Archive for April 2015

New Age Military Officer Like Qualities (OLQ) – Humor in Uniform

April 30, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: Humor in Uniform – NEW AGE OLQ.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

HUMOUR IN UNIFORM

A Hilarious Story from my Humor in Uniform Archives…

NEW AGE OLQ 
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE


RHIP (RANK HAS ITS PRIVILEGES) – THE PECKING ORDER ALWAYS PREVAILS

Let me tell you an interesting story that happened a long time ago when I was on the faculty of IAT Pune which, once upon a time, was a premier inter-service institution for higher education.

A student officer, Lieutenant “A”, wrote a research paper based on his Master’s Dissertation.

It was decided to send this research paper to a prestigious professional journal for publication.

As was the custom in academia, the student officer (Lieutenant “A”) wrote his name first as the principal author.

He included the name of his dissertation guide (Lieutenant Commander “B”) at the second place as co-author.

The research paper authored by Lieutenant “A” as principal author and guide Lieutenant Commander “B” as co-author, as was the norm for research papers, was duly forwarded through “proper channel” for publication in a prestigious academic journal.

The Head of Department (Commander “C”) read the research paper and was impressed by the high quality of work.

He was quite sure that this top-quality research paper would be accepted by the prestigious journal for publication and this would bring laurels to the department and institution.

The Head of Department Commander “C” called the student officer Lieutenant “A” and the faculty guide Lieutenant Commander “B” and said to them: “You have done outstanding research work and written an excellent paper. Well done. Why don’t you include my name as a co-author? After all I am the Head of Department and I gave you all the help and encouragement you wanted, didn’t I?”

“Sir, we have included your name in the acknowledgements paragraph at the end of the paper,” the guide Lieutenant Commander “B” said.

Commander “C” looked at Lieutenant Commander “B” and said: “I would like my name to be mentioned as an author. After all, you are the guide but you too have included your name as an author, haven’t you? So what is your problem if my name is also included? After all, I am the Head of Department.” 

So the research paper now had 3 authors:

1. Lieutenant “A” (the actual researcher)

2. Lieutenant Commander “B” (the guide)

3. Commander “C” (the Head of Department).


As the paper progressed through the hierarchy, the Director of Studies (Navy) Commodore “D” decided to add his name too.

Commodore “D”, who was a careerist naval officer, knew that in the academia, a lot of importance was given to research publications, and the newly appointed Dean, a renowned Civilian Scientist, was exhorting the faculty to publish research papers.

Commodore “D” knew that in his present “academic” appointment publishing papers was considered as a “feather in his cap” and this would boost his ACR (performance appraisal report) and enhance his promotion prospects.

Also, such “academic achievements” would add value to his CV when he would look for job in his second innings after retirement.

So the Commodore “D” (who hardly did any research work) was in the habit of adding his name as co-author to all research papers going out of his faculty.

So the research paper now had four authors:

1. Lieutenant “A” (the Researcher)

2. Lieutenant Commander “B” (the Guide)

3. Commander “C” (the Head of Department) 

4. Commodore “D” [the Director of Studies (Navy)]


The research paper was sent to Headquarters for final clearance and forwarding to the prestigious journal.

After due process, one fine day, the paper landed on the desk of an administrative staff officer who was to forward it to the journal.

The administrative staff officer, a Salt Horse Commander from the Executive Branch was a most rank conscious officer.

Actually, he was just a “post office” and his job was to forward the research paper, that’s all.

But then, like all “post office” staff officers in Headquarters, he had an exaggerated sense of self importance.

The moment he saw the research paper, he sensed something was wrong.

“Why is the name of the junior-most officer on top?” he wondered.

Then he noticed that the names were written in reverse order of seniority – the name of “A” (Lieutenant) was on top – followed by “B” (Lieutenant Commander) – then “C” (Commander) – and lastly “D” (Commodore) whose name was at the bottom of the list.

This “breach of protocol” irked him and it was unacceptable to a “service minded” officer like him. 

In the armed forces, and especially in the navy, rank and seniority were sacrosanct.

The “pecking order” had to be maintained at all costs.

In the rank conscious navy, putting a Lieutenant’s name on top and a Commodore’s name at the bottom was tantamount to “sacrilege”.

The administrative officer decided to correct this “mistake”.

He called his officer clerk and told him retype the names of the authors in order of seniority – the senior-most Commodore “D” on top followed by Commander “C” at second place, then Lieutenant Commander “B” at the third place and Lieutenant “A” at the bottom of the list, at the fourth place.

Then, fully satisfied at the good work done by him, the staff officer duly forwarded the research paper to the journal.

Now, the research journal had a policy of restricting the number of authors to a maximum of three authors.

Since only three authors were permitted, the editor of the journal duly “chopped off” the name of the fourth author Lieutenant “A”.

When the research paper was finally published, the name of Commodore “D” appeared on top as the principal author.

This was followed by the names of the Head of Department Commander “C” and the guide Lieutenant Commander “B” as co-authors.

The name of the actual researcher Lieutenant “A” was missing and did not figure anywhere.

Yes, the name of Lieutenant “A” was nowhere to be seen in the journal.

Looking at the paper as it appeared in the journal, it seemed that the main research work had been done by Commodore “D” who was listed on top as the principal author of the research paper.

As per convention, it seemed that the other two authors, Commander “C” and Lieutenant Commander “B” had assisted Commodore “D” in carrying out the research work.

So, Commodore “D” got the maximum credit as the principal author although he did not have have the slightest clue about the actual research work done by Lieutenant “A”.

What a travesty?

Lieutenant “A” who slogged for over one year and did all the research work and wrote the excellent paper did not get any credit for his efforts.

The laurels were usurped by his seniors Commodore “D”, Commander “C” and Lieutenant Commander “B”.

This anecdote happened at IAT, in an Academic and R&D domain – but I have seen similar episodes happen in various other situations in the navy too, where credit for work done by a junior is hijacked by his seniors. 


NEW AGE OLQ (OFFICER LIKE QUALITIES)

As illustrated in the story above – in the Navy – I found two types of officers:

1. Sincere Officers who genuinely did the work

2. Charlatans who dishonestly usurped the credit

Let me give you another example.

Once when we worked in a project team, we had one such imposter.

This charlatan always avoided doing any actual work but discreetly kept track of what was going on.

As is the case with most “con artists” this officer possessed excellent “communication skills” and thanks to his “gift of the gab” he excelled in “hogging the limelight” in the presence of senior officers.

In fact, this “fraud officer” had created an impression in the eyes of senior officers that it was he who was doing most of the work in the team.

He also succeeded in projecting an image of the rest of his fellow-officers of the team as lazy “shammers”.

Of course, in due course, we exposed him by employing “disinformation shock” techniques of “information warfare” – but that is another story.

Rank Has Its Privileges (RHIP).

But does RHIP permit you to hijack the credit due to your juniors? 

They say that the defence services are a reflection of civilian society.

There was a time, long back, when senior officers displayed impeccable conduct and had exemplary values.

But, as civilian society changed for the worse, some of the ills percolated into the defence services, and a few senior officers started emulating civilian leaders.

Traditional OLQ (Officer Like Qualities) became antiquated and was replaced by New Age OLQ.

The detrimental effects of New Age OLQ are visible if you follow the goings-on in the defence services.

As I said earlier, during my long service I have observed that there are two types of officers:

1. Sincere Officers (Traditional OLQ)

2. Charlatans (New Age OLQ)

And it is due to the unsung efforts of the first type of sincere officer that things are running fine in the defence services.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh. 
2. All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Abridged and Updated Version of the My Article first posted by me Vikram Karve on 12 Aug 2013 at 8/12/2013 01:07:00 PM in this blog at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 4/30/2015 10:33:00 AM

WHY I GREW A BEARD – The Story of My Majestic Navy Beard

April 29, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: JOIN THE NAVY AND GROW A BEARD – The Story of My Majestic Beard.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

JOIN THE NAVY AND GROW A BEARD

THE STORY OF MY MAJESTIC BEARD
Harking Back to My Glorious Navy Days
By
VIKRAM KARVE

If you are an unemployed unwanted uncelebrated “retired” military veteran like me – what is the best thing to do?

Reminisce.

Yes, I can hark back in time and reminisce – and I can talk about my “good old navy days”.

But what do I do if there is no one to talk to?

I can write about my unforgettable reminiscences.

Well – that is exactly what I am going to do now.

I will hark back in time to my early navy days – take you back to the 1970’s – and tell you why – thanks to the Navy – I grew my handsome beard – which adorns my face till today.

By the way – if I had not joined the Navy – I probably would not have kept a beard.

Yes – before I joined the Navy – I was clean shaven – and I had never contemplated having a beard.

But then when you join the Navy – everything changes – and you change – whether it is for the better or for the worse – well, that depends on you!

I remember my first day at the Naval Academy in Cochin (now called Kochi).

The moment we reported to the academy – an army of barbers descended on us to chop off most of the copious hair adoring our heads – and shave the stubble on our faces.

We were given crew cuts and our faces shaven clean.

A few young men did have moustaches – but these moustaches were ruthlessly removed.

At the Naval Academy – even moustaches were not permitted – and all trainees had to be “clean shaven”.


“SEAMANLIKE” APPEARANCE

Dear Reader – before I proceed further with my story – let me digress – and tell you a bit about the navy tradition of sailors keeping beards.

After independence – we imbibed our military traditions from our erstwhile rulers – the British – and accordingly – our Navy adopted the customs and traditions of the Royal Navy.

Hence – even on the subject of moustaches and beards – the Indian Navy had adopted, verbatim, the regulations of the British Navy – which required that a naval officer or sailor had either to have both “beard and moustache” or neither.

This means that you had to have a “full-set beard” (a full beard and moustache).

The beard must be complete – joined from sideburns – covering the entire jaw-line and chin – and joining the moustache.

A Navy Officer or Sailor had to have a “full-set beard” or nothing.

A moustache on its own was not permitted.

You were required to obtain the approval of your Commanding Officer to “discontinue shaving” or to “continue shaving” – every time you wanted to change your appearance.

If you wanted to grow a beard – you had to put in a request to stop shaving – yes – you had to formally seek permission to “cease shaving”.

If your request was granted – you were allowed three weeks (21 days) to grow your beard.

During this time of 21 days – as the beard grew – the beard grower was not permitted to go ashore or to be seen in public until the Commanding Officer felt that the beard was fit for public viewing.

A Naval Officer or Sailor was required to have a rugged, “full set”, masculine looking, well-developed beard which gave you a macho appearance.

Wispy or wimpy looking beards were not allowed – and “designer stubble” was certainly not permitted.

If the Commanding Officer (Captain) approved of your beard – you were allowed to keep it.

But if your Commanding Officer deemed your beard unworthy of a seaman – you were ordered to “shave off” your beard.

Suppose you were allowed to have a beard – and you kept the beard for a few years – but later – if you wanted to shave off your beard – you had to seek permission to “start shaving”.

Beards were not permitted in the Army and Air Force – but you were allowed to keep moustaches.

Yes – if you are in the army or air force – you can either keep your face clean shaven – or you can keep a moustache (without a beard).

I am sure the Army and Air Force have regulations governing moustaches which specify the types of moustaches permitted, sizes, shapes, styles etc.

But I have seen that the Air Force has a fondness for handlebar moustaches – and so do some Artillery Officers.

Sadly – many officers now prefer the “metrosexual” clean shaven look – in the Navy – and in the Army and Air Force too.


MOUSTACHES IN THE NAVY

Sometime in the 1970’s – due to pressures from youngsters and to be in sync with prevailing customs – the Indian Navy relaxed the provisions governing wearing of moustaches and beards.

The regulations were amended so that – now – the issue of permitting “moustaches without beards” was left to the Commanding Officer’s discretion.

After these amendments – the Captain could permit officers and sailors to wear moustaches and beards or shave them off, if they so desired. 

Moustaches and beard could be worn with or without the beard and moustaches respectively. 

Side whiskers were permitted down to the level of the lobe of the ear. 

Moustaches, beard and whiskers had to be neatly cut and trimmed. 

Of course – this privilege may be withdrawn in cases of untidy growth.

This relaxation has resulted in many navy youngsters sporting moustaches.

Of course – the seasoned sea-dogs preferred “full-set” beards.


WHY I GREW A “FULL SET” NAVY BEARD

After completing our basic naval training – we were sent for our specialization course.

As I told you earlier – consequent to the relaxation of “appearance” regulations – a few young officers had started sporting moustaches – and I too felt like having a moustache.

So – the moment we reported for the specialization course – I applied for permission to grow a moustache.

The Commanding Officer refused permission.

I protested to my training officer – but he showed me the regulations which stated that granting permission for moustache was the Commanding Officer’s prerogative.

“Sir – suppose I seek permission to grow a beard?” I asked.

“If you apply for permission to grow a beard – he will have to grant you permission – at least for three weeks,” the Training Officer said.

My request to “cease shaving” was promptly granted.

I stopped shaving – and my beard started to grow.

Around 15 days later – during Friday morning divisions (parade) – the Commanding Officer – who was inspecting the Under Trainee Officers Division, suddenly stopped before me.

The Commanding Officer looked at my face – as if scrutinizing it – and he said, “You look good in a beard. Your beard suits you. Keep it.”

This happened more than 37 years ago – and my beloved beard has already celebrated its 37th birthday a few months ago.

Quite funny – isn’t it?

I wanted to grow a moustache – but – thanks to quirks of the Navy – I landed up growing a beard instead.

But once I grew my beard – I started liking my beard – and soon my beard became so sacrosanct to me – that I never shaved it off.

I love my majestic beard.

My beard has been my loyal companion throughout my entire naval career – and now my beard is my faithful friend in my lonely retirement days

I am proud of my beard.

I am glad I have a beard.

In hindsight – I do not know whether joining the Navy was good for me – or whether I would have done better in the “civvy street”.

But one thing is sure.

I owe my beard to the Navy.

Had it not been for the Navy – I may not have kept a beard.

And as I write this – from time to time – I lovingly caress my lovely beard. 


QUOTES ON BEARDS

In conclusion – let me give you 3 quotes on beards:

A woman with a beard looks like a man – and a man without a beard looks like a woman
~ Afghan saying

There are two kinds of people in this world that go around beardless – boys and women – and I am neither one
~ Greek saying

He that hath a beard is more than a youth – and he that hath no beard is less than a man
~ William Shakespeare

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Revised Version of my story posted online earlier in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal Blog on 21 Sep 2014 at url: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 4/29/2015 11:01:00 PM

A Foodie Love Story – SPDP – A DELICIOUS ROMANCE

April 29, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: SPDP – A DELICIOUS ROMANCE.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal:  
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

SPDP – A DELICIOUS ROMANCE
Short Fiction – A Foodie Love Story
By 
VIKRAM KARVE 

From my Creative Writing Archives:
 
I started writing this story 10 years ago – in the year 2006 I think after a delicious SPDP at to my favourite Vaishali Restaurant in Pune – but I left the story incomplete. 

I wonder why I did not complete this story – but then that happens to many of my stories. 

Then, after a gap of three years, in the year 2009, I completed the story.

I am posting this delicious foodie romance once more for you to read.

Do tell me if you like this delicious love story…

SPDP – LIP SMACKING ROMANCE – Delicious Love Story By Vikram Karve 

SPDP.

That’s right – SPDP…!
 
You know what SPDP is – don’t you…?
 
You don’t? 

Don’t tell me you don’t know what SPDP is…!
 
Oh. 

I’m sorry.

Maybe you are not a Punekar.

And if you do live in Pune and you still don’t even know what SPDP is, then it’s a pity…a real pity…!
 
SPDP – Sev Potato Dahi Puri – that’s what the acronym SPDP stands for.

Why ‘Potato’…?

Why not ‘Batata’…?

Well, I do not know – you’ll have to ask the guys at Vaishali.
 
Now don’t tell me you don’t know what Vaishali is…?

That’s being real daft and clueless, isn’t it…?

Well, Vaishali is the landmark restaurant on Fergusson College Road which serves the best and tastiest SPDP in the world – no doubt about it…!
 
And talking about taste, do you know how many basic tastes there are…?
 
“Four…!” you will rattle out.

And you will proudly tell me as if you were a know-it-all: “Sweet, Sour, Salty, Bitter.”
 
Well, my dear reader, you are wrong…

There are five primary tastes – Sweet, Sour, Salt, Bitter, and Umami.
 
Umami…?

You have never heard of it…?

Well I can tell you one thing: “Besides being a lost case, you are no ardent foodie for sure…!”
 
Umami is the unique tingling ‘savouriness’ or ‘deliciousness’ of Oriental Cuisines.

Well let’s forget all that mumbo-jumbo. 

If you really want to know what Umami is, just go down to Vaishali, order an SPDP, gently put a portion in your mouth.

Then close your eyes, roll the delectable SPDP till it dissolves on your tongue.

You will experience the taste of Umami.
 
Now talking of rolling the SPDP on your tongue – have you noticed that as you roll your food on your tongue its taste changes and flavour varies as the food interacts with different regions of your tongue…?

Does food taste different as you roll it on your tongue at different places?

The ‘Tongue Map’ – have you ever heard of it…?
 
You haven’t…?

Don’t tell me you haven’t heard of the Tongue Map…?

Hey, you are a real dumbo, aren’t you…?

Then try this yummy scrummy mouth-watering experiment.

Take some spicy chatpatta stuff, like Bhel, Chaat, or SPDP, and put some on your tongue.

Never heard of these things…?

I knew it.

But not to worry, it doesn’t matter. 

Relax. 

It’s okay. 

It just doesn’t matter…!

You can discover the taste of Umami.

You can do this eating experiment with Chopsuey – yes, yes, the usual American Chopsuey you get at these ubiquitous Chinese eateries proliferating like hobgoblins all over the place.

Close your eyes.

Yes, you must close your eyes to heighten your awareness, your mindfulness.

Now focus inwards to accentuate your gustatory, kinaesthetic and olfactory sensations, and gently press the rich juicy scrumptious Chopsuey against your palate with the tip of your tongue.

It tastes heavenly doesn’t it…?

That’s Umami…yes… the taste you are experiencing is called UMAMI…!
 
Now slowly roll the chopsuey backwards to the right side of your tongue and notice how its sweetness enhances.

Then move the chopsuey towards the back of your tongue and relish the tangy sweetish-sourness, the inimitable sweet and sour flavour.

Then roll it to the left, towards the back of your tongue, and experience a tinge of delicious subtle bitter flavour.

And as you move the delectable melange forward on your tongue, towards the left side of your tongue, soak up the tingling vitalizing scrummy saltiness, till you once again experience the intense lip-smacking luscious flavoursome savouriness of Umami.
 
That’s exactly what I am doing here right now, sitting on a lovely rainy evening at my favourite table in Vaishali restaurant on Fergusson College road in Pune.

Dissolving exquisite tingling mouth-watering portions of SPDP on my tongue, my eyes closed, senses focussed inwards, luxuriating in sheer epicurean bliss, trancelike ecstasy, epiphany…

Suddenly, unwittingly, on the spur of the moment, I open my eyes, and I am totally astonished, shocked out of my wits, baffled and dazed, to see her standing at the entrance.

Yes, it is her.
 
Instantaneously, I avert my eyes, try to hide myself in the SPDP in front of me, wishing, hoping against hope, hoping that it is not her, and slowly, furtively, with tremors of trepidation, I glance, through the corner of my eyes, a fleeting look, and my hopes are dashed, my worst fears come true, it is indeed her, no doubt about it.

And the delicious zesty SPDP turns tasteless in my mouth, like cud, and I wish the ground beneath me opens up and swallows me in. 
 
I wish she doesn’t see me, so I look away, try to hide.

I do not want to meet her.

Tell me, which loser wants to meet a winner?

Have you ever seen a failure attending a reunion? And enjoying it?

At this stage of my life, I avoid people who are more successful than me.

Is it not true?

The company of those who are less accomplished than you is always more comforting, at least for losers and “failures” like me.
 
Suddenly I sense she is near me.

Hesitantly, I look up.

We look at each other.

Priyamvada has blossomed. 

She looks exquisite, even more beautiful than before – radiant, slick, chic, booming with confidence – she is all the things that I am not.
 
“Hi, Praveen,” she says excitedly, “what a surprise…!”
 
“Yes,” I say nonchalantly.
 
“Hey, what’s the matter?  Are you not happy to see me…? Won’t you ask me to sit down…?” she says.
 
“Of course I am happy to see you. I’m sorry, but I was lost in my thoughts. Please do sit down and join me,” I say.
 
“Wow…! Having SPDP…? I too will have an SPDP,” she says cheerfully the moment she sits down opposite me.
 
“You like SPDP…?”
 
“I love it. SPDP in Vaishali – it brings back nostalgic memories too…!”
 
“Nostalgic memories…?”
 
“Vilas saw me for the first time right here – while I was having SPDP with my college gang.”
 
“So…?”
 
“He fell in love with me – love at first sight.”
 
“So…?”
 
“So he told his parents.”
 
“What…?”
 
“That he wanted to get married to me.”
 
“And…?”
 
“He told his parents that if at all he ever got married it would be to me and he will not marry anyone else.”

“Oh…”
 
“His parents were delighted as he had been rejecting marriage proposals for years, avoiding marriage on some pretext or the other. So they found out about me from my college and landed up at my place to ask for my hand in marriage.”
 
“And you jumped…?”
 
“Jumped…?”
 
“Yes, you jumped with joy at the golden opportunity. And you dumped me without a thought and you got married to a man twice your age…!”
 
“Twice my age…? What nonsense. Vilas wasn’t twice my age, he was just 30.”
 
“And you…? You were just a teenager then. Bloody cradle-snatcher…!”
 
“I wasn’t a teenager. I was 20.”
 
“It’s the same thing.”
 
“Praveen. Tell me, why are you still so bitter even today…? Just forget it…!”
 
“Forget it…? How can I forget it? You broke my heart.”
 
“Broke you heart…? I broke your heart…?”
 
“I was in love with you. We were in love with each other.”
 
“Love…? Come on, Praveen. It was just infatuation – one sided inchoate infatuation.”
 
“One sided infatuation…? I am sorry to hear that. I am really sorry to hear that. And then it was not only that. You made me the laughing stock of society. Not only me, my whole family…!”
 
“What do you mean?”
 
“You have the audacity to ask me ‘What do I mean’? You know what I mean!” I say.
 
“What?” she asks.
 
“You know how it was then. A boy rejecting a girl is okay, but a girl rejecting a boy? That too in Madiwale Colony – you can’t even imagine the unimaginable agony I suffered. I became the laughing stock of town – not me alone, our whole family had to suffer the embarrassment. I couldn’t even walk the streets peacefully without sensing those unspoken taunts and unseen jeers. It was terrible – really cruel of you…” I say.
 
“I am sorry. I did not mean to hurt you. But I never wanted to marry you,” she says.
 
“Then why did you say ‘yes’?” I ask.
 
“I don’t know. My parents were in a hurry. They showed me your photograph – it was all so confusing,” she says taking a sip of water, “Please let’s talk something else.”
 
“No. I want to know why you ditched me for that richie-rich IT Czar tycoon. Was it just the money? Or was it the lure of a luxurious life in America?”

“See, you cannot accuse me of ditching you – we were not formally engaged – I had just informally said ‘yes – I like you’ to my parents – and then Vilas proposed to me…”

“And it was his money, and he being an NRI from America, that settled the issue, and you dumped me.”
 
“No. It’s not that. You were too mediocre,” she says.
 
“Mediocre…? I had passed out from an IIT…!” I protest.
 
“So what…? Remember when I asked you what your plans were…and do you know what you said…? The way you told me your philosophy of life…” she says.
 
“Philosophy of life…? I think I just said that I never plan anything, that I just flow along, and take life as it comes…” I say.
 
Priyamvada looks at me and says: “Oh yes, just flow along. No ambitions. No aspirations. No dreams. No desire to achieve anything in life. Well I always wanted to get out of the middle class, have success, prosperity, see the world, enjoy the good things in life, and not spend my entire life going nowhere with an apathetic husband like you with no plans in life, listening to sermons on thrift and frugality.” 

Priyamvada pauses for a moment – and then she continues speaking, “I am so sorry – but in life one has to be rational – isn’t it…? One has to have plans in life.”
 
“Oh, yes. Plans in life…!” I say caustically, “And looking at you it’s evident that all your plans seem to have worked pretty well…”
 
I stop speaking at once, for seeing the sudden transformation in the expression on her face I instantly know that I have said something terribly wrong. 

She does not want me to see the tears well up in her eyes.

So she looks down into her plate and she tries to eat.

For some time there is silence. 

Grotesque silence. 

Then she looks up and says, “My plans did not work out.”

“What…???” I look at her dumbstruck.

“I have left him. Vilas and me are divorced. I have come back to India for good. I was wrong. I did not belong there. I realized I still belong here,” Priyamvada says.

She pauses for a moment.

Priyamvada composes herself, and then she says, “And this SPDP is no coincidence – I contrived the coincidence. I knew you would be here in Vaishali at six in the evening after spending your Sunday afternoon reading in the library.”

“What? You came here to meet me? Why?” I ask.

“Praveen, I want to ask you something,” she says.

“I know what you want to ask me – and my answer is YES,” I say looking deep into her eyes.

Priyamvada looks lovingly at me, and she says, “Thank you.” 

“I knew you would come back to me. I was waiting for you to come back,” I say.

I pop some SPDP in my mouth.

I let it disintegrate on my tongue and savour the delicious zesty Umami taste – the SPDP tastes delicious and I relish the lipsmacking dish like I have never relished it before.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
This Story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


This story written by me Vikram Karve in 2006 and 2009 and earlier posted by me online in my blogs at urls: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…  and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 

blogspot.in

4/29/2015 01:40:00 PM

How to Solve OROP Problem – Integrated Pay Scale will eliminate need for One Rank One Pension

April 29, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: OROP IMBROGLIO – Simple Solution – HOW TO MAKE THE “OROP” PROBLEM DISAPPEAR.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

OROP IMBROGLIO – Simple Solution

HOW TO MAKE THE OROP PROBLEM DISAPPEAR
Ramblings of a Military Veteran
By
VIKRAM KARVE

In the Armed Forces – pay has traditionally been linked to rank.

In the 1980’s – the Armed Forces appreciated that it was not practicable to enhance the percentage of higher ranks given the steep pyramid hierarchy required for command and control in the Defence Services.

This meant that very few could be promoted to higher ranks – and most officers would be “passed over” and superseded for promotion and would retire at lower ranks (and at a younger age too).

Supersession is a fact of life in the Armed Forces.

And – since pay and pension was linked to rank – most officers are at a great monetary disadvantage for no fault of theirs.

In order to mitigate this – the 4th Pay Commission introduced the “Integrated Pay Scale” upto the Rank of Brigadier (Running Pay Band from 2nd/Lt to Brigadier: 2300 – 100 – 5100).

This “integrated pay scale” (or “running pay band”) worked well to give equitable pay to superseded officers and, to a certain extent, it helped mitigate the loss of morale due to supersession.

It is understood that the Defence Services had proposed to extend this “integrated pay scale” concept to all ranks right upto the top ranks of General/Admiral/Air Chief Marshal.

However, going by some specious logic, the 5th Pay Commission abolished this “running pay band” concept altogether – and we were back to square one where your rank determined your pay.

While abolishing this excellent “integrated pay scale” concept – the Pay Commission rubbed salt in the wounds of superseded officers by not giving Armed Forces the benefits of the Assured Career Progression (ACP) and Non-Functional Upgradation (NFU/NFFU) which were enjoyed by the civil services.

Since pension is based on “last pay drawn” – the problem of OROP will disappear of the concept of “integrated pay scale” is re-introduced for the Armed Forces.

The “integrated pay scale” can be applied with retrospective effect.

As per the “running pay band” – your Retirement Pay will be determined by your total years of service – which in turn will determine your pension.

This is a fair, ethical and equitable concept – rather than linking pension to rank alone.

“One Rank One Pension” (OROP) concept is unfair – since it links Pension to Rank.

OROP will mainly benefit High Ranking Officers.

Should “length of service” not be given more importance than rank while computing pension?

Who deserves more pension:– 

A Colonel with 35 years of service – or a Brigadier with 25 years of service…?

After retirement – financial needs are the same for military veterans.

It is logical, equitable and ethical to give pay and pension based on the years of active service rendered in the armed forces.

If the “integrated pay scale” concept of 4th Pay Commission is implemented by 7th Pay Commission for the Armed Forces – and given retrospective effect for the purpose of computing pension – then the OROP issue will automatically be solved – and also – it will be fair and equitable to all retired military veterans including superseded officers.

So – the simplest solution and panacea for the OROP imbroglio is to re-introduce the “integrated pay scale” concept of 4th Pay Commission.

If government wants the OROP problem to disappear – then all the government has to do is to re-introduce the “running pay band” concept of 4th Pay Commission for the Armed Forces in the 7th Pay Commission and give retrospective effect for the purpose of computing pension of defence personnel and military veterans.

Do you agree?

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Posted by Vikram Karve at 4/29/2015 10:26:00 AM

Humor in Uniform – Do Senior “Fauji” Officers “Walk The Talk”?

April 27, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: Humor in Uniform – SUPERSESSION SHOCK.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

PROMOTION SUPERSESSION and CAREERISM IN THE DEFENCE SERVICES

Humour in Uniform

SUPERSESSION SHOCK

NB:

This story happened many years ago, in the 1980’s, much before the 2006 AVS Cadre Review Bonanza.

Those days, there was a selection board for promotion from Lieutenant Commander to Commander rank after around 15/16/17 years of service.

Now – things are much better – and every officer automatically becomes a Commander in 13 years.

SUPERSESSION SHOCK
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Lieutenant Commander “X” was passed over for promotion to the rank of Commander.

This happened in the 1980s – much before the AVS Cadre Review 2006 – when – in the Navy – Commander was a Select List Rank – and only a selected few became Commanders.

Now – after AVS Cadre Review 2006 – 100% Officers are promoted to the rank of Commander (Lt Col/Wg Cdr) after 13 years of Service.

Now – a similiar situation of supersession can arise for promotion to the rank of Captain (Colonel/Group Captain) – and the agony of “passover” is delayed by one rank.

So – to come back to our story – the promotion board results were out – the Navy Promotion IG Signal was released – and the name of Lieutenant Commander “X” was missing from the “select list”.

Lieutenant Commander “X” was passed over for promotion to the rank of Commander.

“X” was devastated.

“X” was a typical service minded – ex Sainik School – ex National Defence Academy (NDA) Officer – the only world he knew was the “fauji” military world.

And since he had joined the Navy after NDA – the Navy was the “be-all and end-all” of his life.

For “X” – getting superseded for promotion was the “end of the world”.

It was extremely cruel for a devoted service minded officer like “X” to be told at the age of 35 that he was “useless” – and that it was the “end of the road” as far as his naval career was concerned.

Observing how badly supersession had affected “X” – the Captain called all officers to the wardroom – and in our presence – the Captain gave an inspirational “pep talk” to “X”.

“Come on, cheer up. What is there in a promotion? The Navy is not everything. Your career is not the “be-all and end-all” of your life There are so many other aspects to life. Your career is just one small part of your life. And just because you are superseded does not mean you are not a good officer. There are just not enough vacancies. You must take it in your stride in the right spirit and keep working with full josh. Even as a superseded officer you can contribute…blah blah blah…and you can take up a second innings in the civvy street too – so many ex-navy officers have succeeded in their civilian careers…you must put the past behind you and move on…blah blah blah…” the Captain went on and on with his platitudinous sermon trying to console Lieutenant Commander “X” who seemed heartbroken and inconsolable.

“X” wanted to put up a representation against his supersession – but the Captain said to him: “There is no point fighting the system. You must accept your destiny with grace…blah blah blah…”

And then the Captain continued to pontificate – uttering the usual platitudes of consolation and rhetoric of motivation.

But “X” was so heartbroken – that he was not convinced by the Captain’s comforting words.

“X” wanted to quit the navy there and then – because he did not want to suffer the ignominy of serving under his juniors.

However – his friends and his wife convinced him to hang on for at least 5 years more till he completed the minimum 20 years required for getting a pension.

“X” stuck on for 5 more years in the navy – serving in insignificant appointments specifically meant for those officers who had “fallen by the wayside” and were considered to be “superseded deadwood”.

The moment “X” completed 20 years of service – he quit the Navy.

Meanwhile – the Captain did well in service – and in due course he was promoted to the Flag Rank of Rear Admiral.

Yes – the Captain got promoted – but it was strange and ironic – that hardly any officer from his ship got promoted – even his Heads of Department – the XO, EO and LO – were passed over for promotion.

Yes – everyone on the ship had missed their promotions – but the Captain had become a Rear Admiral.

After a few years – one morning – I suddenly met “X” in the INCS Canteen.

I took him over to the club – and we sat down for a glass of beer and talked of old times.

“X” told me that he had got a good job in the corporate sector – and that he was doing well in civilian life.

“X” looked at me and said: “Our Captain was right – promotion is not everything. There are so many aspects to life. I was unnecessarily so upset that I did not get promoted.”

Suddenly an ex-shipmate from the same ship came into the bar – and the moment he saw us – he joined us.

He had come on Temporary Duty from Delhi.

Our ex-Captain had been posted to Delhi – so “X” asked him: “So – how is our old man – our ex-Captain – I heard that he is a Rear Admiral now.”

“He is bad shape…” the officer said.

“He is in bad shape…? What happened to him..?” we asked.

“Don’t you know how desperate he was to get promoted…? He was so ambitious that he even wanted to be the Chief. Unfortunately – he missed his promotion to Vice Admiral – and the shock of being passed over for promotion has driven him crazy…” the officer from Delhi said.

“What…? It seems as if the “Supersession Shock” has driven him crazy…?” we asked.

“Yes – the moment he came to know that he had been superseded for promotion – he went berserk – he put up representations, statutory complaints, fought court cases – in fact – he is still fighting the system – and he has become very bitter and depressed…” the officer from Delhi said.

“That is strange. When I missed my promotion to Commander – I remember him consoling me and telling me that an officer must accept supersession with grace – and that there is no point in fighting the system. And now – he is fighting the system – and it looks like he has not accepted his own supersession with grace…” my friend “X” said. 

“No. No…” the officer from Delhi said, “His supersession has affected him so badly that not only has he gone mentally crazy and become extremely depressed and bitter – but even his health has been badly affected…”.

“Health…?” we asked.

“Yes – he had a severe heart attack a few days ago – and he is still in hospital. Now – with a low medical category – it is certainly the end of the road as far as his Naval Career is concerned…”

Retired Lieutenant Commander “X” looked at us and he said, “Our ex-Captain is a funny guy – isn’t he…? When I was passed over for promotion – he gave me such a good “pep talk” – and I “walked his talk” – and here I am doing well in life – but when supersession happened to him – he could not “walk his own talk” – and he has landed up having a heart attack…”

“Yes…” the Officer from Delhi said, “It is easy to “talk” – but difficult to “walk the talk” – especially for these senior officers – who become more and more ambitious – as they climb the promotion ladder…”

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Revised Extract of my Blog Posts earlier First Posted by me Vikram Karve in my blog at 2/06/2014 01:49:00 PM titled CONSOLATION at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201… and   ASSURED CAREER PROGRESSION Posted by Vikram Karve at 10/04/2014 06:22:00 PM at url: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 4/27/2015 11:04:00 AM

“SUNDAY ROUTINE” – LEISURE MANAGEMENT NAVY STYLE – “SUNDAY ROUTINE” – Unforgettable Memories of My Wonderful Life in the Navy

April 26, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: LEISURE MANAGEMENT NAVY STYLE – “SUNDAY ROUTINE” – A “Memoir”.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Unforgettable Memories of My Wonderful Life in the Navy

LEISURE MANAGEMENT NAVY STYLE
“SUNDAY ROUTINE”
A Memoir
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Today is Sunday.

Out here – in Pune – it is a bright Sunday Morning – and it is already getting hot – since we are in the midst of a blistering summer.

Sitting indoors on this sweltering hot Sunday Morning makes me hark back to my halcyon Navy Days – and remember my “Sunday Routines” in the Navy.

Once you retire – every day is a “Sunday Routine”.

But when we were in the Navy – and our ship was tied alongside in harbour – we looked forward to our Sundays – to enjoy what the Navy calls “Sunday Routine” – our well deserved leisure time.

Let me tell you about a few of my typical “Sunday Routines”.

In the Navy – when you are at sea – you are on duty round-the-clock 24/7 – and there is no “holiday” – so there is no “Sunday Routine” in the true sense.

But when your ship is in harbour – you have “make-and-mend” (half day) on Wednesdays and Saturdays – and a “Sunday Routine” on Sundays and Holidays.

Unlike the corporate sector and government civilian babus – an operational organisation like the navy does not have the luxury of a “5 Day Week” – so we worked 6 days a week – and a weekly “off” only on Sundays – unless you were the “Officer of the Day” (OOD) – or you were put on some other “bum job” duty.

So – we eagerly waited for Sunday – and coveted our “Sunday Routine”.

“Sunday Routine” was our own personal time which we could spend as we liked – and we could do as we pleased.

Aristotle has wisely said: “The end of labour is to gain leisure”

We laboured the whole week to gain our “Sunday Routine” – and we were determined to enjoy our well earned leisure to the fullest.

Different individuals spend their leisure in different ways.

How you spend your leisure defines your persona.

There is a saying that if you want to find out the true character of a man – find out how he spends his leisure.

In the defence services – especially in the navy – how you spend your leisure mainly depends on where you are posted.

If you are lucky to be posted in a “maximum city” like Mumbai – there is a plethora of opportunities for enjoying your leisure.

On the other hand – if you are posted to a back-of-beyond remote desolate cantonment – your choices for spending your leisure are limited.

Let me describe to you – to compare and contrast – two typical Navy Style “Sunday Routines” – one in Mumbai – and one in Vizag – almost 10 years apart – both when I was posted on frontline warships – the first in the latter half of the 1970’s – and the second in the latter half of the 1980’s.


INS “XXX” (Harbour Sunday Routine – as an “in-living” officer)
[At Mumbai (then called Bombay) – end 1970’s]

This was the happiest time of my life.

It is great to be on a happy ship.

Ours was a frontline warship – the ship was new – the crew was good – we had a delightful wardroom with friendly officers – and the general atmosphere on the ship was harmonious.

The main reason for the ship being a “Happy Ship” was our Captain – who was a great guy. 

His credo was simple – all he demanded is that we do our jobs properly – and once we did that – we were free to do whatever we pleased.

(I have observed during my long service in the Navy – and in inter-service establishments – that – particularly in the defence services – much depends on the Commanding Officer (CO) – for creating a harmonious the atmosphere in a ship/unit – and a painful “killjoy” CO can make life miserable for all – like we saw on some other ships)

On a Sunday we woke up early.

(If you remember – I told you in an earlier article that I never had late nights on Saturdays – and I preferred to have my hangovers on working days).

Early in the morning – we crossed the gangway and went ashore.

Then we embarked on a long Sunday morning walk cum jog – walking out of Lion Gate, past Kalaghoda, crossing the Oval, past CCI, then onto Marine Drive to jog to Chowpatty – and back to Churchgate – where we picked up a copy of the Cole (for the day’s races) – followed by “chota hazri” at Stadium Restaurant.

Later – in the wardroom – we had a leisurely Sunday breakfast on board ship – of dosas and coffee – while “studying” the Cole – and the racing columns in the newspapers.

Ours was a wardroom of “punters”.

At around 10 or 10:30 we were off again – walking down to our favourite Stadium Restaurant Churchgate – for a brunch of sumptuous “Kheema Pav” followed by a cup of invigorating Irani Chai – while discussing our “forecasts” and “predictions” for the day’s races.

Then we caught a western railway local train to Mahalaxmi racecourse – so that we were well in time for the first race of the day – which began at noon – or sometimes a bit later at 12:30 or 1 o’clock in the afternoon.

(We took the precaution of buying a “return ticket” – for obvious reasons)

I loved going to the races. 

The atmosphere was electric – the bookie ring – the tote – the stands – the racecourse – the crowds – the excitement – the thrill – the horses – and – not to forget – the beautiful lady punters in their Sunday best – it was a thoroughly enjoyable Sunday afternoon.

In the evening – after a refreshing shower – and fortified with a generous quantity of Scotch and Soda – our hip flasks topped-up – we headed out again – for dinner and a late night movie – followed by midnight ice creams or milkshakes.

The restaurant where we went for dinner depended on our luck at the races – either Olympia or Bade Miyan (on a luckless day) – or Gaylord or Kamling (on a lucky day).

Even during the off-season – when there were no races – there was so much to do on a Sunday in a “maximum city” like Mumbai.

Like I said – those were the happiest days of my life – and my most enjoyable “Sunday Routines” too.

I thought these happy days would never end – but two years later – I was yanked off the ship, and posted to Jamnagar (as an instructor) – and it was still a big culture shock for me after my wonderful days in Mumbai.

I was familiar with the dreary place as a “student officer” – but it was a big disappointment – especially after my glorious days in Mumbai.

I suffered and endured almost one year in that horrible desolate place – almost becoming alcohol dependent – since the main leisure activity there was drinking Rum (while listening to old Hindi Songs on Urdu Service).

I escaped becoming an woebegone alcoholic by getting “selected” for the “prestigious” M. Tech. Course at IIT Delhi.

After two years of “paid holiday” – followed by two years in R&D – and then two more years on instructional duties at IAT Pune – and I was back on a frontline warship in Mumbai.

“Bombay days were back again” 

(Yes – Mumbai was still called Bombay in the late 1980s).

It was back to halcyon “Sunday Routine” days – I lived at Vasant Sagar in Churchgate – and for the first few months we had a great life.

As I was living it up – chanting “Happy Days are here again” – our luck ran out – and the base port of our ship was changed from Mumbai to Vizag (Visakhapatnam) – and we were off to the Eastern Seaboard.

I had been to Vizag only once on my earlier ship – but I did not see much of the Naval Base – since our ship was berthed on the iron ore jetty in the port trust – and we were in Vizag just for a day or so – and we spent our liberty hours ashore in the town.

But it seemed that – as far as Vizag town was concerned – nothing much had changed in the last 10 years.

As compared to Mumbai – Navy life Vizag was a big comedown – as you will realize – when you see how I spent my “Sunday Routine” at Vizag (Visakhapatnam)
 

INS “YYY” (Harbour Sunday Routine – as an “MLR” officer)
[Vizag (Visakhapatnam) – end 1980’s]

I was now married (MLR or “Money in Lieu of Ration” in Naval Jargon) – and I was living with my family in Naval Park Vizag.

Sunrise is early on the eastern seaboard – so I would get up at 5:30 on Sunday morning – and I would head for my Sunday morning super-long walk – up Dolphin’s Nose – down to Continental Beach – and then head back straight to the “Sunday Market” in the HSL complex near Scindia – and reach there by 7 – just as the market (haat) was opening up.

The entire naval community would be there at the “Sunday Market” – mostly ladies whose husbands are sleeping off their hangover – and some early riser husbands like me.

In Vizag – this Sunday Morning Market was a “must visit” since you lived far away from town in Naval Park – to pick up your weekly stock of vegetables, fruit and fish.

At around 8 – I returned home – I had a bath – we breakfasted on the idlis I had brought from the Sunday market – and at 9 o’clock – we all settled down before the TV set to watch the epic serial Ramayan.

(Later – when Ramayan was over – we would watch Mahabharat from 9 to 10 every Sunday morning).

Then we (self, wife and son) headed to the swimming pool – and spent an hour swimming and cooling off – and chitchatting with friends.

At 12 noon we were sitting in the makeshift club located in the parking lot of the officers’ mess for the Sunday afternoon Beer Biryani Tombola.

(Yes – in Vizag it was the rather prosaic and boring Tombola at the Navy Club – in lieu of thrilling and exciting Horse Racing at the Mahalaxmi Race Course which we enjoyed in Mumbai)

Then – I headed back home for a “beer and biryani induced siesta” –  which made me feel groggy.

In the evening – maybe we headed for town – full family of 3 on my Bajaj scooter – mostly accompanied by friends – and walked around Ramakrishna Beach – or maybe saw a movie at Jagdamba – followed by dinner at Daspalla.

Then we headed back home – and hit the sack.

Vizag was a big comedown from the glorious “Sunday Routines” of Mumbai.

One thing good in the Navy is that nothing is permanent.

So – 10 years later – in the year 2000 – I was back in Mumbai – and I enjoyed my “Sunday Routines” even better than before – since the Navy gave me a lovely house in Empress Court, opposite the Oval, in Churchgate.

What better location can you ask for in Mumbai – especially to enjoy your leisure? 


EPILOGUE

My best and most enjoyable “Sunday Routines” were in Mumbai (Bombay) and Delhi.

And the most lackluster and dreary Sunday Routines were in Jamnagar – arguably the worst place to be posted to – during my younger days in the Navy.

The Sunday Routines in places like Vizag, Kochi (Cochin) and Pune were somewhere middle-of-the-road – as I have described above.

In IAT Pune – on Sundays – we could go trekking up to Sinhagad or in the hills of Girinagar – or we would head for Pune City – to spend the day with our parents/relatives (Pune is my hometown).

How about you? 

How do you like to enjoy your Sundays?

And especially if you are a “fauji” – do tell us how you enjoyed your “Sunday Routines” in the “fauj” – in the army, the navy or the air force.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


This is a revised version of my article earlier posted online by me Vikram Karvein my academic and creative writing journal blog at 7/08/2014 11:30:00 PMat url: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Now Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 4/26/2015 10:06:00 AM

 

 

Changing Face of the “FAUJAN” (Military Wife) – Story of 4 “Fauji Memsahibs”

April 22, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: ARMY WIFE – THEN AND NOW : A TALE OF FOUR FAUJI MEMSAHIBS.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

THE NEW AGE “FAUJI MEMSAHIB”

Sometime back the Social Media was abuzz with news of a curious contretemps pertaining to AWWA (Army Wives Welfare Association) and this issue was reported in the media too (Link to report below):

Major’s wife threatens action for being forced to rehearse for a show

If you read the news report and peruse the numerous comments and views on the incident expressed by young army wives on the social media, especially twitter, it is evident the archaic feudal army social culture is not in sync with the aspirations of the new age army wife.

All this “humor out of uniform” reminded me of a blog post I had written a few months ago about the changing face of the “Fauji Memsahib”

I am posting the story once more for you to read:

ARMY WIFE – THEN AND NOW : A Tale of 4 “Fauji Memsahibs
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Story of 4 “Fauji Memsahibs”

ARMY WIFE NO. 1 – SHE HAD NO REGRET MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

1948   Army Bride

“There is a marriage proposal for you,” her parents say, the moment she returns home from college.

“I don’t want to get married,” she says.

“Do you want to remain a spinster all your life?” her mother asks.

“No. But let me finish my graduation. Then I’ll see,” she says.

“She has a point. Let her finish her graduation. It’s just a question of one year,” her father says.

“Yes, let me finish my graduation,” the girl says.

“What graduation? Your whole aim is to get married, isn’t it? The boy and his parents are not insisting on graduation. They saw you at the club last evening, they have liked you, the boy has liked you, and the proposal has come. And let me tell you one thing – you won’t find a more eligible bachelor than him. It will be top status match. He is an army officer and you know that army officers are in highest demand – he can get any girl he wants, and you will be very lucky to get a husband like him. We will all regret it if we let go an opportunity like this,” the mother says.

“Please don’t hurry me up. Let me meet the boy. I will talk to him. Maybe he will wait for one year till I finish my B.A. – maybe we can get engaged now and marry later,” the girl says.

“No. The boy cannot wait for one year. He has been selected to go abroad for a long training course in England. He is leaving next month and they want to get him married before he leaves so that he can take his wife along with him to England,” the mother says.

Her father interjects, “I have found out everything about the boy from my army friends. The boy is a fine officer and has a very bright future in the army. The family is very respectable and decent too. I think you should consider this proposal.”

Seeing the daughter confused, the mother says firmly, “Listen carefully. They want our answer by tonight – yes or no. There is bevy of girls lined up for him, so may girls are desperate to get married to him, and you will regret it all you life if you let this boy go.”

The girl nodded her acceptance.

He mother rang up the boy’s mother.

Next day, the boy and his parents came over to “see” the girl – notionally, the boy’s side still had the prerogative to “reject” the girl but then they had already seen her and liked her.

The girl got married to the army officer the next week. They went on a whirlwind honeymoon to Darjeeling, then to the army cantonment where the boy was posted, where there was a flurry of parties, and then they set sail for England.

The girl did not complete her graduation. There was no need for so much education – for she was going to be a full time army wife – a “memsahib”.

The girl did not regret her decision.

In fact, marrying an army officer was the best thing that happened to her.

Where else would she get the high status in society, the top quality lifestyle, and the comforts that she enjoyed as the wife of a General?

Yes, her husband had become a General and she was the “first lady” and she was proud to have contributed to his success as a perfect army wife.

She felt absolutely no regret that she had married an army officer.

In fact, marrying an army officer was the best decision of her life.


20 Years Later…


ARMY WIFE NO. 2 – SHE HAD A LITTLE BIT OF REGRET MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

1968   Army Bride

She was a budding lawyer with a lot of promise.

After her LL.B. she had begun her practice under the tutelage of a top-notch lawyer.

One day, she submitted her resignation and told him that she was giving up her law practice.

Her boss was aghast and demanded to know the reason for her inexplicable decision.

“Sir, I am getting married to an army officer,” she said.

“But why resign and give up your practice? You can continue to practice law even after marriage. You are so talented – you have a very bright future ahead of you – I am sure you will become a very successful lawyer and, who knows, you even may get the opportunity of being elevated as a judge,” he said.

“Sir, my husband will be posted all over as an army officer and I don’t want to live separately from him – in fact, he has made it quite clear that he wants me to accompany him wherever he goes,” she said, and quit her law career.

She enjoyed being an army wife, supporting her husband in his career, taking part in various social duties, the nomadic way of life, and cozy existence of cantonment life.

Later, as she saw that some of her classmates and erstwhile lawyer colleagues, who were much less accomplished than her, had become successful lawyers, and some had even become judges, and she felt a tinge of regret, for she had no identity of her own except that of being the wife of an army officer.

Yes, she did feel a bit of regret that she had married an army officer and sacrificed her own career.


20 Years Later…


ARMY WIFE NO. 3 – SHE HAD PLENTY OF REGRET FOR MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

1988   Army Bride

She was a qualified engineer who had specialized in computer and software engineering.

She got a job in the top pioneer software company and had settled down quickly in her career.

She got married to an army officer.

She had two choices:

Option 1

1. She could give up her career as a “Techie” and join her husband in the remote place where he was posted and then accompany him wherever he was posted. She realized that if she wanted to always be with her husband, as an army wife she would have to be either a homemaker or a teacher, the only feasible career in a cantonment.

Option 2

2. She could continue her career but have a “long distance marriage” with her army husband as he got posted all over.

She chose the second option. 

Yes, she chose Option 2 – she decided to pursue her career as a “Techie” and have a “long distance marriage”.

She did extremely well in her career.

Soon, she was way ahead of her “fauji” husband who was plodding along in the army.

In their entire married life, they spent just 3 years together when her husband managed a posting to her place of work.

Often, she felt lonely, as she missed her husband.

As she saw her fellow “techie couples” enjoy the bliss of married life, she was filled with regret that she was married only on paper.

Yes, she was married only on paper – in practice, her life was as if she was not married.

Loneliness proved corrosive for her army officer husband too, who took solace in alcohol.

Worse, the army officer husband developed an inferiority complex because his wife had done much better than him in life, career-success wise and money wise, as the prospects in the army were limited as compared to the software industry.

All this – the conjugal separation, her work pressures, compounded by her husband’s increasing melancholic attitude, took its toll on her too.

She regretted marrying an army officer.


20 Years Later…
                                                          

ARMY NOT-TO-BE-WIFE NO. 4 – SHE DID NOT WANT TO REGRET BY MARRYING AN ARMY OFFICER

2008   Not-to-be Army Bride

She was the ambitious daughter of an army officer – she was an “army brat”.

She studied economics from a premier college and then followed it up with an MBA from a top Business School, topping in both courses.

She had got a top-notch placement as an investment banker.

She was taken aback when her classmate from school suddenly proposed to her.

He was also an “army brat” who had joined the NDA as a cadet after school and was now an army officer.

The army officer told the investment banker that he was secretly in love with her and was waiting for her to finish her studies before he proposed.

“But I treated you as a friend,” she said.

“But for me you are much more than a friend – tell me – what’s wrong if we get married – we know each other since school,” he said.

“Are you crazy?” she said.

“Crazy? Why?” he asked.

“Why don’t you understand? You are just an army officer and I am an investment banker. I am out of your league now. Do you know the package I have been offered? In the army, I doubt you get even one-tenth of the salary and perks I get. See, don’t feel bad, but I have my dreams, my ambitions of making it real big – now I am heading for Hong Kong, after that I don’t know where I will go – so marrying an army officer just does not fit into my career plans – you understand, don’t you?” she told him, “I do not want to regret by marrying an army officer.”

The investment banker girl looked at the dejected army officer and said, “Will you mind if I give you some advice?”

“Go ahead,” the army officer said.

“If you want to be happy, you better find a wife within the army,” she said.

“What do you mean?” the army officer asked.

You should marry a female army officer. There are so many girls joining the army nowadays. So why don’t you find a bride in uniform – it will best for both of you.”

With these words she walked out his life.

So, the investment banker, the ambitious daughter of an army officer, the “army brat” – she did not want to regret by marrying an army officer.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This blog post is a is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)



Updated and Revised Version of my Article “THE CHANGING FACE OF THE ARMY WIFE” posted in my blog on 22 Jan 2014 First Posted by Vikram Karveat 01/22/2014 at url: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 8/10/2014 12:08:00 PM

Short Fiction Story – THE INTENSIVIST – Irony of Life or Quirk of Fate?

April 20, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: THE INTENSIVIST.

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

THE INTENSIVIST
A Short Story
By
VIKRAM KARVE

The doorbell rang.

It was my friend – the ‘intensivist’.

Now – I am sure you know that an ‘intensivist’ is a doctor who specializes in the care of critically ill patients – usually in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

My intensivist doctor friend was in-charge of the ICU of the best hospital in town.

“I need a drink,” my friend, the intensivist, said.

I poured him a drink – and I asked him, “everything okay?”

“A strange thing happened today,” he said.

“What?” I asked.

“Last week – around 6 days ago – two critically ill patients were admitted to the ICU – they were both put on ventilator – I will not bore you with details of their illness – but both of them had exactly the same symptoms – and both were in very bad shape – on the verge of death,” he said.

“Old…?”

“Yes – old men – both more than 80 years old…”

“The first patient had a continuous stream of visitors – relatives – friends – well-wishers – there was always a minimum of 3 people waiting on him round the clock – sometimes even more – he seemed to be very popular and loved by so many…”

“Really…?”

“His entire family – his children – his grandchildren – he even had a great-granddaughter – they were constantly by his side in the hospital – he loved them all so much – whenever I looked at him – I could see that he had a great desire to live – in fact – when I spoke to him when he was slightly better – he asked me for a quick discharge from hospital – because he wanted to go home to his family – yes – I could see that he desperately wanted to live – and the huge number of people who visited him – all  his well-wishers – they all wanted him to get better and live a long life…”

 And what about the second patient…?”

“I was about to tell you that – the second patient had no visitors – not a single person came to visit him in hospital for all these 7 days…”

“Not even a single visitor – how is that possible – does he not have any relatives, friends…?”

“He is a widower – and both his children are settled abroad in America…”

“He has no relatives over here…?”

“Apparently not – most of his folks seem to be dead – and the younger relatives are all settled abroad – well – he was living in one of those high-falutin old age homes…”

“That’s sad…”

“Yes – he was very lonely and depressed – he once spoke to me – and he told me that he wanted to die – that he did not want to live anymore…”

“What happened…? Did he die…?”

“No – he became better – and today we sent him out of the ICU into the general ward – it seems he may be discharged in a few days…”

“And the other patient – the old man with lots of visitors – what happened to him…?”

“He died this morning…”

“That’s sad – all his well-wishers must have been distressed…”

“Yes – there was a pall of gloom when we declared him dead – terrible scenes of sadness as his heartbroken family was overcome with sorrow – everyone was crying – grief-stricken, inconsolable…”

I saw tears well up in the eyes of my intensivist friend – so I said, “Come on – you are a doctor – you shouldn’t get so emotional…”

My intensivist friend looked at me and said, “It’s a strange irony, isn’t it…?”

“What…?”

“The man who wanted to live – he died. And the man who wanted to die – he survived – and he will continue to live the lonely unhappy life that he does not want to live…”

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
This story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.


Posted by Vikram Karve at 

blogspot.in

4/20/2015 11:58:00 AM

“FINGLISH” aka “FAUJI” ENGLISH – Humor in Uniform

April 19, 2015

Link to my original post in my Academic and Creative Writing Journal:
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Humour in Uniform

“FAUJI” ENGLISH aka “FINGLISH”
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

The word “unassuming” has a positive connotation.

“UNASSUMING” means MODEST.

Modesty is a virtue – and – for an Officer in the Defence Services – Modesty is considered an “Officer Like Quality”.

One of my friends – while rendering the performance appraisal of an officer – the Annual Confidential Report (ACR) – he wrote in the ‘pen picture’ column:

“…XXX is an unassuming officer…”

My friend was summoned by his boss (the Reviewing Officer or RO).

“There is a mismatch in this ACR – you have given very high points to the officer in performance rating column – but you have given him an adverse report in the ‘pen picture’ – you have written that “…XXX is an unassuming officer…” – you better rewrite the ACR – lower the points and get the officer’s signature on the adverse remark,” the boss said.

“Sir – ‘unassuming’ is not an adverse remark…” my friend said.

“Of course it is an adverse remark – ‘unassuming’ means that he does not ‘assume’ things – well – let me tell you that officers are supposed to assume things, take initiative, be innovative, have vision…”

“Sir – being ‘unassuming’ is a positive attribute – ‘unassuming’ means being ‘modest’ – being ‘down-to-earth – ‘humble’ and ‘unpretentious’ – being a ‘gentleman’ – and officers are supposed to be gentlemen – aren’t they…?” my friend said.

On hearing this – the boss glared at my friend and said, “Stop bullshitting me…”

“Sir – please ask your staff officer to get a dictionary – I will show you what ‘unassuming’ means…” my friend said.

“Are you trying to teach me English…?” the boss said.

“No – Sir.”

“Now listen to me – you may know what ‘unassuming’ means – I may understand what ‘unassuming’ means – but will those buggers up there understand…? Let me tell you that it will be considered as an adverse remark and this officer will be written off. Do you want to write off this officer – is he so bad that you want to finish off his career…?” the boss said.

“No – Sir – he is a very good officer…”

“Then please take back this ACR and write a fresh one – you can replace the word ‘unassuming’ with some standard term like ‘sincere’, ‘hardworking’ etc – which everyone understands easily…”

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Posted by Vikram Karve at 4/19/2015 11:48:00 AM

MAHARSHI KARVE (18 April 1868 – 09 Nov 1962) – His Life Story in His Own Words – Looking Back – Autobiography

April 17, 2015

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: MAHARSHI KARVE – His Life Story.

Article Link:  http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2015/04/bharat-ratna-maharshi-dhondo-keshav.html

Article also posted below for your convenience to read:

MAHARSHI KARVE
His Life Story in His Own Words

LOOKING BACK By DK KARVE (1936)

 
The Autobiography of Bharat Ratna Dhondo Keshav Karve
 
(Book Review by Vikram Waman Karve)
 
Tomorrow 18 April 2015 is the 157th Birth Anniversary of Bharat Ratna Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve (18.04.1858 – 09.11.1962).
 
I felt that, on this occasion, it would be apt to tell you about his life and work as written by him in his autobiography titled LOOKING BACK published in 1936.
 
Dear Reader, you must be wondering why I am reviewing an autobiography written in 1936.

Well, sometime back, for six years of my life, I stayed in a magnificent building called Empress Court on Maharshi Karve Road at Churchgate in Mumbai.

I share the same surname ( Karve ) as the author.

Also, I happen to be the great grandson of Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve. 

 
But, beyond that, compared to him I am a nobody – not even a pygmy.
 
Maharshi Karve clearly knew his goal, persisted ceaselessly throughout his life with missionary zeal and transformed the destiny of the Indian Woman.

The first university for women in India, SNDT University, and educational institutions for women under the aegis of the Hingne Stree Shiksan Samstha Poona, later renamed Maharshi Karve Stree Shikshan Samstha (MKSSS) Pune, covering the entire spectrum ranging from pre-primary schools to post-graduate, engineering, vocational and professional colleges bear eloquent testimony to his indomitable spirit, untiring perseverance and determined efforts.

 
In his preface, Frederick J Gould, renowned rationalist and lecturer on Ethics, writes that “the narrative is a parable of his career” – a most apt description of the autobiography. The author tells his life-story in a simple straightforward manner, with remarkable candour and humility; resulting in a narrative which is friendly, interesting and readable.
 
Autobiographies are sometimes voluminous tomes, but this a small book, 200 pages, and a very easy comfortable enjoyable read that makes it almost unputdownable.

Dr. Dhondo Keshav Karve writes a crisp, flowing narrative of his life, interspersed with his views and anecdotes, in simple, straightforward style which facilitates the reader to visualize through the author’s eyes the places, period, people and events pertaining to his life and times and the trials and tribulations he faced and struggled to conquer.

 
Dr. Dhondo Keshav Karve was born on 18th of April 1858. In the first few chapters he writes about Murud, his native place in Konkan, Maharashtra, his ancestry and his early life– the description is so vivid that you can clearly “see” through the author’s eye.
 
His struggle to appear in the public service examination (walking 110 miles in torrential rain and difficult terrain to Satara) and his shattering disappointment at not being allowed to appear for the examination (because “he looked too young”) make poignant reading.
 
“Many undreamt of things have happened in my life and given a different turn to my career” he writes, and then goes on to describe his high school and, later, college education at The Wilson College Bombay (Mumbai) narrating various incidents that convinced him of the role of destiny and serendipity in shaping his life and career as a teacher and then Professor of Mathematics.
 
He married at the age of fourteen but began his marital life at the age of twenty! 
 
This was the custom of those days. 
 
Let’s read the author’s own words on his domestic life:
 
 “… I was married at the age of fourteen and my wife was then eight. Her family lived very near to ours and we knew each other very well and had often played together. However after marriage we had to forget our old relation as playmates and to behave as strangers, often looking toward each other but never standing together to exchange words … We had to communicate with each other through my sister … My marital life began under the parental roof at Murud when I was twenty …” 
 
Their domestic bliss was short lived as his wife died after a few years leaving behind a son.
 
“Thus ended the first part of my domestic life”… he concludes in crisp witty style.
 
An incident highlighting the plight of a widow left an indelible impression on him and germinated in him the idea of widow remarriage.

He married Godubai, who was widowed when she was only eight years old, was a sister of his friend Mr. Joshi, and now twenty three was studying at Pandita Ramabai’s Sharada Sadan as its first widow student.

 
Let’s read in the author’s own words how he asked for her hand in marriage to her father – “I told him…..I had made up my mind to marry a widow. He sat silent for a minute and then hinted that there was no need to go in search of such a bride”.
 
He describes in detail the ostracism he faced from some orthodox quarters and systematically enunciates his life work – his organization of the Widow Marriage Association, Hindu Widows Home, Mahila Vidyalaya, Nishkama Karma Math, and other institutions, culminating in the birth of the first Indian Women’s University (SNDT University).
 
The trials and tribulations he faced in his life-work of emancipation of education of women (widows in particular) and how he overcame them by his persistent steadfast endeavours and indomitable spirit makes illuminating reading and underlines the fact that Dr. DK Karve was no arm-chair social reformer but a person devoted to achieve his dreams on the ground in reality.
 
These chapters form the meat of the book and make compelling reading. 
 
His dedication and meticulousness is evident in the appendices where he has given date-wise details of his engagements and subscriptions down to the paisa for his educational institutions from various places he visited around the world to propagate their cause.
 
He then describes his world tour, at the ripe age of 71, to meet eminent educationists to propagate the cause of the Women’s University, his later domestic life and ends with a few of his views and ideas for posterity. 
 
At the end of the book, concluding his autobiography, he writes:
 
“Here ends the story of my life. I hope this simple story will serve some useful purpose”.
 
Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve wrote this book in 1936. 
 
He lived on till the 9th of November 1962, achieving so much more on the way, and was conferred the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters ( D.Litt.) by the famous and prestigious Banaras Hindu University (BHU) Varanasi in 1942, followed by University of Poona [Pune] in 1951, SNDT Women’s University in 1955, and the LL.D. by Bombay [Mumbai] University in 1957.
 
Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve received the Padma Vibhushan in 1955 and the India’s highest honour the “Bharat Ratna” in 1958, a fitting tribute on his centenary at the glorious age of 100.
 
It is an engrossing and illuminating autobiography, written in simple witty readable storytelling style, and it clearly brings out the mammoth contribution of Maharshi Karve and the trials and tribulations he faced.
 
 
Epilogue
 
I was born in September 1956, and I have fleeting memories of my great grandfather Maharshi Karve, when I was a small boy, during our visits, till 1962, to Hingne Stree Shikshan Samstha (now called Maharshi Karve Stree Shikshan Samstha).

My mother tells me that I featured in a Films Division Documentary on him during his centenary celebrations in 1958.

 
Here is a picture of me with my great grandfather Maharshi Karve taken in the year 1958.
 
 

Vikram Waman Karve with Maharshi Karve (1958)

 
It is from some old timers, a few relatives and mainly from books that I learn of his pioneering work in transforming the destiny of the Indian Woman and I thought I should share this.
 
I have written this book review with the hope that some of us, particularly the students and alumni of SNDT University, Cummins College of Engineering for Women, SOFT, Karve Institute of Social Sciences and other educational institutions who owe their very genesis and existence to Maharshi Karve, are motivated to read about his stellar pioneering work and draw inspiration from his autobiography.
 
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this book review. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 
 
Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 
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