join the army, you must realize that the army is a profession of arms. The army officer has a war-fighting job which entails leading soldiers in combat. Yes, the army is a profession of arms and not a profession in the glamour world. That is why once you join the army you must be prepared for restrictions, regimentation and compliance with a strict code of conduct and officer-like behaviour.
If you are woman army officer who is thinking of participating in a beauty pageant you must introspect as to whether winning a beauty contest will enhance your image as an army officer in the minds of the soldiers under your command.
Ask yourself: Does taking part in beauty pageants enhance your “Officer like Qualities” or OLQ in the eyes your troops?
There used to be a maxim: “an officer and a gentleman”.
Now, with the advent of women officers the equivalent axiom is: “an officer and a lady”.
If you are a woman army officer thinking of taking part in a beauty pageant, you must ask yourself:
What would you like to be:
“an officer and a lady”
or
“an officer and a beauty queen”?
The army is a war-fighting organisation.
An officer has to lead her troops in combat.
Will soldiers like to be led into battle by a gorgeous “glamour doll”?
Or will they like their commander to be a tough no-nonsense professional woman officer?
You tell me.
Dear Reader:
Do you agree?
You don’t?
Do comment and tell us why.


VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 
NB:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013. All Rights Reserved


Did you like reading this blog post?
I am sure you will like all the 27 stories in my book  COCKTAIL an anthology of Short Fiction.
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:

http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html

COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramwamankarve@gmail.com
Twitter: @vikramkarve
      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
Posted by Vikram Karve 

 

SHOULD PAY BE KEPT SECRET – IS SALARY CONFIDENTIALITY GOOD ETHICS ?

April 4, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: PAY SECRECY – Is it Ethical – SHOULD SALARY BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL.

Click the link above to read the article in my journal

The article is also posted below for your convenience

SHOULD PAY BE KEPT SECRET

Link to my original article in my journal :
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/04/pay-secrecy-is-it-ethical-should-salary.html

PAY SECRECY – Is it Ethical?
SHOULD SALARY BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL
Musings on Business Ethics
By
VIKRAM KARVE
A few days ago, at a social gathering, I met a young man who works as an investment banker.
I had heard that investment banking is a lucrative profession.
In my usual loud voice I asked him how much salary he got.
He looked at me aghast as if I had committed sacrilege.
Everyone around us looked at me in disbelief as if I had committed a great faux pas.
To whet my curiosity, I repeated the “indiscretion” by asking whoever I met his or her salary.
I was surprised to see that today’s youngsters are very secretive and unwilling to disclose how much they earn.
I observed this secretive nature, and reluctance to disclose salaries and compensation packages, across professions – ranging from nerdy IT “Techies” to Street Smart MBAs of all hues.
I just do not understand this “cloak-and-dagger” obsession with pay secrecy.
In the 1970’s, after getting our B. Tech degrees in Engineering, all of us in our class took up a variety of jobs, in the government and in the industry, in public and private sectors, in MNCs and PSUs.
Whenever we met we discussed our new jobs – and we freely discussed our pay, our salaries and what perks we got in our respective jobs. There was nothing to hide.
In those glorious “pre-liberalization” days of “socialism” it was considered ethical to be equitable and that is why salaries were comparable whether you worked in the private sector or public sector.
Yes, though the private sector paid more, there was no excessively disproportionate disparity in pay for the same type of work and level of posts between one place and another.
How things have radically changed with the advent of liberalisation and globalisation!
Today the concept of “equal pay for equal work” seems to have been forgotten and we see an obscene imbalance in compensation packages.
Those days, in the 1970’s, Salary Structures were simple – you got a basic pay, dearness allowance, some well-defined perks and, in some cases, publicly declared incentives and bonuses.
Everything was transparent and, to the best of my knowledge, such Machiavellian concepts like “Cost To Company” (CTC), ESOPs, and other “secret” allowances and “hush-hush” incentives and bonuses did not exist.
I feel that “pay secrecy” is a concept which is alien to conventional Indian ethos.
It looks like this “secretive” Human Resource Management Philosophy (comprising elements like “confidential salaries”) has become prevalent in India after 1991, post-liberalization, with the entry of foreign companies who have brought along with them their own distinct organizational cultures.
Can somebody please tell me what is the need for you to keep your pay secret or for your employer to keep confidential the salaries of employees?
Even today, as far as government jobs are concerned, pay, salaries and allowances are public knowledge. There is total transparency in pay scales, increments, and all payments made to employees in government and public sector jobs. I think that there is pay transparency in some large industries and traditional Indian organizations of the “old mould” as well.
Then why have this obsession with pay secrecy in some firms, especially in companies with foreign organizational cultures like MNCs and IT Companies?
It is said that an Ethical Human Resource (HR) Management System must have three attributes:
1. It must be FAIR
2. It must be JUST
3. It must be TRANSPARENT
The concept of pay secrecy violates all these three tenets.
Let me give you an example.
I have a friend whose son migrated abroad to the USA many years ago for his studies and continued to live and work in America.
He was “posted” to India by his company (an MNC).
Though the boy is of Indian origin, since he is based in America, he is considered to be an Expatriate (expat).
I was told that because he is an “expat” he gets a much higher salary and attractive compensation package for doing the same job as compared to his Indian counterparts.
In fact, he also joked that had he remained in India like his brother, or come back toIndia after his studies abroad, and joined the same firm, he would have been paid much less for doing the same job.
(Whereas in India, foreign expats are paid more than Indians, the reverse may be true in America for Indian “expats” who probably are paid much less than their local counterparts)
Is this fair?
A fair system will ensure equitable compensation and will provide equal pay for equal work.
What is the justification for paying different salaries to employees of the same company for doing the same work?
Is this discrimination based on nationality just and moral?
In such a scenario you may have a ridiculous situation where a junior gets more salary than his senior just because they belong to different countries.
Is this absurdity not akin to racial discrimination?
I feel that openness is always better than secrecy, particularly in HR Management Systems which must be Transparent.
It has been my personal experience that a Transparent and Honest HR Policy nurtures a sense of Trust and Loyalty in employees.
Secrecy breeds distrust and creates an negative atmosphere of intrigue and suspicion in the workplace.
Such unhealthy and undesirable vibes create a sense of insecurity and disloyalty which in turn cause a feeling of stress in employees.
If there is workplace stress, people may not enjoy working in such an insalubrious environment and this is not conducive to friendly and open interpersonal relationships as well.
I feel that Pay Systems must be ethical and non-discriminatory.
A candid, sincere, fair and transparent HR Management System will inspire a sense of justice and harmony by ensuring equitable, fair and transparent compensation mechanisms for all employees.
Do you agree? What are your views on pay secrecy? Should salary be kept confidential? What are the pros and cons? Why has pay secrecy become the norm in most organizations?
Please comment. I eagerly look forward to your views.
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
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About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

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