Archive for the ‘health’ Category

Alcohol Tolerance Test – “Flash Point” and “Fire Point” Method

August 28, 2016

HOW TO DISCOVER YOUR DRINKING CAPACITY (ALCOHOL TOLERANCE LEVEL)

“Flash Point” and “Fire Point” Method  

Link to my original post in my Blog Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2016/08/drinking-capacity-alcohol-tolerance.html

There is a saying in the Navy:

“If you want to know the true characteristics of a officer – ask his coursemates and shipmates.”

If you ask my coursemates and shipmates about me – one thing they will tell you is that – in my heyday – I drank a lot of booze.

But – they will also tell you that I had enormous drinking capacity.

So – depsite drinking generous quantities of alcohol – I was never seen drunk.

Yes – I was often seen in “high spirits” – but – not drunk.

(I remember only one occasion on which it can be said that I was drunk – and – I never let that happen again)

The Navy taught me many things.

One of the things I learnt in the Navy was how to drink alcohol.

After around 25 years of enjoyable drinking – I quit drinking around 15 years ago.

For the benefit of posterity – I wrote a series on HOW TO DRINK ALCOHOL and posted it online on my blogs in the year 2011 – and revised versions later – in 2012 and 2013.

Nowadays – many youngsters – boys and girls – drink alcohol.

Sadly – I observe that – many youngsters do not know how to enjoy drinking – and – how to get the best from alcohol.

The evidence of this is the increased propensity towards drunkenness – which can lead to all sorts of consequences – including – personal harm, misbehaviour, violence, brawls, inappropriate behaviour, date rape, drunk driving, accidents etc

Sometime ago – during a “Cocktail Party” – which was more of a drunken spree with wild dancing – I observed many persons who got terribly drunk and made a spectacle of themselves.

From time to time – you hear of the increasing number of drunken driving accidents.

All this prompts me to delve into my “alcoholic archives” and post – once again – Part 4 of my series on How to Drink Alcohol on the topic HOW TO FIND OUT YOUR DRINKING CAPACITY (Alcohol Tolerance Level)

Every individual has a different drinking capacity – and if you want to avoid getting drunk – you must know your alcohol tolerance level.

Below this article – I am giving the links to my posts (Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6) of my series on HOW TO DRINK ALCOHOL.

Cheers – Enjoy !!!

HOW TO DRINK ALCOHOL – Part 4

HOW TO DISCOVER YOUR DRINKING CAPACITY or ALCOHOL TOLERANCE LEVEL

( “Flash Point” and “Fire Point” Method )

By

VIKRAM KARVE

HOW MUCH SHOULD YOU DRINK

It is best not to drink alcohol.

But if you do drink then you must ask yourself: “Why do I drink?”

You drink because you want to “feel good”.

If you drink too much you will get drunk.

When you get drunk you hardly feel or remember anything – since your senses are dulled.

But if you get inebriated – in your intoxicated and drunken state – you will make a fool of yourself – and you may embarrass your near and dear ones.

And on the morning after your alcoholic binge – you will certainly feel miserable when you come to your senses from your drunken stupor – and suffer the pains of a terrible hangover.

The Moot Question is: “HOW MUCH SHOULD YOU DRINK…?

If you drink too little – well then – there is no point in drinking alcohol at all.

You might as well have some fruit juice – or a soft drink – or a glass of milk.

You may find it laughable – but at some parties – I have seen some persons just holding a drink in their hands just for keeping up appearances to show others that they drink.

They do this because they want to project a “proper” image before their hard drinking bosses and colleagues – and – they don’t want their hard-drinking colleagues and friends to call them a “sissy”.

There is no shame in being a Teetotaller – in fact you should be proud of it.

By the way – after over 25 years of “work hard – play hard – drink hard” – Navy Style Living – I too am living a life of sobriety for the last 15 years.

I write this series as I wish to share my drinking experiences with you – and enable you to take more out of alcohol than alcohol takes out of you.

So – if you want to truly enjoy drinking  you must drink just the right amount of alcohol that makes you feel good.

The Aim of drinking alcohol is to feel HIGH  not to get Drunk

And – of course – the aim of drinking is not to remain dead sober as a teetotaller – in which case – it is a waste of good liquor.

So – here is the answer to the question “How Much Should You Drink:

You must never drink just to keep up appearances” to avoid being called a “prude” or a “sissy”.

If you drink too little – well then – there is no point in drinking alcohol at all – besides it a waste of good liquor (and your money).

You must drink enough  just that much so that you feel high – but you must not get drunk.

And – for achieving this delightful “high” state – you must know your drinking capacity which depends on your alcohol tolerance level” 

 

HOW TO DISCOVER YOUR DRINKING CAPACITY 

Well – it was through sheer serendipity that I discovered my drinking capacity.

This method worked for me.

I named it the  “FLASH POINT” and “FIRE POINT” Test

To find out whether it works for you – do try it out – at your own risk – and tell us how it worked for you.

Ingredients Required for “FLASH POINT” and “FIRE POINT” Test

You will need the following which you must keep handy on a table next to your chair:

  1. A Bottle of Rum or Whiskyor adequate quantity of your regular drink (If you drink shots, line enough of them up). It is best to start with a full bottle so you can measure (estimate) the amount of liquor you are drinking.
  1. A Book (with comfortable font size)
  1. Water

 

“FLASH POINT” and “FIRE POINT” TEST METHODOLOGY

Before I describe the technique – let me impart to you some “theory”.

If you were a science student – you must have performed a chemistry laboratory experiment to find out the FLASH POINT and FIRE POINT of a fuel.

You start heating the volatile liquid.

The flash point occurs when the fuel exhibits a flash.

The fuel is heated further – and the fire point occurs when the volatile material catches fire and starts burning and continues to burn.

Applying the same analogy to drinking alcohol – you can say that your “flash point” occurs when you are “high”

Yes – at your “flash point” you have reached your drinking capacity.

If you keep on drinking after your “flash point” – then you will reach your “fire point” – which is an inebriated state of drunkenness.

Your aim is to remain happily high around your “flash point” – and in no circumstances must you cross your “fire point”.

But – how do you find out your “flash point”…?

DRINKING CAPACITY TEST PROCEDURE – 10 SIMPLE STEPS

Here is the technique of how to “measure” your “flash point” or drinking capacity in 10 simple steps:

  1. Drink a glass of water.

This is to stabilize you in case you are dehydrated – and to get you ready for the experiment.

  1. Pour your normal drink.
  1. Pick up the book – and start reading.
  1. Keep drinking at your normal pace – and also keep reading the book continuously.

Take your time – sip your drink – and focus on the book.

If you finish your drink – pour another one.

Keep on drinking – as long as you can read easily and comprehend clearly what you are reading.

  1. The moment you reach a state where your concentration starts wavering – you are reaching your “flash point”.

As you drink and read – a point will come when  you can read the words  but you realize that you are not clearly registering what you are reading in your mind. 

This is your “FLASH POINT”.

At your “flash point” you will be in that delightful state of alcohol induced emotional flux which makes you feel “high”.

  1. If you continue drinking alcohol beyond your “flash point”you will reach a hazy state where the words in the book will appear blurred  and  you have difficulty in reading  as your eyes may not focus properly.

You have now reached your “FIRE POINT” (alcohol induced intoxication).

  1. Once you reach your “fire point” – you must stop drinking alcohol immediately.

Now drink a glass of water and relax. 

Soon – you will gravitate back from your “fire point” towards your “flash point” – and feel less drunk.

However – if you continue drinking beyond your “fire point” – you will get inebriated and become drunk.

  1. Measure (estimate) the amount of liquor you have drunk to reach your “FLASH POINT”. 

This is your “drinking capacity” or alcohol tolerance level (as on that day).

  1. Repeat this experiment a number of times (on different days) – yes – do the “FLASH POINT”“FIRE POINT” experiment at least 10 times.
  1. By successive iteration –fine tune the results –and soon  you will know your drinking capacity (alcohol tolerance level).

 

ALCOHOL TOLERANCE LEVEL

There is a saying: “First you drink alcohol – and then alcohol drinks you”.

Similarly – till you reach your “flash point” – you are the one drinking alcohol.

At your “flash point” – you have reached the limit of your control – but you still have control.

Near your “flash point” you will experience the “high” feeling which alcohol gives you.

When you get this “high” feeling – you must stop drinking at once.

You will remain “high” for sometime – enjoying the euphoric sensation – and then you will have a pleasant relaxing feeling as the “high” gradually tapers off – and – this is the best time to drift off into a nice sleep.

However – if you continue drinking beyond your “flash point” – you will reach your “fire point”.

Once you reach your “fire point” – you will lose control – and – alcohol will take charge of you.

Now – it is the alcohol which will “drink” you – and you will get drunk.

Let me sound a note of caution.

If you drink frequently – your alcohol tolerance will increase.

Increased Alcohol Tolerance means that after continued drinking – consumption of a constant amount of alcohol produces a lesser effect – which means that larger amounts of alcohol are necessary to produce the same effect.

Thus – you will need to drink more alcohol to reach your “flash point” to get a “high”.

In effect – if you drink regularly – your “drinking capacity” increases.

As you continue drinking – this has a snowballing effect.

Having a great drinking capacity may be a “macho” thing to boast about – and may win the admiration of your friends and colleagues.

However – high alcohol tolerance indicates a propensity towards alcoholism in later years.

So – you better watch out.

High alcohol tolerance level (good drinking capacity) is not necessarily something to be proud of or boast about.

Regular consumption of alcohol will raise your drinking capacity – which in turn will tempt you drink more to reach your “flash point”.

And – if you continue this habit of drinking – you may develop alcohol dependence – and you may eventually slip into the abyss of alcoholism.

So – if you realize that your “flash point” has increased – it is best to abstain from drinking for a few days – till your “flash point” falls to a reasonable level.

The less you drink – the better it is for your body – so – in fact – it is advantageous to have a low drinking capacity.

But then – you must remember never to cross your “flash point”.

Avoid binge drinking and competitive drinking – as this can damage your health.

Like I said in the beginning – it is best not to drink alcohol – but if you do drink – remember – as Winston Churchill once said – that:

You must take more out of Alcohol – than Alcohol takes out of You.

And – how do you do that…?

Well – that I will tell you in my series on the golden rules of drinking alcohol.

Happy “FLASH POINT”.

And

May you never reach your “FIRE POINT”.

Remember:

The Aim of Drinking Alcohol is to feel HIGH – Not to get DRUNK

Do let me know if this “Flash Point” and “Fire Point” method helped you discover your drinking capacity.

Here are some other posts in my Series HOW TO DRINK ALCOHOL (links open in new window):

  1. DOES ALCOHOL BRING OUT THE BEST IN YOU?

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/10/how-to-drink-alcohol-part-1-does.html

  1. NEVER DRINK WHEN YOU “NEED” A DRINK

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/10/how-to-drink-alcohol-part-2-never-drink.html

  1. DRINK TO FEEL NICE – NOT TO GET DRUNK

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/10/how-to-drink-alcohol-part-3-drink-to.html

  1. BOOZE WISDOM – ARE YOU A BORN ALCOHOLIC

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2014/09/booze-wisdom-are-you-born-alcoholic.html

  1. THE HIGHER YOU GO THE MORE YOU DRINK

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2015/03/humor-in-uniform-olq-alcohol-tolerance.html

  1. HOW TO QUIT DRINKING

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/06/how-to-quit-drinking-easy-way-alcohol.html

Cheers !!!

Have you found out your drinking capacity…?

Did this method work for you…?

I look forward to your feedback.

VIKRAM KARVE

Copyright © Vikram Karve
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

  1. This article is based on my personal experience. It may or may not work for you. So please do due diligence before trying out this technique.
  2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:

No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved) 

Link to my original post in my Blog Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2016/08/drinking-capacity-alcohol-tolerance.html

This series on HOW TO DRINK ALCOHOL was first written by me Vikram Karve in Oct 2011 and Posted Online by me Vikram Karve a number of times on my blogs since 2011 including at urls http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2011/10/drinking-alcohol-golden-rule-no-1.html and  http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2011/10/drinking-alcohol-golden-rule-no-2-how.html  and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/04/drinking-capacity-or-alcohol-tolerance.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/06/how-to-quit-drinking-easy-way-alcohol.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2015/06/self-help-do-you-know-your-drinking.html etc

Do You Want to Live in an Old Age Home ?

August 27, 2015

Source: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2015/08/old-age-woes-do-you-depend-on-kindness.html

DO YOU WANT TO LIVE IN AN OLD AGE HOME ?

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

OLD AGE WOES
Do You Depend on the Kindness of Strangers ?
Musings
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Sometime ago – during my early morning walk – I passed by Mrs. J’s house.

I saw J – an 84 year old widow – struggling to walk in her garden.

I wished J good morning – and I asked her how she was.

She answered: “I depend on the kindness of strangers.”

For a moment – I was speechless.

Then – slowly – I let her words sink in – and perambulate in my mind – “I depend on the kindness of strangers” – and – these words struck a chord.

I was transported back in time – almost 35 years ago – to the year 1981 – if my memory serves me right – when I had seen the play called A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE which had a lasting impression on me.

I witnessed a performance of the indigenous Indian Production of this 1948 Pulitzer Prize winning masterpiece by Tennessee Williams at the Kamani Auditorium in New Delhi directed by Alyque Padamsee with terrific performances by Dalip Tahil as Stanley Kowalski and Sabira Merchant as Blanche DuBois.

I still remember the heart-rending scene – when – after being totally destroyed by Stanley, while being taken away to a mental asylum, a shattered Blanche holds onto the doctor’s hand and says: “Whoever you are – I have always depended on the kindness of strangers”.

Though the context in the play is different – I realized the universal all-encompassing truth encapsulated in those profound words – which were spontaneously uttered by the old lady J – who I am sure has not read or seen the play “A Streetcar Named Desire”.

As I observe in Pune – I realize that there are so many senior citizens living alone – so many old people who “depend on the kindness of strangers” – especially in the middle-class.

In most cases – their children live abroad in the USA pursuing their American Dream – while their parents live a life of loneliness awaiting their deaths back home in India.

Also – I notice that the longevity of women seems to be more then men – since there are far more senior citizen widows who heavily outnumber the widowers.

Before you blame the “ungrateful and selfish children” for “abandoning” their “hapless” parents – I think you must consider the fact that there are always two sides to a coin (or two “points of view” in every story).

MIDDLE CLASS DREAMS

Let me give you a bit of a background.

In the 1960’s and 1970’s – I lived in a “middle-class” locality in Pune – where parents had two dreams:

1. First – their son must get into an IIT and go abroad to USA to realize the American dream and achieve “success”.

2. Second – they must get their daughters married to a “successful” American NRI so that she too could go the USA to live a life of prosperity and happiness there.

Many such parents – like the old lady J – achieved their dreams.

And – they are paying the price today.

Even today – I see so many parents who are desperate to send their kids abroad for higher studies and to settle down there.

In the earlier “pre-globalization pre-liberalization” days prior to 1991 – it was difficult to go to America unless you graduated from an IIT or topped from a premier University.

Today – it is much easier to go abroad for studies or for work.

Post liberalization – in the globalized world of today – if you are willing to spend your money – you can easily go for higher studies abroad – or you can go there via the “IT Route” – by first going abroad to work onsite – and then sidestepping into a job over there in America.

This is the main reason why there is a beeline for jobs in the IT/ITES industry – it is the easiest way to migrate overseas.

Then or now – the fact of the matter is that it is the parents themselves who encourage and monetarily facilitate their children to go abroad.

Parents inculcate ambitious values that create in the minds of their children the urge to migrate to America or some other prosperous country for a “better life”.

So who is to blame – the parents or the children?

I ask the old lady J – “Why don’t you go and live with your son or daughter in America? Have they refused to take you there? Are your children unwilling to have you live with them?”

“No – not at all. Far from it,” the old lady says, “my children want me to live with them over there and keep calling me to relocate permanently to America and stay with them in the US. I have gone there so many times – but I don’t want to live there with them in America. I don’t like it over there.”

I am puzzled.

It seems very strange.

Why should the old lady prefer to live a difficult lonely life out here in India – full of hardship – when she can live a comfortable life of luxury in America with the best of facilities and healthcare – and in the company of her children and grandchildren?

Why do so many senior citizens prefer to live alone in India and depend on “the kindness of strangers” – when they can enjoy the evening of their lives by migrating abroad to live with their NRI children and exulting in the love and care of their near and dear ones?

Is it ego?

Is it something else?

Is there some other reason?

I don’t know.

I don’t have the answer.

Do you?

If you do have the answer – or wish to share your views on this subject, please comment and let us know.

And – you better start thinking – about the evening of your life – when you become 70 or 80.

You have to decide from these 3 Choices:

1. Do you want to live with your children…?

2. Do you want to live alone…?

3. Do you want to live in an old age home (retirement community) which has assisted living facilities and where you will be well cared for and looked after…?

Remember – if you choose the second or third choice above – you will be dependent on the kindness of strangers.

Think about it.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This article is just “food for thought”, my musings, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt.
2. While planning your old age – please do your own due diligence.
3. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

This is a revised and updated version of my article first written by me Vikram Karve more than 3 years ago in the year 2012 and posted online earlier by me in this blog at urls: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 8/27/2015 11:01:00 AM

How to Choose a Career without Falling into the “Monkey Trap”

July 24, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: BEWARE OF THE “MONKEY TRAP”.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

MONKEY TRAP
Fiction Short Story
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Whenever I see ambitious people burning themselves out at work in the rat race for “success” – I remember this story I wrote more than 21 years ago – in the early part of the year 1994

This story was written for children (and adults too).

Dear Reader: Do read the story and tell me if you think it is relevant today. 

And if you do feel this story is relevant – please ask your kids to read the story too…

MONKEY TRAP  a story by VIKRAM KARVE for children (and adults too)

“What are we doing tomorrow?” I asked my uncle.

“Let’s catch some monkeys,” he said.

“Monkeys?” I asked excitedly.

“Yes,” my uncle said and smiled,” And if you catch one you can take him home as a pet.”

“A monkey! As a pet?” I asked in astonishment.

“Why not?” my uncle said.

“But monkeys? Aren’t they dangerous?” I asked.

“The monkeys here are quite small and very cute. And once you train them, they become very friendly and obedient – ideal pets.”

And so, next morning, at the crack of dawn we sailed off from Haddo Wharf in Port Blair in a large motorboat. 

Soon we were crossing the Duncan Passage, moving due south; the densely forested Little Andaman Island to our right, the sea calm like a mirror.

I began to feel seasick, so I stood on the foc’sle deck, right at the front end sea-sick, enjoying the refreshing sea-spray, occasionally tasting my salty lips.

I looked in admiration, almost in awe, at uncle who stood rock-steady on the bridge, truly a majestic figure. He signaled to me and I rushed up to the bridge.

“Vijay, it’s time to prepare the Monkey Traps,” he said.

“Monkey-Traps?” I asked confused.

“Tito will show you,” he said. “You must learn to make them yourself.”

Tito, my uncle’s odd-job-man, was sitting on the deck, seaman’s knife in hand, amidst a heap of green coconuts. 

He punctured a coconut, put it to his lips, drank the coconut water, and then began scooping out a small hollow.

I took out my seaman’s knife and joined in enthusiastically with the other coconuts. The coconut water tasted sweet.

“Keep the hole small,” my uncle shouted over my shoulder, “and hollow the coconut well.”

“But how will we catch monkeys with this?” I asked.

“You will see in the evening,” he said. “Now get on with the job.”

We reached a densely forested island at five in the evening. 

It was almost dark. The sun sets early in these eastern longitudes.

And soon we set up our monkey-traps.

Each hollowed-out coconut was filled with a mixture of boiled rice and jaggery (gur) through the small hole. 

Then the coconut was chained to a stake, which was driven firmly into the ground.

And then we hid in the bushes in pin-drop silence.

Suddenly there was rattling sound. 

My uncle switched on his torch. 

A monkey was struggling, one hand trapped inside the coconut. 

In an instant, Tito threw a gunny-bag over the monkey and within minutes we had the monkey nicely secured inside.

By the time we lit the campfire on the cool soft sands of the beach, we had captured three monkeys.

My uncle put his arm around my shoulder and, “Vijay, you know why the monkey gets trapped? The monkey gets trapped because of its greed.”

My uncle picked up a hollowed-out coconut and he explained to me: “Look at this hole. It is just big enough so that the monkey’s hand can go in, but too small for full fist filled with rice to come out. Because his greed won’t allow him to let go of the rice and take out his hand, the monkey remains trapped, a victim of his own greed, until he is captured; forever a captive of his greed.”

“The monkey cannot see that freedom without rice is more valuable that capture with it!” he said.

My uncle looked at Tito and commanded: “Free the monkeys.”

And, one by one, the monkeys jumped out of their gunny bags and started running, with one hand still stuck in a coconut. 

It was a really funny sight.

“There is a lesson for us to learn from this,” my uncle said. “That’s why I brought you here to show you all this.”

I looked at my uncle. His name was Ranjit Singh. And true to his name he was indeed a magnificent man! Over six feet tall, well-built, redoubtable; a truly striking personality! 

He stood erect in his khaki uniform, stroking his handsome beard with his left hand, his right hand gripping a swagger stick, which he gently tapped on his thigh.

As he surveyed the scenic surroundings – the moonlight sea, the swaying Casuarina trees, the silver sands of the beach in between – he looked majestic, like a king cherishing his domain. 

Indeed he was like a king here – after all he was the Chief Forest Officer, in-charge of the entire islands – and this was his domain.

Uncle Ranjit was an exception in our family – the odd-man out. 

My father always said that he was the most intelligent of all brothers. 

But whereas all of them were busy achieving success and earning money in Mumbai and Delhi – Uncle Ranjit had chosen to be different.

To the surprise of everybody else, uncle Ranjit had joined the Forest Service when he could have easily become an engineer, doctor or even a business executive, for he had always topped all examinations – first class first in merit, whether it be the school or the university.

“So, Vijay, you like it here?” he asked.

“It’s lovely, uncle,” I answered. “And thank you so much for the lovely holiday, spending so much time with me. In Mumbai no one has any time for me. I feel so lonely.”

“Why?” he asked, with curiosity.

“Mummy and Daddy both come late from office. Then there are parties, business dinners, and tours. And on Sundays they sleep, exhausted, unless there is a business-meeting in the club or golf with the boss.”

Uncle Ranjit laughed, “Ha. Ha. The Monkey Trap. They are all caught in monkey traps of their own making. Slaves of their greed! Trapped by their desires,caught in the rat race, wallowing in their golden cages, rattling their jewellery, their golden chains – monkey-trapped, all of them, isn’t it?”

As I thought over Ranjit uncle’s words I realized how right he was. Most of the people I knew in Mumbai were just like that – trapped by their greed, chasing rainbows, in search of an ever elusive happiness.

“Happiness is to like what you do as well as to do what you like,” uncle Ranjit said, as if he were reading my thoughts. “Happiness is not a station which never arrives, but the manner you travel in life.” 
 
He paused, and asked me, “Tell me Vijay, tell me, what do you want to do in life?”

“I don’t know.”

“Come on, Vijay. You are fifteen now. By next year you have to decide, tell me what your plans are.”

“It depends on my percentage,” I said truthfully.

“I am sure you will get around ninety percent marks in your board exams,” he said. “Assume you top the exams. Secure a place in the merit list. Then what will you do?”

“I’ll go in for Engineering. Computers, Software, IT,” I said.

“Computers? Software? IT? Why? Why not something more interesting – like Arts, Literature, Philosophy, History, Humanities?” he asked.

“Job prospects,” I answered.

“Oh!”  He exclaimed. “And then?”

“Management…an MBA… Or I may even go abroad for higher studies.”

“Why?”

“Qualifications.”

“And why do you want so many qualifications?”

“To get the best job,” I answered.

“And earn a lot of money?” uncle Ranjit prompted.

“Of course,” I said. “I want to earn plenty of money so that I can enjoy life.”

Uncle Ranjit laughed, “My dear Vijay. Aren’t you enjoying life right now, at this very moment? What about me? Am I am not enjoying life? Remember – if you do not find happiness as you are, where you are, you will never find it.”

He smiled and asked me,” Vijay, you know what Maxim Gorky once said…?

“What?”

“When work is a pleasure – life is a joy. When work is a duty – life is slavery” 

“Slavery!” I exclaimed, understanding the message he was trying to give me. 
 
“Slavery to one’s elusive material desires, one’s greed, slavery to the rat race, chasing rainbows. And then live a life perpetually trapped in a Monkey Trap of your own making.”

“The Monkey Trap!” we both said in unison, in chorus.

It was the defining moment in my life – my Minerva Moment…!

And so – I decided that I will choose a career I loved – I decided to do something I liked – which would enable me to experience an inner freedom.

And guess what I am today?
 
Well – I am a teacher – I teach philosophy.

And – let me tell you – I enjoy every moment of it. 

It is a life of sheer joy and delight – being with my students, their respect and adulation, my innate quest for knowledge – and a sense of achievement that I am contributing my bit to society.

I shall never forget uncle Ranjit – and that crucial visit to the forests of the Andamans – the turning point – or indeed – the defining moment of my life.

Well – I avoided the monkey trap. 

What about you?

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
This story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.



This Story was written by me Vikram Karve in the year 1994 and first posted online by me on my creative writing blog in the year 2006 at url :http://creative.sulekha.com/the-…  and subsequently many times on my various blogs including at urls: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201… andhttp://creative.sulekha.com/the-…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 

karvediat.blogspot.in

7/24/2015 08:10:00 PM

Haiku to Commemorate the Moment I Quit Smoking – MY MINERVA MOMENT

October 16, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: MY MINERVA MOMENT – A Haiku to Commemorate the Moment I Quit Smoking.

Link to my original post in my journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

MY MINERVA MOMENT
A HAIKU TO COMMEMORATE THE MOMENT I QUIT SMOKING
By
VIKRAM KARVE

I feel quite sad when I see so many individuals addicted to things like tobacco and alcohol. 

I know a doctor who smokes. 

He knows that smoking is injurious to health, but he just cannot stop smoking.

Another acquaintance of mine is showing signs of becoming alcohol dependent.

But he just cannot quit drinking, despite everyone telling him that if he does not quit drinking alcohol, he will soon be on the road to alcoholism.

There are some who are addicted to gambling.

But they cannot stop gambling, though they know that gambling can ruin their lives.

There are so many bad habits, vices and addictions.

Conquering an addiction is like attaining freedom from bondage.

More than 12 years ago I quit smoking and drinking. 

For many years now, every year, on the occasion of World No Tobacco Day (31 May) I re-post a self help article I had written long back titled HOW TO QUIT SMOKING in which I describe how I quit smoking and give a simple 3 step technique to quit smoking forever which is breathtaking in its simplicity.

In case you want to read this self help article on HOW TO QUIT SMOKING just click the url link given below.

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

(I have also given the link at the end of the post for your convenience – the link will open in a new window, so you can continue reading this post first and then go on to the article) 

But before you read that blog post, please read the Haiku below titled “My Minerva Moment” I wrote many years ago to celebrate the moment I quit smoking and to describe my freedom from the bondage of smoke rings.


MY MINERVA MOMENT 
 
smoke rings
chains of bondage
like handcuffs

fresh breeze
smoke rings dissolve
I am free


Oh yes, Dear Reader, this is exactly what I felt like when I freed myself from the smoking habit – conquering an addiction is like freedom from bondage.

Now please click the link below to read about the Three Stage Technique onHow to Quit Smoking

HOW TO QUIT SMOKING

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

You can use this de-addiction technique to conquer other addictions as well.

Do comment and tell me if you liked the Haiku and the self help article.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. The self help article mentioned in the blog post above is based on my personal experience. It may or may not work for you. So please do due diligence before trying out this technique.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Posted by Vikram Karve at 10/16/2014 10:08:00 PM

SILENCE IS THE FIRST STEP TO INNER PEACE – SELF HELP for STRESS MANAGEMENT

October 2, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: OUTER SILENCE and INNER PEACE – SELF HELP for STRESS MANAGEMENT.

OUTER SILENCE and INNER PEACE 
SELF HELP for STRESS MANAGEMENT

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

OUTER SILENCE – THE FIRST STEP TO INNER PEACE
WORDS ON A BENCH IN MUSSOORIE
Meditation
By
VIKRAM KARVE

I am feeling hassled. 

I close my eyes. 

I sit in silence.

I relax. 

And I remember those insightful and profound words engraved on a bench in Mussoorie.

I read those words long back, but those meaningful words that have remained etched in my mind forever.

Agar Aap Shanti Chahate Ho To Pehele Shaant Rehena Seekho 


अगर आप शांति चाहते हो तो पहेले शांत रहेना सीखो


Long back, around 20 years ago, I visited Mussoorie.

During one of my long walks, probably on Camel’s Back Road, or maybe near Lal Tibba in Landour, I saw some words inscribed on a bench.

Those words were a truism that has had a profound impact on me ever since.

I will never forget those interesting words written in Hindi on a bench in Mussoorie:


अगर आप शांति चाहते हो तो पहेले शांत रहेना सीखो 


(Agar Aap Shanti Chahate Ho To Pehle Shaant Rehna Seekho)


Roughly translated into English this means:

IF YOU DESIRE PEACE THEN FIRST LEARN TO REMAIN SILENT 

Of course the word  शांत  (shaant)  also means PEACEFUL 

Yes, SILENCE is the sine qua non for PEACEFULNESS.

Once your mind is calm and peaceful you will experience a sense of inner peace.

If your inner peace is disturbed, there will be turbulence inside you, and you will feel stressed out.

The root cause of stress is lack of inner peace.

The first step to stress management is to restore your inner peace, and not allow your inner peace to be disturbed.

And why does your inner peace get disturbed?

Your inner peace gets disturbed because there is too much “noise” in your life.

There is Physical Noise, Information Overload Noise, Emotional Noise.

There is internal noise and external noise.

There is noise around you and noise within you.

There is all sorts of noise and cacophony. 

Noise hassles you, disturbs your tranquility and is the biggest impediment to attaining peacefulness. 

The first step to inner peace is to get rid of all that noise around you and within you. 

Yes, if you want peace you have to shut out the noise from your life.

Go to a quiet place where there is minimal external noise, switch off your noise-making gadgets like cellphones, shut out the cacophony on TV, shut out all the emotional noise which hassles your peace of mind. 

Sit silently in solitude, close your eyes and see how your inner silence dissolves the noise within you and you will experience inner peace and you will be in harmony with yourself.

That’s what I do every morning. 

I sit in silence in the spacious airy balcony of my ninth floor flat in Wakad.

I absorb the tranquil scenic view of the placid waters of the Mula River quietly flowing below, the peaceful verdant hills in the distance, the still atmosphere, the pure fresh air, and I feel a halo of soothing serenity permeate within me. 

Then I close my eyes and let my silence dissolve the internal noise in my mind and body.

It is only then that I experience inner peace and I realize that I am in harmony with myself.

Yes, if you want to be in harmony with yourself, you must have inner peace.

And, outer silence is the first step to inner peace.


अगर आप शांति चाहते हो तो पहेले शांत रहेना सीखो 

If you want peace then first learn to remain silent


Remember this simple piece of wisdom.

Try it. 

Experience the power of silence in calming your mind.

It works. 

You can take my word for it.

Remember the mantra: Outer Silence is the first step to inner peace.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


This Self Help Article Written by me in 1994 and First Posted by me Vikram Karve in this blog on 16 Sep 2011 at 9/16/2011 01:36:00 PM at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Posted by Vikram Karve at 10/02/2014 11:25:00 AM

Short Fiction by Vikram Karve – SHE DID NOT LOOK BACK

November 20, 2013

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: SHE DID NOT LOOK BACK.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2013/11/she-did-not-look-back.html

Click the link above to read the story – the story is also posted below for your convenience:

SHE DID NOT LOOK BACK
Short Fiction Story
By
VIKRAM KARVE
 
From my Creative Writing Archives
 
One of my recent fiction stories – I wrote this story (then titled RUNNING AWAY) a year and half ago, in mid 2012.
 
I am posting the story once more on request from a reader – I thought the title SHE DID NOT LOOK BACK may be more apt.
 
Do tell me if you liked this story.
 
RUNNING AWAY (She Did Not Look Back) – A Short Story by Vikram Karve
 
“Hello Sir,” she said.
In the suddenness of the moment, I did not recognize her.
But then she gave me her vivacious smile, her eyes danced, and I knew who she was.
She had been one of my brightest students – but then that was quite some time ago.
“Of course I recognize you,” I said, “How can I ever forget one of my best students? But meeting you here was so unexpected that I was confused for a moment; and you’ve grown up so much, and I too am getting old, you know.”
“No, Sir, you still look handsome, and as young as ever. I am sure all the girls still have a crush on you, like we did!” she said naughtily.
I almost blushed, so to change the subject, I asked her, “What you doing here at the airport?”
“I’m going to New York,” she said, “my flight is delayed so I am just killing time.”
“My flight to Singapore is delayed too,” I said.
“Singapore?” she asked.
“Yes. I’m going for a conference,” I said.
“Oh,” she said.
For some moments no one spoke.
To break the silence, I said, “Let’s go to the coffee shop. We can sit and talk over there till our flights are announced.”
As we walked to the airport coffee shop, I thought of the girl walking beside me.
She had abruptly left our school three years ago, after completing her 9th Standard.
When we teachers expressed our surprise, the Principal of our school told us that her parents wanted to shift her to an elite boarding school, faraway in the hills.
We told the Principal that she was a brilliant scholar, one of our best students, who had the potential to top the 10th Board Exams, and she would surely bring laurels to our school by adorning the merit list. 
 
We also argued that, even from her point of view, it was not prudent to change her school and shift her just one year before the matriculation board examination.
But the Principal told us that he had discussed all this with her parents, but they were adamant.
So, the bright young girl left our school and went away to the elite boarding school at the distant hill station.
 
I did not see her again, or even hear of her, after she left our school.
“Sir, do you know why I had to suddenly leave school?” she asked, as we sat down for coffee.
“No,” I said, “in fact, we were quite surprised at your unexpected sudden departure.”
“My parents were getting divorced and they did not want me around, so they sent me away to the boarding school,” she said, nonchalantly, without batting an eyelid.
“I’m sorry,” I said, “that’s sad.”
“Yes,” she said, “it was really sad. They never asked me. They just decided to divorce on their own. I felt terrible. I did not like it at all. It was amicable divorce by mutual consent – but no one took my consent. Why is it that in divorce cases, no one bothers about the children’s consent?”
 
I did not answer. 
 
Because I did not know the answer.
 
I remained silent and looked at the girl.
 
Though I had met her parents once or twice perfunctorily at school functions, I did not know her parents that well. 
 
In fact, I do remember most of my students, but I hardly remember their parents.
I sipped my coffee and did not say anything, waiting for her to speak.
“I just don’t know why they split,” she said, “we seemed to be such a happy family together.”
“They must have had their reasons,” I said.
“Well, I think I know at least one reason now,” she said.
I just looked at her, waiting for her to continue speaking.
“Do you know what my father did the moment the divorce was through?
 
“What?” I asked.
 
“My dad got married to a woman half his age.”
“Half his age?” I asked, quite incredulous.
“Yes. The female was his student.”
“Student?”
“You know that my father is a Professor, don’t you?” she asked.
“Yes,” I lied.
The girl looked at me with bitterness on her face and said, “Yes. That girl was his student. She was doing her Ph. D. under him. The wily female snatched him away from us. And it was his fault too – a married man with a family getting involved with a woman so much younger in age than him.  It was terrible – a teacher and a student shamelessly getting married to each other. Just imagine how embarrassing it must have been for me and my mother.”
“Yes,” I said, trying to show empathy.
“And do you know what my mother did?”
“What?”
“Three months later, she too got married to a jerk from her office,” she said, “I hate him – he’s such a crafty smooth-talking fake.”
She paused for a moment and said, “And can you imagine his audacity?”
“Audacity?”
“This so-called step-father of mine – one day he politely told me that ‘they’ wanted more privacy so could I please go and stay with my own Dad for a while?”
“Don’t tell me…!”
“Yes. And you won’t believe this – my mother just kept quiet and said nothing.”
“So?”
“So I packed my bags and went over to my father’s place, but it was even worse over there.”
“Even worse?”
“Though she did not say so in so many words, my ‘step-mother’ made it quite clear that I was not very welcome – she kept giving me repulsive vibes of fake politeness, you know those terrible negative vibes – I could feel them every moment.”
“That’s sad.”
“So I spent the next two years of junior college, my 11th and 12th, shuttling between my two parents like an unwanted badminton shuttle-cock,” she said.
 
“It must have been terrible,” I commiserated.
 
“Yes. It was really very painful for me, so I made a deal,” she said.
“A deal?”
“I told both my parents that I wanted to go abroad to America for my studies and wanted them to jointly pay for it – I told them they must fund my entire studies and my stay abroad,” she said.
 
“Oh!” I exclaimed.
She paused for a moment, had a sip of coffee, and then she said, “you know, all of them were so delighted to hear this. My Dad used his academic connections and went out of the way to get me admission to the best university. No one wants me here. So everyone, my very own mother, and even my so-called ‘step parents’, they are all chipping in to finance my education abroad for as long as I want to study. They all are so happy to get me out of the way.”
“Oh, so that’s why you are going abroad to America?”
“Yes. I am running away. To a new life,” she said.
Suddenly, her flight was announced, and she got up to leave.
“Thanks for the coffee, Sir,” she said, “it was so nice meeting you.”
“I am sure we will meet again when you come back,” I said.
“I am not coming back, Sir. There is nothing left here for me to come back to. I am leaving behind the debris of my past over here and I am moving on to begin a new life over there – and I am not going to look back,” she said.
“All the Best. Take Care,” I said.
“You too, Sir, Take Care,” she said.
 
Then she turned and walked away.
I watched her for a long time, till she disappeared from sight. 
 
I thought she would look back. 
 
I thought she would wave a last good bye. 
 
But she did not look back.
 
Maybe she did not want to look back at the world from which she had escaped forever.
 
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 
 
Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
NB
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 
Did you like this story?  

I am sure you will like the 27 short stories from my recently published anthology of Short Fiction COCKTAIL
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html

COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie I am sure that you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramkarve@hotmail.com

Twitter: @vikramkarve
      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 
First http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/08/running-away.html

HOW TO MAKE FOOD TASTY

January 26, 2013

Click the link below to read the article in my journal about the ultimate TASTE MANTRA – How to make Food Tasty

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: TASTY MANTRA – Definition and Meaning of TASTE.

Click the link above to read the article in my journal about the ultimate TASTE MANTRA – How to make Food Tasty

The post is also given below for your convenience:

 

TASTY MANTRA
The Definition and Meaning of TASTE and TASTY
By
VIKRAM KARVE
Long back I had a maid who used to cook quite well.
One day I invited some colleagues and their families (including my boss and his family) over for dinner and I decided to ask the maid to cook the food.
Apart from the usual fare of daal, rice, roti and a vegetable dish, I asked to her make chicken curry (which was her “signature dish”).
She cooked delicious chicken curry for us every Sunday and we really loved it.
At office, I often boasted about how lucky I was to get a good maid who cooked delicious food and I especially praised her chicken curry. So everyone was quite keen to taste this much hyped inimitable chicken curry.
“These guests are very special and they especially are looking forward to eating your chicken curry,” I told the maid, “so make it tasty. Please make the chicken curry really tasty.”
Now I did not know one thing – the definition of “taste” and “tasty” in my maid’s dictionary.
As far as my maid was concerned, “taste” meant rich (oily) and spicy and making food “tasty” meant adding plenty of oil and lots of chilly powder.
So when she cooked the chicken curry she made sure that she added generous amounts of oil and chilly powder. In fact, she had prepared the dish in copious amounts of oil and “richly” spiced (especially chilly powder).
The guests arrived.
Everyone was eagerly waiting in anticipation for the chicken curry.
The dish arrived and it looked very appealing and mouthwatering – yes, the chicken curry looked sumptuous, succulent pieces of chicken floating in rich opulent gravy.
The moment we started eating the chicken curry our tongues were instantly on fire. 
 
Yes, our tongues, our mouths, our whole insides were blazing and we all broke out into a sweat. 
 
Never before had we ever tasted something so hot and fiery. 
 
The rich greasy gravy further added to the pungency and the “kick.
Everyone kept drinking glass after glass of water to cool down their insides which had been set on fire by the red-hot chicken curry.
Had it not been for the “bland” vegetable dish and daal, which saved the day, the meal would have been a complete unmitigated disaster.
Next morning, surveying the leftovers, our maid was surprised to see that that there was plenty of chicken curry left over in the fridge, whereas the daal and vegetables were wiped out clean.
This was exactly the opposite of what she had expected.
I told her what had happened and asked her: “why did you put so much oil and chillies in the chicken curry?”
She said, “but you told me to make the chicken curry tasty. And how can a dish be tasty unless it is rich and spicy?”
“But what about the vegetables and daal – they were quite okay,” I said.
“You didn’t tell me to make the vegetables and daal tasty, so I made them normal,” she said.
‘Okay,’ I said, ‘from now on make everything “normal”. Please don’t make anything “tasty”.’
Epilogue
A few days ago I ordered Biryani at a local restaurant in Wakad near Pune.
Now, to the best of my knowledge and experience, Biryani is supposed to be mildly spiced.
But the Biryani served to me was so highly spiced, terribly red-hot and greasy that for me it was impossible for me to eat.
So I called the manager and told him not to make the Biryani so spicy and greasy and that he should tell the cook to put less oil and chilly powder in the Biryani.
Do you know what he said?
He said: “Sir, how can food be tasty unless you put oil and chillies? And most customers like “tasty” food.”
I instantly remembered the words of my erstwhile maid.
Well, they were the culinary “experts” and maybe I am out of sync.
Now I know the meaning and definition of the terms “taste” and “tasty”:
“Taste” means rich (oily) and spicy and making food “tasty” means adding plenty of oil and lots of chilly powder.
HAPPY EATING (and Happy Cooking)
May you always enjoy “Tasty” Food
 
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2013
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 
Did you like this foodie story?

I am sure you will like the 27 short stories from my recently published anthology of Short Fiction COCKTAIL
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html

COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramwamankarve@gmail.com

      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

WHY NAVAL OFFICERS AND SAILORS DO NOT CLINK GLASSES – A NAVY SUPERSTITION – A Naval Yarn

December 18, 2012

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: A NAVY SUPERSTITION – WHY SAILORS DO NOT CLINK GLASSES.

 

Please click the link above and read the Naval Yarn in my creative writing journal. The same is also posted below for your convenience.

A NAVY SUPERSTITION

WHY NAVAL OFFICERS AND SAILORS DO NOT CLINK GLASSES


At the start of a party or drinking session, whenever Civilians or Pongos clink their glasses, you may notice that a Naval Officer does not clink glasses but will just hold up his glass in his hand and say “Cheers” followed by a toast.
Sailors don’t clink glasses.
Here is the reason why:
WHY SAILORS DO NOT CLINK GLASSES
A Naval Superstition
By
VIKRAM KARVE
Most people clink glasses when they meet over a drink and make a toast for good luck and health.
However, Naval Officers never clink glasses when they make a toast. They just hold up their glasses and say “Cheers” and voice the toast.
The reason for this is as follows.
In the early days of the past, when a sailor died at sea, his body was buried at sea, committed to the deep waters, to the Davy Jones’s Locker at the bottom of the ocean.
The ship’s bell would be sounded 8 times as a mark of respect to the departed soul of the deceased mariner during the funeral service for burial at sea.
In a ship at sea, 8 bells are sounded at the end of a watch.
The 8 bells sounded at the funeral of the sailor signified “End of the Watch” for the sailor.
This the striking of “Eight Bells” (a nautical euphemism for “finished watch”) during burial at sea symbolized the obituary of the dead seaman and was a way of pronouncing that the dead sailor’s duty watch was finished forever.
The sound of clinking glasses is similar to the solemn toll of the ship’s bell as the body of a dead sailor was committed to the deep.
Thus, it was assumed that the clinking sound will herald the death of a sailor.
Hence, clinking of glasses on board ships was considered a bad omen.
There was another superstition to lessen the gravity of the evil portent in case a sailor inadvertently clinked his glass.
The sailor quickly silenced a clink that had mistakenly occurred with his hands or he quickly clinked a second time. It was thought that this would confuse the devil enough so that he might take a soldier instead.
Of course, this is all a myth, a superstition.
But the next time you see someone reluctant to clink his glass do ask him if he is a sailor.
Dear Reader: Tell me, do you find interesting these Naval Yarns I spin occasionally? You do?  Okay, I will continue spinning yarns whenever I am in the mood.
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2012
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 
Did you like this yarn?

I am sure you will like the 27 short stories from my recently published anthology of Short Fiction COCKTAIL
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html

COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramwamankarve@gmail.com

      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

 

RETIREMENT BLUES – RANDOM GRUMBLINGS OF A RETIRED NAVAL OFFICER – Part 1

December 4, 2012

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: RETIREMENT BLUES – GRUMBLINGS OF A RETIRED NAVAL OFFICER Part 1.

Click the link given above or below to read the original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal.

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/12/retirement-blues-grumblings-of-retired.html

The article is also posted below for your convenience.

RETIREMENT BLUES – GRUMBLINGS OF A RETIRED NAVAL OFFICER Part 1

Most people retire at 60.

Some retire even later at 65 or 70.

And some people do not retire at all.

But in the Navy (and the Army and Air Force) they pack you off on superannuation much earlier.
You have to retire in your early fifties if you are an Officer, or even earlier in your thirties if you are a sailor (aka PBOR).

Now what do you do when you retire so early?Either you take up a second career and keep slogging.

Or you sit at home and rumble and grumble. 

Well, that is what I have chosen to do – sit at home and carp, complain and grumble.

Let me share with you, dear reader, some of my grumblings … 

RETIREMENT BLUES 
GRUMBLINGS OF A RETIRED NAVAL OFFICER
Part 1
By
VIKRAM KARVE

According to my wife, work means physical effort.
In her parlance, work is associated with physical labour. 
 
There must be some visible physical effort, some movement involved.
 
Yes, physical movement is the key attribute defining work.
That’s why when I was in the Navy my wife was very happy, since, according to her, I was “working” very hard. 
 
In the Navy there is a lot of physical movement, everyone and everything is moving all the time, and so was I.
There is a saying in the Navy:
 
If it moves, salute it
 
If it doesn’t move, pick it up
 
If you can’t pick it up, paint it
In the Navy (and the Army too): Work is associated with Movement
 
The more you were seen moving, the more hardworking you were considered. 
 
It did not matter whether you were achieving anything or not.
 
So, since everyone wanted to appear hardworking, everyone was on the move all the time – saluting people, picking up things and painting things they could not pick up.
 
My wife loved to see me on the move all the time and when I returned home physically exhausted after a hard day of “work” she was convinced that I was working very hard. 
 
“I wish you had never retired,” my wife moans, “you just don’t do any work now-a-days. 
 
All you do is sit at home in front of your laptop whole day.”
“What about those techies – those IT Nerds?” I ask, “they sit on their backsides all day in comfortable air-conditioned offices, are transported back and forth to office in company buses, have a relaxed five day week and all the perks – they don’t even have to lift a finger.”
“They earn loads of money,” my sister-in-law says.
Oh, so that’s the second definition of work.
Work is associated with earning money
 
The more money you earn, the more you are working – the amount of work you do is directly proportional to the amount of money you earn.
That’s funny.
Whereas physical effort counts as work, whether you earn money or not, intellectual effort does not count as work, unless it earns you a lot of money.
To put it in gobbledygook:
Physical Work and Money may be mutually independent of each other; whereas Intellectual Work and Money are mutually interdependent, in fact, the quantum of intellectual work is measured the amount of money you earn for doing that work.
Now-a-days I am a wannabe writer. 
 
I spend my whole day reading, writing, surfing the internet and blogging and in doing these activities there is hardly any visible physical effort involved. 
 
So in my wife’s parlance I do not do any work.
Also, at present, my writing does not earn me any money. 
 
Yes, I have published a couple of books.
 
(My books have not earned me much money, at least till now). 
 
I am an avid blogger and write a blog post almost every day.
 
(Blogging does not earn me any money since I have not monetized my blog). 
 
And the novel I am trying to write (my wife wonders whether it will ever see the light of day) – I don’t know whether or when it will earn me any money. 
 
So, as per the second definition too, I don’t do any work.
Yes, it is so simple – while I engage in creative writing and blogging:
 
1. I am not seen making any physical effort
 
and 
 
2. I don’t make any money from my writing and blogging
 
So, as per the two definitions of work, I don’t do any work – QED. 
 
I am a lazy good-for-nothing guy who is wasting my time and doing nothing.
Maybe the novel I am writing will become a bestseller and earn me some money. 
 
Maybe someone may buy the movie rights of my novel and I may rake in the moolah.
 
Maybe my Blog may become famous and someone will offer me an attractive proposition or lucrative job.
 
Then the “effort” I am putting in my writing will qualify as “work”.
Till then, as far as my darling “hard working” wife and “money making” sister-in-law are concerned, the only “work” I do is to take my pet dog Sherry for long walks in the morning and in the evening!
“You are such a qualified, experienced and talented guy. Why are you not working? 
 
 Why do you sit at home whole day doing nothing? I am sure you can get a good job. 
 
As an Engineer, Designer, Manager, Consultant, even as a Professor – you don’t know your true worth – you can earn lots of money. So why are you wasting your time? Why don’t you do something instead of sitting at home all day?
 
Even if you want to write, the least you can do is write some professional stuff instead of writing fiction.”
I have to hear all these taunts all the time from all sorts of people.
Yes, it is true:
 
I have got many lucrative job offers. 
 
I can easily get a good job and “work” whole day.
But why don’t they understand? 
 
I don’t want a “job”. 
 
I want to write fiction. 
 
I want to write a novel. 
 
I want to write stories.
 
I want to Blog.
 
I have found my “calling” – I have discovered my metier, my true vocation – creative writing and Blogging.
I want to spend the rest of life writing, surrounded by my books and my diaries in which I have made notes all these years, in front of my laptop, researching on the internet, hammering away at the keyboard, writing fiction and Blogging away.
Yes, I am going to write.
 
I will write my novel.
 
I will write on my blog.
 
I will write short stories.
 
I will write whatever I want to write – but I am going to write, and I am going to focus on writing what I like best – fiction.
Well, if you think I am wasting my time doing nothing – so be it.
To those who say that I don’t do any work, good luck to you – I just don’t care what you say.
Because I am going to be busy writing. 
 
I know that this is hard work and I am working harder than I ever worked in my whole life, though it is not visible to you – either by way of physical effort or earning money.
And whenever I get the writer’s block, I’ll go off on a walk thinking creative thoughts with my pet dog Sherry who seems to be the only person who understands me.
I’ll end with an anecdote, a true story, narrated by a famous writer.
The writer’s wife scolded him: You say that you are a writer but I hardly see you writing. Most of the time you relax in your chair with your eyes closed.”
“Yes, I am “writing” all the time,” the writer said, “do you know what creative writing is? Writing is 90% creative thinking and only 10% is the physical process of writing.”
 
And to those of you who think I am doing nothing after my retirement and I am wasting my time, I will tell you this – just Google my name VIKRAM KARVE and you will be surprised to see how much I have “worked” after my retirement.
 
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 

Did you like reading this blog post?
I am sure you will like all the 27 stories in my book  COCKTAIL an anthology of Short Fiction.
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html
COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

 
Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o
About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramwamankarve@gmail.com

      

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 
 

HOW TO ENJOY LIFE – The Six P’s

October 19, 2012

Click the link above to read the original post in my journal

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: The 6 P’s – HOW TO ENJOY LIFE.

Click the link above to read the original post in my journal

The article is also posted below for your convenience

The 6 P’s – HOW TO ENJOY LIFE

The 6 P’s

HOW TO ENJOY LIFE
Musings
By
VIKRAM KARVE

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/10/the-6-ps-how-to-enjoy-life.html

On page 58 of his war memoir “Himalayan Blunder” (The Curtain Raiser to the Sino-Indian War of 1962Brigadier John Parashuram Dalvi narrates an amusing story pertaining to the ill-fated “forward policy” which happened in NEFA (Arunachal Pradesh) sometime in 1960 when Indian Army Troops were being hastily rushed up into the mountains towards the China Border without any administrative or logistic arrangements.
A Commanding Officer of an Infantry Battalion, a Lieutenant Colonel famous for his pungent wit and sense of humour, got so fed up with the absence of any sort of supply system that he decided to use some heavy sarcasm and act in a facetious manner. He is reported to have sent one of his monthly routine reports on a “chappati” (a flat unleavened Indian Bread).
This caused some consternation in the Rear Head Quarters and the officer was asked to forward his “explanation”.
In reply, the Commanding Officer sent the now classic retort: “I regret the unorthodox nature of my stationery, but atta” (wheat flour) is the only commodity available for fighting, for feeding and for futile correspondence”.
I cannot recall exactly who told me this story, but I remember someone once saying that the officer who sent this hilarious reply was none other than General Eric Vas [Lt Gen EA Vas (15 May 1923-18 Aug 2009)] and if my memory serves me right, I think it was the very same General Eric Vas who, in one of his pep talk speeches, told us that if we wanted to enjoy service life we should not bother about three things:
PAY 
PROMOTION
POSTING
(He called them the 3 P’s). 
I think this dictum of the 3 P’s applies across the board, to all careers, including those in the private sector. But it certainly applies to the services, military and civil.
Many of us focus too much on money and perks (pay or salary or “package” – call it what you like). 
Nowadays, most elite educational institutions boast of the high salary packages their students are offered in campus placement interviews and it seems that pay is the primary consideration for selecting a job.
In my time too I found many of my colleagues comparing their PAY with others. 
Comparing your pay and perks with others is a sure shot formula to feel miserable, because it is natural tendency to compare with someone better-off than you.
If you want to feel unhappy and frustrated all you have to do is to live a comparative and competitive life.
So, like an ambitious careerist, make sure that you get into an all-out no-holds-barred competition for PROMOTION.
And to further add to your misery, don’t forget to compare your POSTING with your more fortunate colleagues 
(By “Posting” I mean not only the geographical location but also the type of appointment and designation).
So tomorrow, when you go to office, remember not to bother about the 3 P’s.
If you are obsessed with the 3 P’s, it is a guaranteed formula to make you frustrated and stressed out at work.
And if you want to enjoy your work and career, you know what to do – don’t bother about the 3 P’s – for it is a fact that if you live a non-comparative and non-competitive life you are sure to be happy and content.
Okay, so you did not bother about the 3 P’s (PAY, PROMOTION, POSTING) and enjoyed your service life, but one day you will retire and then you will have three more P’s which you should not worry about.
Yes, if you want to enjoy your retired life don’t bother about these 3 P’s:
POWER
PELF
PATRONAGE
When you retire you lose your “position power” – the higher you are the greater the loss of power. Many take it in their stride and enjoy their retirement, but some individuals who get addicted to power refuse to let go and cannot cope with the loss of power and keep hankering after it and make their lives miserable trying to get power.
I think this is the main reason why some people never retire and want to keep on working till their death.
And it is “patronage” that gets you those plum post-retirement assignments.
That is why you see so many senior persons behave in a most obsequious manner in the last years of their service – toadying and fawning to cultivate people and obtain their patronage. 
Another reason why individuals cannot enjoy their retirement and want to keep working after retirement  is “pelf” – these greedy money-minded individuals are never content with their savings and pension and want to keep on acquiring wealth till their death (though they know that they cannot take their wealth with them to heaven or hell after their death). In extremis, such pelf-oriented persons may even be ready to take up dubious wheeler-dealer jobs with euphemistic titles like “consultants” or “advisors” which sometimes can prove counter-productive and ruin their reputations forever.
Retirement is Bliss – if you can forget about the 3 P’s (Power, Pelf and Patronage).
In conclusion, I would like to say that your life boils down to 6 P’s.
Yes, if you want to enjoy life just don’t bother about the Six P’s –
The Three P’s while in service (PAY, PROMOTION, POSTING)
and
The Three P’s after retirement (POWER, PELF, PATRONAGE).
Dear Reader (Serving or Retired): Try it – stop worrying about these P’s and see for yourself how you can enjoy life. It works – you can take my word for it.
Please comment and tell us your views. As always, I look forward to your feedback.
 
VIKRAM KARVE 
Copyright © Vikram Karve 2012
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work.
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Did you like this post?
I am sure you will like the 27 fiction short stories from my recently published anthology of Short Fiction COCKTAIL 
To order your COCKTAIL please click any of the links below:
http://www.flipkart.com/cocktail-vikram-karve-short-stories-book-8191091844?affid=nme
http://www.indiaplaza.in/cocktail-vikram-karve/books/9788191091847.htm
http://www.apkpublishers.com/books/short-stories/cocktail-by-vikram-karve.html


COCKTAIL ebook
If you prefer reading ebooks on Kindle or your ebook reader, please order Cocktail E-book by clicking the links below:
AMAZON
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005MGERZ6
SMASHWORDS
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87925

Foodie Book:  Appetite for a Stroll
If your are a Foodie you will like my book of Food Adventures APPETITE FOR A STROLL. Do order a copy from FLIPKART:
http://www.flipkart.com/appetite-stroll-vikram-karve/8190690094-gw23f9mr2o

About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories, creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse – his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
Professional Profile Vikram Karve: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karve
Vikram Karve Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/vikramkarve
Vikram Karve Creative Writing Blog: http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com/blog/posts.htm
Email: vikramkarve@sify.com

 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
  
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