Naval Customs, Traditions and Punishments in IN & RN —-Cdr(Retd) Carl Gomes

December 17, 2014

Vikram Karve:

Very Useful

Originally posted on DESA Blog:

To open article please click on Link Below:-

Naval Customs &  tradition

Naval Customs, traditions and punishments in the IN and the RN

Customs and traditions are important factors in the growth and maintenance of naval esprit de corps. In many cases, they concern matters which cannot be adequately covered by official regulations nor,indeed, would it be appropriate for them to be dealt with in this way. Frequently the customs of the
Navy originated in the need to have a code of conduct to ensure that not only officers worked together harmoniously, but also that their relationship with the men under their command was properly governed. The following examples of naval ceremonies and phraseology will give the reader a brief
insight into this important part of naval life.

Crossing the line

To the average civilian, “crossing the line” means ‘overstepping the limit or boundary’; but to those familiar with…

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MILITARY MUST HAVE ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY FOR ABERRATIONS

December 3, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: ZERO TOLERANCE TO ABERRATIONS – Humor in Uniform.

HUMOUR IN UNIFORM
Zero Tolerance Policy for Aberrations

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

ZERO TOLERANCE TO ABERRATIONS
Incoherent Ramblings of a Retired Veteran
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

In recent times, I have noticed a rather curious verbiage which has entered military jargon and used quite routinely by “faujis” while interacting with the media.

Whenever something goes wrong in the Armed Forces, the standard response of “fauji” Senior Officers is: “This is an aberration”.

This catch-all excuse (aberration) is used widely to cover all sorts of misdemeanors, mishaps and unpleasant incidents involving military personnel including:

1. Scams and Corruption Cases.

2. Scandals like wife swapping, “stealing affections” and other acts of sexual misconduct and moral turpitude.

3. Unethical, Immoral and Criminal Acts.

4. Mishaps and Accidents.

5. Acts of Indiscipline, Misbehavior and Misconduct.

6. Personal Tragedies and Injustices like suicide, delays in payment or non-payment of dues and compensation to disabled soldiers and martyrs’ widows etc.

There is a scam involving senior officers – and pat comes the standard response: –“This is an aberration”.

There are news reports of indiscipline, of Officers and Soldiers getting involved in spats and clashes with each other, or military men indulging in brawls with civilians – and when asked about these acts of indiscipline, misbehavior and misconduct by men in uniform, the “fauji” spokesman says: “These are aberrations”.

From time to time, there appear media reports of various acts of moral turpitude – wife swapping allegations, accusations of stealing affections of brother officers’ wives, allegations of sodomy, sexual offences etc – and we get the same standard response from the Defence Authorities once again – yes, you guessed right: All these acts of moral turpitude are “aberrations”.

A ship sinks, there are mishaps involving submarines, aircrafts crash, there are other accidents involving military weapons and equipment – and we get the standard response: “This is an aberration”.

A soldier commits suicide; a martyr’s widow is made to run from pillar to post for a promised plot of land; a disabled soldier is deprived of his rightful compensation – yes, the authorities have their explanation ready: “This is an aberration”.

Every misdemeanor, every wrongdoing, every mishap, every accident, every lapse is covered by the catch-all term – ABERRATION

Aren’t these ubiquitous “aberrations” becoming a little too frequent?

Can a modern war-fighting system afford to have so many “aberrations”?

Isn’t it high time for the Defence Services to adopt a policy of ZERO TOLERANCE TO ABERRATIONS


VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Posted by Vikram Karve at 12/02/2014 03:14:00 PM

The New Age “Metrosexual” Naval Officer – SEA DOGS and SEA DOLLS – Humor in Uniform – A Spoof

November 23, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: Humor in Uniform – SEA DOGS and SEA DOLLS.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

HUMOUR IN UNIFORM

SEA DOGS and SEA DOLLS
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Disclaimer:
1. Please read this spoof only if you have a sense of humor. This article is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh. The terms “dog” and “doll” are used in a metaphorical sense.
2. This spoof is for mature adults only, so if you are a kid, or an overly gender sensitive type, please skip this post.
3. This spoof is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

SEA DOGS and SEA DOLLS – A Spoof by Vikram Karve

When I joined the Navy, in the 1970’s, I observed that there were two types of Naval Officers:

1. Sea Dogs

2. Sea Dolls

Now, before you jump the gun and accuse me of “gender insensitivity”, please note that the term “Sea Doll” is not being used for women naval officers – there were no women naval officers when I joined the navy, except a few “landlubber quack chicks” in the medical branch.

Even today, women naval officers adorn only “soft” shore billets and do not have to undergo the tough strenuous life of a naval officer on warships at sea, so maybe I will have to conjure up some other epithet (without the prefix “sea”) for these feminine landlubber ladies in white uniform.

I have digressed – so let me come back to the topic of “Sea Dogs and Sea Dolls”.

As a young naval officer, I realized that there are two navies within the navy:

1. The Operational Navy – comprising all aspects pertaining to warfighting at sea – warships, submarines, aircraft, the dockyards and various frontline units supporting the fleet..

2. The Ceremonial Navy – comprising all the “showmanship” activities like parades, fleet reviews, “shop windows”, events like navy week and navy ball, public shows, parties, social events et al…

Sea Dogs ran the “gristly, gritty and grimy” operational navy.

Sea Dolls ran the “spick and span” ceremonial navy.

Sea Dogs were rugged masculine looking men.

In contrast, Sea Dolls adorned the “fair and handsome” genteel “metrosexual” look.

Most Sea Dogs sported rough and tough “Full Set” Beards.

Sea Dolls preferred to have an elegant and pretty “clean-shaven” look.

There were some exceptions.

I have seen some clean-shaven non-bearded “Sea Dogs”.

But I have never seen a bearded “Sea Doll”.

Whether bearded or not, Sea Dogs preferred the natural look – a seaman’s robust grooming and robust brawny turn out.

Sea Dolls were obsessed with maintaining a suave polished appearance and chic glamorous turn out.

Sea Dogs were “tough cookies”.

Most Sea Dogs had an abrasive personality – like rough and tough sailors.

Sea Dolls were “smooth operators”.

All Sea Dolls had a pleasing personality – like slick charming corporate executives.

In earlier days, it was the “Sea Dogs” who dominated the senior ranks in the Navy – but gradually the tide seems to have turned in favour of the “Sea Dolls”.

I wonder whether the same applies to the Army and Air Force – and what are the equivalents of Sea Dogs and Sea Dolls.

By the way, have you read the classic military novel Catch-22 ?

Yes?

Then, let me give you a metaphorical example.

If “Catch 22” was a Navy Novel – a “Sea Dog” would be someone like the character of General Dreedle – and a “Sea Doll” would be someone like General Peckem.

If you have read Catch-22, you’ll understand what I mean.

I can go on and on about “Sea Dogs” and “Sea Dolls” till the cows come home – but by now, I am sure you have got the drift.

So, the next time you meet a Naval Officer – have some fun and amuse yourself – have a good look at the Navy Officer – and try to judge for yourself – whether he is a “Sea Dog” or a “Sea Doll”.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This post is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh. 
2. This article is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)
 



Posted by Vikram Karve at 11/22/2014 08:03:00 PM

CIVILIAN IN UNIFORM – “SUNDAY ROUTINE” – Unforgettable Memories of My Navy Life

November 23, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: “SUNDAY ROUTINE” – Unforgettable Memories of My Life in the Navy.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

“SUNDAY ROUTINE”
Unforgettable Memories of My Life in the Navy
By
VIKRAM KARVE

It is a bright Sunday Morning out here in Pune.

So, I think it will be apt to hark back to my halcyon Navy Days and tell you about the Navy “Sunday Routine”.

In the Navy, when you are at sea, you are on duty round-the-clock 24/7, and there is no “holiday” so there is no “Sunday Routine” in the true sense.

But when your ship is in harbour, you have “make-and-mend” (half day) on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and a “Sunday Routine” on Sundays and Holidays.

Unlike the corporate sector and government civilian babus, an operational organisation like the navy does not have the luxury of a “5 Day Week” – so we worked 6 days a week – and a weekly “off” only on Sundays – unless you were on OOD duty.

So, we eagerly waited for and coveted the “Sunday Routine”.

Once you retire, every day is a “Sunday Routine”.

But when we were in the Navy, and our ship was tied alongside in harbour, we looked forward to our Sundays, to enjoy what the Navy calls “Sunday Routine” – our well deserved leisure time.

“Sunday Routine” was our own personal time which we could spend as we liked and do as we pleased.

Aristotle has wisely said: “The end of labour is to gain leisure”

We laboured the whole week to gain our “Sunday Routine” and we were determined to enjoy our well earned leisure to the fullest.

Different individuals spend their leisure in different ways.

How you spend your leisure defines your persona.

If you want to find out the true character of a man, find out how he spends his leisure.

In the defence services, especially in the navy, how you spend your leisure mainly depends on where you are posted.

If you are lucky to be posted in a “maximum city” like Mumbai, there is a plethora of opportunities for enjoying your leisure.

On the other hand, if you are posted to a back-of-beyond remote desolate cantonment, your choices for spending your leisure are limited.

In Mumbai, you can enjoy the life of a “civilian in uniform” whereas military cantonments trap you into the straitjacket of “fauji” life, even on Sundays as avenues for leisure are limited.

Let me describe to you, to compare and contrast, two typical “Sunday Routines”, one in Mumbai, and one in Vizag, almost 10 years apart, both when I was posted on ships, the first in the latter half of the 1970’s and the second in the latter half of the 1980’s.


INS “XXX” (Harbour Sunday Routine – as an “in-living” officer)
Mumbai (then called Bombay) – end 1970’s

This was the happiest time of my life.

It is great to be on a happy ship.

Ours was a frontline warship – the ship was new, the crew was good, we had a delightful wardroom with friendly officers, and the general atmosphere on the ship was harmonious, and the main reason for all this was our Captain, who was a great guy. His credo was simple – all he demanded is that we do our jobs properly; beyond that, we were free to do whatever we pleased.

(I have observed during my long service in the navy and in inter-service establishments, that, particularly in the defence services, much depends on the Commanding Officer or the “Boss”, for creating a harmonious the atmosphere in a ship/unit)

On a Sunday we woke up early (remember I told you in an earlier article that I never had late nights on Saturdays and I preferred to have my hangovers on working days).

Then we embarked on a long Sunday morning walk cum jog – walking out of Lion Gate, past Kalaghoda, crossing the Oval, past CCI, then onto Marine Drive to jog to Chowpatty and back to Churchgate, where we picked up a copy of the Cole (for the day’s races).

Then, in the wardroom, we had a leisurely Sunday breakfast on board ship, of dosas and coffee, while “studying” the Cole and the racing columns in the newspapers.

Ours was a wardroom of “punters”.

At around 10 or 10:30 we were off again, walking down to our favourite Stadium Restaurant Churchgate, for a brunch of sumptuous “Kheema Pav” followed by a cup of invigorating Irani Chai, while discussing our “forecasts” and “predictions” for the day’s races.

Then we caught a local train to Mahalaxmi racecourse, so that we were well in time for the first race of the day, which began at noon, or sometimes a bit later at 12:30 or 1 o’clock in the afternoon.

(We took the precaution of buying a “return ticket” – for obvious reasons)

I loved going to the races. 

The atmosphere was electric – the bookie ring, the tote, the stands, the racecourse, the crowds, the excitement, the thrill – it was a thoroughly enjoyable Sunday afternoon.

In the evening, after a refreshing shower, and fortified with a generous quantity of Scotch and Soda, our hip flasks topped-up, we headed out again, for dinner and a late night movie followed by midnight ice creams or milkshakes.

Where we went for dinner depended on our luck at the races – either Olympia or Bade Miyan – or Gaylord or Kamling.

Even during the off-season, when there were no races, there was so much to do on a Sunday in a “maximum city” like Mumbai.

Like I said, those were the happiest days of my life, and my most enjoyable “Sunday Routines” too.

I thought these happy days would never end, but two years later, I was yanked off the ship, and posted to Jamnagar (as an instructor), and as I said, though I was familiar with the dreary place, it was still a big culture shock for me after my wonderful days in Mumbai.

After enduring a few months in that desolate place, almost becoming alcohol dependent, since the main leisure activity there was drinking Rum (while listening to old Hindi Songs on Urdu Service), I escaped by getting “selected” for a “prestigious” M. Tech. Course at IIT Delhi.

Two years of “paid holiday”, followed by two years in R&D, and then two years teaching at IAT Pune, and I was back on a frontline warship in Mumbai.

“Bombay days were back again”.

It was back to halcyon “Sunday Routine” days – I lived at Vasant Sagar in Churchgate – and for the first few months we had a great life.

As I was living it up, chanting “Happy Days are here again”, our luck ran out, and the base port of our ship was changed from Mumbai to Vizag, and we were off to the Eastern Seaboard.

I had been to Vizag only once on my earlier ship, but I did not see much of the Naval Base, since our ship was berthed on the iron ore jetty in the port trust, and we were there for just a day or so, and we spent our liberty hours ashore in the town.

But it seemed that, as far as the town was concerned, nothing much had changed in the last 10 years.

As compared to Mumbai, Vizag was a big comedown, as you will realize, when you see how I spent my “Sunday Routine” at Vizag (Visakhapatnam)
 

INS “YYY” (Harbour Sunday Routine – as an “MLR” officer)
Vizag (Visakhapatnam) – end 1980’s

I was now married (MLR or “Money in Lieu of Ration” in Naval Jargon) and living with my family in Naval Park Vizag.

Sunrise is early on the eastern seaboard, so I get up at 5:30 on Sunday morning and head for my Sunday morning super-long walk, up Dolphin’s Nose, down to Continental Beach, and then head back straight to the “Sunday Market” in the HSL complex near Scindia, reach there by 7 just as the market (haat) is opening up.

The entire naval community is there, mostly ladies whose husbands are sleeping off their hangover, and some early riser husbands like me.

In Vizag, this Sunday Morning Market is a “must visit” if you live far away from town in Naval Park, to pick up your weekly stock of vegetables, fruit and fish.

At around 8, I return home, I have a bath, we breakfast on the idlis I have brought from the Sunday market, and at 9 o’clock, we all settle down before the TV set to watch the epic serial Ramayan (later when Ramayan was over, we would watch Mahabharat from 9 to 10 every Sunday morning).

Then we (self, wife and son) head to the swimming pool and spend an hour swimming and cooling off and chitchatting with friends.

At 12 noon we are in the makeshift club located in the parking lot of the officers’ mess for the Sunday afternoon Beer Biryani Tombola.

(Yes, in Vizag it is Tombola at the Navy Club in lieu of Horse Racing at the Mahalaxmi Race Course which we enjoyed in Mumbai)

Then, I head back home for a “beer and biryani induced siesta”  which makes me feel groggy.

In the evening, maybe we head for town, full family of 3 on my Bajaj scooter, maybe accompanied by friends, and hang around Ramakrishna Beach, or maybe a movie at Jagdamba followed by dinner at Daspalla.

Then we head back home and hit the sack.

What a comedown from the glorious “Sunday Routines” of Mumbai.

One thing good in the Navy is that nothing is permanent.

So, 10 years later, in the year 2000, I am back in Mumbai, and now I enjoy my “Sunday Routines” even better than before, as the Navy gives me a lovely house in Empress Court, opposite the Oval, in Churchgate.

What better location can you ask for in Mumbai, especially to enjoy your leisure? 


EPILOGUE

I spent my most enjoyable “Sunday Routines” in Mumbai (Bombay) and Delhi.

And the most lackluster and dreary Sunday Routines were in Jamnagar, arguably the worst place to be posted to, during my younger days in the Navy.

The Sunday Routines in places like Vizag, Kochi (Cochin) and Pune were somewhere middle-of-the-road, as I have described above.

How about you? 

How do you like to enjoy your Sundays?

And especially if you are a “fauji”, do tell us how you enjoyed your “Sunday Routines” in the “fauj” – in the army, navy or air force.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


This is a re-post of my article First Posted by me Vikram Karve in my academic and creative writing journal blog at 7/08/2014 11:30:00 PM at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 11/23/2014 10:25:00 AM

 

IMMIGRATION – DEMOGRAPHIC EQUILIBRIUM AND SOCIAL HARMONY – THE FLOCK THEORY OF MIGRATION

November 21, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: IMMIGRATION – THRESHOLD LIMITS FOR DEMOGRAPHIC BALANCE AND SOCIAL EQUILIBRIUM – FLOCK THEORY OF MIGRATION.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

IMMIGRATION
THRESHOLD LIMITS FOR DEMOGRAPHIC EQUILIBRIUM AND SOCIAL HARMONY
Musings on THE FLOCK THEORY OF MIGRATION
By
VIKRAM KARVE

From my Blog Archives:

Immigration is a contentious issue.

Immigration can be legal and illegal.

Yes, for a variety of reasons, people migrate to other countries, both legally and illegally.

Is Migration good? 

Or is it bad? 

What are the consequences of immigration for the host country? 

Excessive immigration can cause demographic imbalance which may disturb social equilibrium.

When the number of immigrants becomes large, then in a democracy, the immigrants can influence the outcome of elections by becoming a “vote bank”. 

Immigration can be legal and illegal.

I have observed that for many bright youngsters in India, their cardinal objective in life is to migrate to America, get a Green Card, followed by US Citizenship, and permanently live in the USA all their lives and realize their American Dream. 

All over the world, people from less developed countries migrate to better developed countries, legally and illegally.

A few years ago I had written an article on The Flock Theory of Migration

Since the topic of “immigration” is back in the news, I thought it would be apt to post this article below, once again, for you to read. 

FLOCK THEORY OF MIGRATION – Food for Thought by Vikram Karve

BIRD-WATCHING – FLOCK OF MIGRATORY BIRDS

Long back, me and my friend, a Bird-Watcher, a self-styled ornithologist, were observing birds 

(I am referring to the “winged” variety of birds)

We saw a huge a flock of migratory birds flying in the sky.

It was a fascinating sight to see the flock of birds flying in perfect formation.

I mentioned this to my friend who then told me about the “flock theory” of migration.

He told me that sometimes different kinds of birds that do not belong to the original flock also join the flock and fly along.

The birds in the flock allow these “outsider” birds to fly along with the flock as long as they do not disturb the pattern, movement, flight speed and direction (course) of the flock.

When the number of “immigrant” birds is small, these “outsider” birds quietly assimilate themselves into the flock, obey the rules of the flock and do not disturb the harmony of the flock.

Sometimes the number of these “immigrant” birds increases to a sizeable proportion and they may disturb the harmony of the flock, if these “outsider” birds try to assert themselves.

These “foreigner” birds may even try to control the flock by trying to dominate and alter the flight pattern.

This disturbance in harmony and attempt at domination is not tolerated by the main flock of birds, and violent clashes break out as the main flock of birds tries to remove the “immigrant” birds from the flock – yes, the original birds in the flock try to throw out the “foreigner” birds out of the flock.


HUMAN MIGRATION

I think a similar hypothesis applies to human migration too.

When you migrate to another country (or when you relocate within your country to another state or city) you must remember this flock theory of migration.

Try to assimilate yourself into your new “host” country or city and acclimatize yourself to the way of life of your new place of residence.

You must mix around and interact with the local inhabitants and imbibe the indigenous culture of your new abode.

You must not “ghettoize” yourself by forming tightly-knit inward-looking groups of your own community but you must embrace the culture of your new land (after all, it is you who have chosen to migrate there).

Always remember that you are the foreigner in their land – you are the “guest” and they are your “hosts” – and a guest must never attempt to dominate the host and try to make the host a guest in his own country.

Yes, if you are an immigrant in another country, it is best to conduct yourself as a “guest” and adopt to the culture of your “hosts” rather than try to dominate and impose your culture on your “hosts”.

A large number of my relatives, classmates and friends have migrated to America and have lived there for many years.

However, I find that they mostly mingle among the Indian community (even language and state wise), as is evident from the photos they show us.

When I ask them why they do not have any American friends, they have no credible answer except saying that they do have such friendships, but at the workplace only.

However their children, born and brought up in the USA, have friendships, relationships and even marriages with resident Americans – in fact, Americans now comprise so many types and varieties of ethnicity 

Since over the years, so many persons from all parts of the world have migrated to the USA for a better life and now America has become the melting pot of diverse cultures.

The flock theory applies to all types of migration.


TYPES OF MIGRATION

Immigrants migrate due to a variety of reasons.

Some immigrants “choose” to migrate and willingly accept the majority culture of their host nation and are seamlessly assimilated and integrated into the existing society of their “hosts”.

Some immigrants are forced to migrate, due to a variety of reasons, including political and socio-economic imperatives, for education, or for reasons of safety and security arising from instability or warlike conditions in their homeland. 

These forced migrants are like “refugees”.

These “forced migrants” are less amenable to assimilating themselves with the majority population.

It is these “forced immigrants” who ghettoize themselves into communities and try to maintain their own distinct identity by refusing the absorb the culture of their new land.

Sometimes the numbers of such “refugee” forced immigrants may increase to a point where the immigrants may alter the demographic balance and try to impose their will on their hosts.

It is then that the “flock theory” will apply and a conflict will start and there will be a struggle for dominance.

When migration takes place, both the “hosts” (natives) and the “guests” (migrants) must remember the Flock Theory and ensure that cultural harmony is maintained and the demographic balance is not upset.


THRESHOLD LIMITS FOR MIGRATION – TO MAINTAIN DEMOGRAPHIC EQUILIBRIUM

My “bird-watcher” friend gave a ballpark figure of 30% when I asked him what was the flock theory threshold beyond which the harmony of the flock is disturbed.

Applying the same threshold to human migration, this tells us that the “hosts” must ensure that “guests” (immigrants) do not exceed 30% of the population, otherwise the “demographic equilibrium” gets disturbed.

Yes, in order to avoid social turbulence, migrants must not be allowed to exceed 30% of the population.

If this is allowed to happen and the 30% barrier is broken, and the number of immigrants keeps on increasing in an unabated manner two things may happen:

1. The migrants will become a sizeable proportion of the population and alter the demographic balance (and become a “votebank”). In a democracy, this may give the migrants undue power in governance and this loss of power to “outsiders” will be resented by the original inhabitants.

2. The “cultural visibility” of the migrants will become starkly evident and the original local residents will feel threatened and become insecure in their own land. Owing to their dominance, the migrants may try to impose their own ethnic, religious and social customs and try to change the original culture of the land and this cultural invasion will be resented by the original inhabitants.

The “flock theory” phenomenon is akin to the manner in which the harmony of the “flock” is disturbed and the original birds feel jeopardized because they fear that their “flock” will be being taken over by “outsider” birds.

The flock theory of migration teaches us the lesson that if migration is not controlled within acceptable limits, due to clash of cultures and a sense of insecurity, a stage will come when the migrants will not be welcome anymore and this will create dissonance and discord in society. 

This is because no one likes to be dominated by “outsiders” who try to impose their culture on the local inhabitants.

Remember: No “host” likes to be turned into a “guest” in his own home

Dear Reader:

Do you agree with the “flock theory of migration”?

Do you feel there should be threshold limits to immigration to avoid demographic equilibrium being disturbed?

Please comment and let us know your views.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)


Revised Version of Article First Posted by me Vikram Karve in my blog at10/12/2012 01:48:00 PM at url: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Re-Posted by Vikram Karve at 11/21/2014 02:57:00 PM

Mystery of AADHAAR Data Processing – Enrolled Twice But Still Waiting For My Aadhaar Card

November 5, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: AADHAAR – Enrolled Twice But Still Waiting For My Aadhaar Card.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

AADHAAR – Enrolled Twice But Still Waiting For My Aadhaar Card

If the new Government is serious about Aadhaar it needs to revamp UIDAI and make it accountable.

Here is my Aadhaar Story – I enrolled twice for my Aadhaar Card and on both occasions UIDAI bungled in data processing.

Despite repeated complaints for the past two years, there has been I have not received a satisfactory resolution from UIDAI and my Aadhaar Card has still not been delivered to me.

I am a Military Veteran, a citizen of India, with bonafide antecedents, but UIDAI refuses to give me a Aadhaar Card, whereas I have seen media reports of Aadhaar Cards being issued to illegal immigrants and foreigners who are not citizens of India.

The lackadaisical attitude of UIDAI pains me – maybe UIDAI feels it is not accountable to anyone.

I wrote this blog post in January 2014.

I am posting it once more for your perusal.

I want an Aadhaar Card.

I have made repeated efforts to get an Aadhaar Card.

I have enrolled, I have re-enrolled – but till today I have not received my Aadhaar Card.

My numerous complaints have not been satisfactorily resolved by the UIDAI.

Let me tell about my efforts to get an Aadhaar Card.


FIRST AADHAAR ENROLMENT

I first enrolled for Aadhaar on 08 February 2012 (08/02/2012).

The enrolment centre was located in a leading IT Software Company in Pune and Enrolment Agency was “Tera Software Ltd”

There was a big rush and I had to wait for more than 3 hours in a queue before I was enrolled.

I was issued an acknowledgement receipt with an enrolment number.

I did not receive my Aadhaar Card for over 6 months despite repeated reminders from my side.

On checking Aadhaar Status on the UIDAI website, the status would show: “Your Aadhaar Number is under generation”.

Suddenly, 10 months after enrolment, in November 2012, the status said: “Your Aadhaar enrolment could not be processed due to data process error. Please re-enroll yourself at the nearest enrolment centre”


SECOND AADHAAR RE – ENROLMENT

Accordingly, I re-enrolled myself for Aadhaar for a second time on 10 December 2012 (10/12/2012).

The Enrolment Centre was located in IDBI Bank Hinjewadi Pune and the Enrolment Agency was “Sreeven Infocom Limited”.

I explained to the lady enroller that my first Aadhaar enrolment had failed due to data process error and asked her to be extra careful and ensure that my data was collected properly.

The enroller took due care and confirmed to me that my biometric details had been recorded perfectly.

She also cross-checked my documents of Proof of Identity (PAN Card), Proof of Address (Electricity Bill in my name) and even took a Date of Birth proof document from me and attached photocopies of all these documents to the form which she was forwarding.

She assured me that I would receive my Aadhaar Card within 3 months.

I was issued an acknowledgement receipt with an enrolment number.

This time the Aadhaar enrolment acknowledgement form had additional comments like “Good Fingerprint Quality”, “Biometrics Captured Fingers (10) Iris (2) Face” etc.

I eagerly waited for my Aadhaar card.

Unfortunately, exactly the same sequence of events happened as had taken place during the first Aadhaar Enrolment.

For the first few months the status report said: “Your Aadhaar Number is under generation”.

After more than 6 months had elapsed, the Aadhaar status said: “Your Aadhaar enrolment could not be processed due to data process error. Please re-enroll yourself at the nearest enrolment centre”

Why was “data process error” occurring again and again?

What exactly are these “data processing errors” which were happening more than 6 months after enrolment?

I sent emails to UIDAI ( E-Mail id: help@uidai.gov.in ) and filled up online grievance redressal form, but I did not receive satisfactory response from UIDAI, and my case remains unresolved.

It seemed that things were moving in a circle and I was destined not to get an Aadhaar Card.


APATHETIC GRIEVANCE REDRESSAL SYSTEM OF UIDAI

It has been my experience that the UIDAI Grievance Redressal Mechanism is totally ineffective.

Since I am keen to get an Aadhaar Card and I do not want the same “data process error” to happen again and again, I made a number of complaints by email / helpline but did not receive any satisfactory response.

The only response to my complaints and grievances I received was a call from the UIDAI Mumbai Office that I should re-enroll once again (for the third time) and try my luck.

I asked the official: “This time can you please guarantee that that there will be no “data processing errors” and can you assure me that I will receive my Aadhaar Card?”

He laughed it off, saying: “Who can guarantee anything? The whole enrolment process has been outsourced to private companies. You re-enroll once more and try your luck. If your Aadhaar generation fails again, you keep trying again and again.”

This reply from UIDAI left me bewildered. I did not know whether to laugh or cry.

A few days ago, I discussed my Aadhaar woes with a friend of mine, who said matter-of-factly, “You have spent all your life in uniform serving in the Defence Services, so you don’t know anything about the outside world. In India, you cannot get anything done unless you pay a bribe.”

I was aghast.

“Do you have to pay a bribe for an Aadhaar Card?”

At first I did not believe my friend.

But then I read a news report that an Aadhaar enroller had been caught taking bribes for making Aadhaar Cards. 

What is worse, media has reported many such Aadhaar Scams where if you paid bribes you could get an Aadhaar Card made even without the necessary documents:

Cobrapost sting reveals Aadhaar fraud – Hindustan Times

https://aamjanata.com/cobrapost-…

Page on indiatimes.com

Aadhaar scam did not stop with kingpin – The Times of India

If corruption is rampant in the Aadhaar Enrolment System, it is no wonder that even illegal immigrants who are not citizens of India are being issued Aadhaar Cards, as frequent news reports say:

21 ILLEGAL BANGLADESHI IMMIGRANTS CAUGHT WITH AADHAAR CARDS

21 Illegal Bangladeshi immigrants caught with Aadhar and Voter Card

DO NOT ISSUE AADHAAR CARDS TO ILLEGALIMMIGRANTS, SUPREME COURT TELL GOVERNMENT

Don’t issue Aadhar cards to illegal immigrants, Supreme Court tells Centre


DO YOU HAVE TO PAY A BRIBE TO GET AADHAAR CARD?

The Government keeps saying that Aadhaar Card is voluntary.

But in actual fact they are making it compulsory by making Aadhaar mandatory for LPG subsidized cylinders and other requirements.

A retired defence officer told me that soon veteran armed forces ex-servicemen of the army navy and air force will not be able to avail medical treatment under ECHS unless they had an Aadhaar Card.

The more they make anything compulsory, the more the scope for corruption.

Will the virus of corruption infect the UIDAI Aadhaar System too?

The UIDAI was headed by Mr. Nandan Nilekani, a distinguished technocrat who has achieved outstanding success in the IT Industry (at the time of writing this article).

My repeated efforts at obtaining an Aadhaar Card in an honest manner have failed, so let me ask UIDAI a simple question: “Do I have to pay a bribe to get an Aadhaar Card?”

Now that the UIDAI is headless, I want to ask the same question to the new government?

Or will the UIDAI send me my Aadhaar Card at the earliest?

Sometimes I laugh at the irony of our system:

A Military Veteran, who is a bonafide citizen of India with impeccable antecedents, and who has served the nation in uniform for his entire career life, is denied an Aadhaar Card, while media reports that large numbers of illegal immigrants who are not citizens of India are being issued Aadhaar Cards

I do not know whether to laugh or cry at our system of governance.

Please give me “Aadhaar”  

AADHAAR as KYC – Is your personal and biometric data in safe custody?

November 5, 2014

Is Your AADHAAR Data Safe?

Is Linking Your AADHAAR Number at Various Places Safe?
Beware before you link Aadhaar Card to your Bank Account and give it as KYC to various entities and organisations
Is your personal and biometric data safe?
Or can it be misused?
Do you know who is the custodian of your Aadhaar Data?
Click url below and read the article:
You must think twice before you link your Aadhaar Card anywhere, to your bank accounts or or give your Aadhaar Number as KYC at various places – you need to do your due diligence, and satisfy yourself that your Aadhaar personal and biometric data will be kept in safe custody and not misused by unscrupulous elements.

THE LAST BATTLE OF A MILITARY VETERAN – A SOLDIER’S STORY

October 28, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: A SOLDIER’S LAST BATTLE – A STORY ON THE OCCASION OF INFANTRY DAY.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

A SOLDIER’S LAST BATTLE
Short Fiction – A STORY ON THE OCCASION OF INFANTRY DAY
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Prologue

This happened long back when I was in IAT Pune.

I saw army soldiers cutting grass and clearing up weeds and wild bushes on the campus.

I mentioned this to the OC Adm at tea time.

“These bloody civilian maalis (gardeners) are not doing their job properly, so we have decided to use service manpower to get the campus cleaned up before the VIP visit,” he said.

I was amazed.

Since the “powers-that-be” were finding it difficult to take effective charge of the indolent civilian gardeners and make them do their job properly, the easiest solution was to deploy obedient soldiers to get the job done.

“The civilian gardeners are being paid salaries, aren’t they? But since you can’t get them to do their job, they easiest option is to deploy soldiers – so why not deduct money from the lazy civilians’ salaries and give it to the soldiers?” I wanted to say, but I held my tongue, since it was of no use.

Of course, navy sailors and air force airmen were not deployed to cut grass.

Maybe in the early years of his service, the navy boss had probably seen the infamous“Topass Mutiny” of 1970 and so he decided to be prudent in detailing sailors for menial tasks like grass-cutting.

(The infamous  “Topass Mutiny”of 1970 occurred when some sailors in the Western Fleet refused to clean latrines, after the abolition of the Navy’s Topass branch. The Topass performs the more menial tasks for the crew. The Topass Mutiny led to the repeal of the unpopular decision to abolish the Topass branch)

And, of course, detailing air force airmen for menial tasks was unthinkable.

But the evergreen soldier was the “jack of all trades” and could be deployed anywhere and everywhere, to do anything and everything.

A few days later, the gardener attached to our department came to see me along with his brother.

His brother was a soldier in the infantry (army) and was in his mid 30’s.

The soldier was being released from the army at this young age.

He wanted my help in getting a job.

I helped him out – it just required a phone call to one of my classmates who was an entrepreneur.

I thought about it.

The civilian gardener was better off than his soldier brother.

Firstly, the civilian gardener would retire at the age of 60, when all his familial commitments were competed, unlike his soldier brother who was left to fend for himself in the “civvy street” in his mid 30’s when he had school going children to look after.

Secondly, with successive pay commissions, the “status” of the civilian gardener had been raised – “Class 4” had been abolished, and he was now in “Class 3” – and, accordingly, he got a higher pay scale too.

Thirdly, the civilian gardener would never be transferred and he would spend his entire 40 years career in IAT Pune. Besides stability for children’s education and a good family life, easy availability of housing advance for civilians enabled him build his own house in the village nearby and claim HRA (House Rent Allowance) thereby supplementing his income.

I realized that in case you want to join government service, it was better to be a civilian than a soldier, and this was applicable across the board.


It was this incident that sowed in my mind, the kernel of the fiction short story I wrote a few years later, which I am posting below, on the occasion on“Infantry Day”, with a hope that soldiers are treated better by society.

(67 years ago, on 27 October 1947, infantrymen from the 1st Battalion of the Sikh Regiment landed at Srinagar airfield in Kashmir valley to chase away Pakistani invaders. The enemy was thrown back and the valley was saved. It was the first glorious action undertaken by the Indian Army in the post independence era. Therefore, October 27 is celebrated as Infantry day throughout India)

So, dear reader, as an ode to the soldier on infantry day, let me pull out from my creative writing archives, a story I wrote almost two years ago, in January 2013, and post it once more for you to read:


THE PEN IS MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD – A Soldier’s Story byVikram Karve

The Soldier sat on the footpath near the gate of the Accounts Office.

Abe Langde … Hat Wahan Se (Hey you one-legged cripple … Move from there)” a street-food cart vendor said, “Yeh Meri Jagah Hai (This is my place).”

The soldier winced.

Then he looked down at his amputated leg.

Yes, he was indeed a cripple, a langda.

When he had joined the army he had two strong legs.

And now he had just one leg and one stump.

He picked up his crutch, pushed his body up and slowly hobbled a few steps away and was about to sit under a shady canopy near the street corner when a traffic policeman shouted, “Ae Bhikari … Wahan Mat Baith (Hey Beggar … don’t sit there).”

Main Bhikari Nahin Hoon … Main Fauji Hoon (I am not a beggar … I am a soldier),” protested the soldier.

Phir Border Pe Ja Kar Lad (Then go and fight on the border),” the policeman said with sarcasm.

Wahi to kar raha tha (That is what I was doing),” the soldier mumbled to himself.

As the soldier tottered on the street on his crutches he talked to himself. 

He had been a fool to be brave. 

He should have played safe. 

At least he wouldn’t have lost his leg. 

And he would not have been discharged from the army as medically unfit.

Now he was being made to run from pillar to post for his disability pension because just because some clerk had “misplaced” his documents.

The soldier was exasperated.

In the army he was expected to do everything promptly and properly in double-quick time.

But these civilians were just not bothered.

First the paperwork was delayed due to red tape.

Then there were some careless typographical errors in his papers and his documents had to be sent back for the necessary corrections.

And now his papers had been misplaced.

It was sad.

Nobody was bothered about his plight.

The civilian babus comfortably cocooned in their secure 9 to 5 five-day-week jobs were slack and indifferent and did not give a damn for the soldiers they were meant to serve.

Civilians expected soldiers to be loyal unto the grave without offering loyalty in return.

“What is the big deal if you lost a leg?” one cruel clerk had remarked mockingly, “You soldiers are paid to fight. And if you die, or get wounded, it is a part of your job. You knew the risks before you joined, didn’t you? If you wanted to live a safe life why did you become a soldier? You should have become a chaprassi (peon) like your friend.”

Tears rolled down the soldier’s cheek as he thought of this.

Others were not so cruel and heartless, but their sympathy was tinged with scorn.

Indeed, he should have become a chaprassi like his friend who was now helping him get his disability pension.

Both he and his friend had been selected for the post of peon in a government office.

But he had been a fool – he told everyone that it was below his dignity to work as a chaprassi and then he went to recruitment rally and joined the army as a soldier.

He made fun of his friend who took up the job of a peon and boasted with bloated pride about being a soldier.

And now the tables had turned and the peon was having the last laugh on the soldier.

The peon was secure in his job while the soldier was out on the street, crippled for life and begging for his pension.

And now his friend wasn’t even called a chaprassi – they had upgraded all “Class 4” to “Class 3” and his friend was now designated as “assistant”.

His friend would retire at the age of 60 after a safe, secure, easy, tension-free career without any transfers or hardships.

If a soldier got disabled, they would throw him out.

But if a civilian employee like his friend got disabled, they would never throw him out.

And, by chance, if his civilian friend died, his wife or son or daughter would get a job in his place.

Nothing like that for the soldier. 

A soldier had to fend for himself.

The soldier felt disheartened.

He looked at his amputated leg and he deeply regretted his decision to join the army.

Indeed he had made a mistake.

He would have been much better off as a peon, a chaprassi or in some other civilian job.

The soldier also felt a sense of guilt that he had made fun of his friend.

A few years ago, the soldier had laughed at his friend because he was a merechaprassi, a peon.

Today he was at his friend’s mercy.

The soldier had to live on the kindness of the man he had once ridiculed and scoffed at.

It was a terrible feeling.

More than six months had passed and he was still anxiously waiting for his pension and dues.

His friend had given the soldier, and his family, shelter and food. 

And now the peon friend was trying to help the soldier by running around from office to office using the “peon network” to trace the misplaced papers.

The soldier felt sorry for his hapless wife.

His ill-fated wife was at the mercy of his friend’s nasty wife who openly derided her and made her displeasure quite clear by making scathing comments about the soldier, his wife and their children.

His friend’s wife kept on complaining and making snide remarks about how they were sponging on her hospitality like parasites.

The soldier’s wife hated the peon’s wife but she had to suffer the humiliation in silence and bear the daily insults – it was terrible to be at the mercy of someone who detested you.

Today the friend had asked the soldier to stand outside the gate and gone into the accounts office alone.

He had gone in alone because last time the soldier had spoilt everything by refusing to a pay a bribe to the accounts officer.

The soldier had even threatened the accounts officer that he would report the matter.

The accounts officer was furious: “Go and report. Nothing will happen. Now I will see to it that your papers are not traced until you die. What do you bloody soldiers think? That you can threaten us? This is not the army. This is the accounts office. Haven’t you heard the saying that the pen is mightier than the sword – now I will show you.”

Today his friend had gone inside to negotiate.

The clerks had told him not to bring the soldier inside the office as the egoistic accounts officer may get furious on seeing the soldier and everything will be spoilt.

Once everything was “settled”, they would try and trace the “misplaced” documents and he could take them out to obtain the soldier’s signature and re-submit the papers for clearance of the disability pension.

The soldier waited anxiously in the hot sun for his friend to come out. 

Angry thoughts buzzed in his mind.

“Ungrateful, corrupt people – all these civilians,” the soldier muttered to himself, “we sacrifice our life and limb for their sake and they humiliate us, even ask me to pay a bribe to get my own disability pension.”

“Patriotism, heroism, idealism – no one bothers about these things anymore. I made a mistake by joining the army. Yes, I indeed made a mistake by joining the army. But I made an even bigger mistake trying to be brave. What was the point of showing courage, initiative, daring and going beyond the call of duty to nab those guys? How does it matter if a few militants sneak in? Who is bothered about these things anyway, especially out here in the city? They don’t even know what is happening out there. Had I looked the other way, no one would have known, and I would not be a one-legged cripple – a langda. And even then, I wish they had shot me in the head and I had died. That would have been better,” he mumbled to himself, feeling very bitter, frustrated and helpless.

The soldier thought of his wife, his children, the bleak future awaiting them.

How long would they have to be dependent on the mercy of his friend and his nasty wife?

He felt sad, very sad, as depressing thoughts of despondency and hopelessness filled his brain.

He wondered whether his disability pension problem would be solved today.

It was taking long – his friend had gone in at 10 AM and it was almost 12 noon now.

The sweltering summer sun was hot and the soldier felt parched and weak.

He had drunk just a cup of tea since they started their journey to the accounts office in the city by bus from their friend’s home in the distant suburbs early in the morning.

Suddenly the soldier felt faint, so he walked towards the compound wall of the accounts office, took support and slid down to sit on his haunches.

At 12:30 his friend emerged from the gates of the accounts office. 

He was happy – the bribe had been paid, the documents had been promptly traced. 

Now all he had to do was get the soldier’s signature on the papers and he had been assured that the soldier’s disability pension and all his dues would be given within a month.

He began to look around for the soldier and saw him sitting strangely, propped against the wall.

The soldier’s eyes were closed and it seemed that he had fallen asleep.

Something seemed amiss, so he briskly walked towards the soldier, bent down and touched the soldier’s shoulder.

The soldier fell down to his side.

The friend panicked. 

He thought the soldier had fainted so he started shouting for help.

The traffic policeman, the street-cart vendor and some passers-by rushed to help.

The policeman told the vendor to sprinkle some water on the soldier’s face but nothing happened.

The policeman rang up the police control room for an ambulance.

“I hope he is not dead,” the friend said with trepidation.

“I don’t know. But it looks like he is totally unconscious. What happened? Who is he? He was muttering that he is a fauji – is he really a soldier?” the policeman asked.

The friend told the policeman the soldier’s story – the full story.

“Sad,” the policeman said, “very sad – the way they treat our soldiers.”

The ambulance arrived.

A paramedic examined the soldier and said, “I think he is dead. We will take him to the hospital. There the doctors will examine him and officially pronounce him dead.”

The enemy’s bullets could not do what these babus did with their red tape. It is so sad. The enemy could not kill this brave soldier, but the thesebabus  killed him,” the policeman commented.

“Yes. The accounts officer was right,” the distraught friend said, “the pen is indeed mightier than the sword.”

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
This story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.



This Story First Posted by me Vikram Karve in my blog Academic and Creative Writing Journal onat 1/09/2013 02:09:00 PM (09 Jan 2013) at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

Posted by Vikram Karve at 10/27/2014 03:20:00 PM

FOOD TRAVEL BLOG – MOUTHWATERING MUMBAI MEMORIES – NALLI NIHARI in BHENDI BAZAAR

October 26, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: MUMBAI MEMORIES – FOOD WALKS – Part 1 – NALLI NIHARI at BHENDI BAZAAR.

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

MOUTHWATERING MUMBAI MEMORIES

I Spent the Six Best Years of My Life in Mumbai – 6 glorious years from the years 2000 to 2006

During these six best years of my life, I lived in EMPRESS COURT – my all time favourite home – the best house I have ever lived in during my entire life.

I wish I could have had my retirement home in that lovely neighbourhood, or nearby, but then, can an honest naval officer afford a house in South Mumbai?

Maybe a Merchant Navy Officer can afford a house in “So Bo” (South Bombay) – but if you have spent your life honestly serving the nation in the “Fauji” Indian Navy, forget about Mumbai, you will not be able to afford a home in the heart of Pune, and you would probably have to settle down in some faraway suburb like Wakad or Baner, or in one of those military veteran “ghettos” like Mundhwa, Kondhwa or Mohammadwadi.

But in your mind’s eye, you can always hark back and relive your “good old days” with nostalgia. 

That is what I did on this lovely Sunday morning – I reminisced about my glorious Sunday Morning “Food Walks” in Mumbai.

Let me tell you about my memorable Sunday mornings in Mumbai.

MUMBAI FOOD WALKS – Part 1

NALLI NIHARI at BHENDI BAZAAR
Mouthwatering Memories of an Early Morning Food Walk followed by a Sumptuous Nourishing Breakfast
By 
VIKRAM KARVE

From my Foodie Archives:

I love good food.

I am a foodie – I am certainly not a snobbish “high-falutin fine-dining foodie” – but I would rather describe myself as a simple Trencherman.

As I said, I love good food.

And I love walking around searching for good food. 

So, whenever I get an opportunity, I set off on my frequent “food walks” searching for good food.

It was in “maximum city” Mumbai that I enjoyed my best food walks.

Let me tell about one of my favourite food walks – a fulfilling early morning food walks culminating in a nourishing breakfast.
 
This is probably my first piece of Foodie Writing. 

I wrote this in the year 2000, more than 14 years ago, after returning from one of my food walks.

So, Dear Reader, here are some mouthwatering memories of a glorious early morning food-walk in Mumbai culminating in a wholesome breakfast.

EARLY MORNING FOOD WALK IN MUMBAI  a mouthwatering memoir by Vikram Karve

I start early, at dawn, from my house near Churchgate.

I admire, in the early morning pre-sunrise light, the impressive silhouettes of the magnificent Gothic structures of the High Court and Mumbai University across the Oval.

I hear the clock on Rajabai Tower strike 6.

I walk briskly past Oxford Bookstore, KC College and CCI towards Marine Plaza Hotel.

Then I cross the Marine Drive, turn right and start off towards Chowpatty.

I greet with a smile the morning joggers and walkers and rinse my lungs with the fresh invigorating sea breeze.

I walk briskly on Marine Drive. 

Soon I am past Marine Lines, Taraporewala Aquarium, Charni Road, Chowpatty, Wilson College and after the brisk vigorous walk of about 30 minutes I break out into a slight sweat as I reach the northern end of Marine Drive.
 
Here I ponder for a moment. 
 
Should I turn left up the Walkeshwar Road to Teen Batti and Banganga? 
 
Or should I turn right towards Babulnath?
 
Or should I turn back towards Nariman Point? 
 
I experience a sense of true freedom. 
 
I can make whatever choice I want and go wherever I desire. 
 
That’s freedom!
 
I choose to cross the road, and walk fast, straight up the steep path towards Hanging Gardens on Malabar Hill, trying to exercise my heart and lungs. 
 
I take a round of garden atop the water tank near Kamala Nehru Park (is it called Phirozeshah Mehta Udyan?). 
 
Then I canter down to Kemp’s Corner where I turn right, a U-turn really, past Crossword Bookstore, down Hughes Road.

I turn left past Gamdevi towards Nana Chowk and cross the railway over-bridge and keep going onto Grant Road past Novelty Cinema.

Then I turn right at Delhi Durbar on Falkland Road, reach VP Road, walk past Gol Deval, Alankar cinema and soon I am at Bhendi Bazar.

My destination Noor Mohammadi Hotel is right in front of me across Mohamedali Road.
 
Almost two hours of brisk walking has built up in me a voracious appetite and I am ready to devour a sumptuous breakfast. 
 
I am hungry. 

And I eat only when I am hungry.
 
I enter Noor Mohammadi Hotel, a Spartan no-nonsense eatery, and order aNalli Nihari and Roti. 
 
Within a minute a bowl of piping hot gravy, with a generous chunk of succulent meat floating in it, and a fluffy khaboosh roti is placed in front of me. 
 
I dip a piece of the soft roti in the spicy rich gravy, let it soak for a while, put it in my mouth and close my eyes to luxuriate in and relish the gastronomic experience in its entirety.
 
I can feel the juicy gravy soaked roti melting on my tongue, releasing its delicious flavours and spicy aroma which permeate into my soul. 
 
I am in seventh heaven and keep on attaining higher states of sheer heavenly bliss with every succulent bite of the mouth watering concoction.

They say it’s a bone marrow and wheat gravy, but I don’t delve too much on the contents of a dish.

It’s the taste, delicacy, eating experience and ultimate divine feeling of satiation that matters.
 
It is a delectable beginning to a delightful day as the luscious taste of the delicious Nalli Nihari lingers on my tongue indefinitely. 
 
Yes, it is epicurean satiation of the highest order – a blissful experience I can never forget.
 
Dear Reader, if you happen to be in Mumbai and are ready for a sumptuous non-vegetarian breakfast, take a brisk stimulating food walk early in the morning and begin your day with Nalli Nihari at Noor Mohammadi in Bhendi Bazar. 
 
I assure you it will be a fortifying and stimulating experience.
 
Don’t forget to tell us how you enjoyed the food-walking experience.
 
But remember one thing. 

If you want to truly appreciate this splendid Heritage Gourmet Trencherman’s Breakfast Dish to its fullest, you must build up an appetite for it.

Happy Walking. 

Happy Eating. 

Happy Food-Walking.

Remember, in order to enjoy your food first build up an appetite and then satiate it.

Yes, remember the FOOD-WALK DICTUM:

First build up an appetite and then satiate it

First – WALK WALK WALK

Then – EAT EAT EAT

Once more, let me wish you Happy Food-Walking

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.



Written by me Vikram Karve in the year 2000 and First Posted on my Foodie Blog by me Vikram Karve at url: http://creative.sulekha.com/heri…

Posted by Vikram Karve at 10/26/2014 02:08:00 PM

HOW TO ENJOY YOUR WORK – CAREER GUIDANCE – HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT JOB

October 25, 2014

Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: CAREER GUIDANCE – HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT JOB.

SELECTING A CAREER  –  GUIDANCE COUNSELLING

Link to my original post in my academic and creative writing journal: 
http://karvediat.blogspot.in/201…

CAREER GUIDANCE

More than 20 years ago, in the 1990s, I had written a number of articles on career guidance  in magazines/journals and given lectures to students on values based career selection, and subsequently posted these on my blog. This blog post is a revised, amalgamated and updated version of my article first posted by me Vikram Karve in my blog at 3/31/2008 03:22:00 PM at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2008/03/sense-of-values-your-values-and-your.html and my Career Guidance Lecture ppt on HOW TO SELECT A CAREER – A VALUES BASED APPROACH by me Vikram Karve and first postedby me Vikram Karve at 2/23/2009 08:14:00 PM in my blog at url:HOW TO SELECT YOUR CAREER – A Value Based Approach

HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT JOB
(A VALUES BASED APPROACH)
Career Guidance Tips
By
VIKRAM KARVE


One of the greatest misfortunes in life is to be good at something you do not like

You may be proficient in mathematics but you may hate mathematics.

You may be competent HR or PR Manager possessing excellent communication skills and busy interacting with people every minute of the day, but in your heart you may actually love a life of solitude and contemplation. 

In order to be able to select the right career, you will have to reflect, analyse, and discover your inner self.

This will enable you to be able to clearly distinguish between:

1.  what you are good at doing (proficiency, competence

and 

2. what you enjoy doing (interests, values). 

What you love to do is your true metier and is what you actually want to do in your life. 

When I was in school, in the 1960’s, there was no concept of career counselling or vocational guidance.

All the boys were herded into the Science Stream (unless one was very poor at mathematics).

And all the girls were considered suitable for Humanities (unless she put her foot down and insisted on studying science).

Then, as a boy, if you were in science and did well, the options were Engineering or Medicine, and most of us continued being good at something we did not like. 

The girls mostly studied arts while they waited to get married.

And much later in life we discovered what we truly liked and then, if we had time, we pursued what we really wanted to do (our true métier) as hobbies.  

Fortunately, nowadays things are different. 

Young persons have plenty of choice and opportunity to choose what they want to do.

If you are on the verge of choosing your career, the first thing to do is to develop a concept of the person you would like to be – introspect and try to discover your life orientation


LIFE ORIENTATION

If your want to enjoy your work take care to ensure that your choice of career is in alignment with your LIFE ORIENTATION.

Your life orientation comprises three factors:

1. SKILLS

2. INTERESTS 

3. VALUES

If you choose a career that enables you achieve success facilitating optimal utilization of your best skills, doing the kinds of work that relate to your favourite interests and in consonance with your core values, you will derive total work-life balance and job satisfaction.  

In order to find out your orientation in life you have to know yourself.

Go to some quiet place, sit down comfortably, close your eyes, and reflect on the aspects below to discover your skills, interests and values. 


SKILLS

As a first step to determining your Orientation in Life focus on the various skills you might have.

Introspect and list your SOFT SKILLS and HARD SKILLS. 

Soft Skills: pertain to the intuitive, creative and emotional right side of the brain.

Hard Skills: emanate from the analytic and logical left side of the brain.
Are you a Soft Skills person or a Hard Skills person or a hybrid blend of both?

Which types of skills predominate?

Think of your best skills.

Prioritize your skills, hard and soft, and make a list of all your skills in order of precedence. 


INTERESTS

Now list all your interests and put them in order of your preference, just as you did with skills.

How do you discover your interests?

Assume you have enough leisure and plenty of time and lots of resources – what would you do?

How you like to spend your leisure gives a clue to your interests.

Will the career you choose enable you to satisfy your interests at the workplace or will you have enough leisure and resources to pursue them on your own in your spare time.


VALUES 

Now, focus on discovering your values.

Values are core beliefs which guide and motivate attitudes and behaviour.

When you value something you want it (or want it to happen).  

Values are relatively permanent desires.

Values are our subjective reactions to the world around us.

Values are answers to the “why” question. 

You keep on asking yourself the “why” question until you reach a point where you no longer want something for the sake of something else. 

At this point you have arrived at a value.

Let’s take an example.

I was once teaching a Post Graduate Professional Programme at a premier university, a centre of excellence.

I asked a student, “Why are you doing this academic course?”  

“To gain qualifications,” he answered.  

“Why do you want to gain qualifications?”  

“To succeed in my career.”  

“Why do you want to succeed in your career?”  

“To reach the top.”  

“Why do you want to reach the top?”  

“To get power.”  

“Why do want do you want power?”  

“To control people,” he answered.  

“Why do you want to control people?”  

“I want to control people.”  

“Why?”  

“I like to control people.”  

“Why?”  

“Just for the sake of it – I like controlling people,” he said and repeated why questions elicited similar responses related to control.

Control for the sake of control – that’s when you discover your value.

I realized that control was one of his cardinal values and maybe he was a future megalomaniac in the making! 

The same line of questioning of persons undergoing higher education may reveal values like knowledgemoneystatusstandard of living,quality of lifeambition,achievementgrowthreputation,excellencefame.

Your personal list of values may include values like honesty, integrity, loyalty, prestige, happiness, friendship, family life, achievement, independence, education, power, money, independence, freedom and so on.

Now prioritize your values in order of importance to discover your CORE VALUES - your most important cardinal values.

Remember, there cannot be any “partial” values

For example: you cannot be 50% honest (half-honest) – either you are honest or you are not honest!

Your values are possibly the most important thing to consider when you are choosing a career, an occupation or workplace

That is because you can compromise your values but you cannot change your values. 

If you do not take your values into account when planning your career, there is a good chance you will dislike your work and therefore you will not enjoy your work.


SELECTING A CAREER

Introspect over your skills, interests and values.

If you have conscientiously created and prioritized your lists, you have learned something about yourself and ascertained your orientation in life.  

Whilst considering and selecting a career you must thoroughly evaluate as to what degree the career-attributes are compatible with your orientation in life.  

Let us see some examples:

CASE 1

Suppose your priority SKILLS include hard skills like mathematical and analytical ability, and soft skills like leadership and communication skills. 

Your INTERESTS include travel, adventure, photography and good food. 

And suppose your most important VALUES are family life, prestige andachievement.

Now let us consider various career options.

Consider a career as a deck officer in the merchant navy.

Your skills and interests seem to be ideally suited but there ismismatch, a conflict, between the demands of the career in the merchant navy and your most cherished core value – “Family Life”.

Perhaps, if your most important values were money, independence andprestige, the overall harmony and compatibility of your values, skillsand interests with the career-attributes would have made merchant navy an ideal career option for you.

CASE 2

Now, let us say that you discover that your three most predominant valuesare money, independence and prestige.
 
Will a military career as an army officer suit you?

Well, you will certainly enjoy much prestige as an army officer.

But, as far as money is concerned, the pay package in the army is quite modest.

Regimentation is the basic attribute of military life.

Since an army officer has to live a disciplined and regimented life, you may not be able to enjoy the amount of freedom you will get in the civilian world.


VALUES versus CAREER

In practical life you may not be always able to avoid value versus careerconflict in all cases.

But being aware of this fact will help you come to terms with realities and mitigate the conflict and also contemplate a career-shift in consonance with your value orientation whenever feasible.  

Your values are the most important and critical aspect of your career orientation.

If you want to enhance certain skills, you can work on it and acquire those skills.

Similarly, you can change your interests or develop new interests, devoting time and resources to those interests you would like to create, acquire or strengthen.

Skills can be learned, interests can be developed, but values are intrinsic.

It is very difficult to change your core values.

Remember: You may compromise your values, but you cannot change your values.


CAREER GUIDANCE

Before you choose your career, introspect and ascertain the compatibility, congruence and harmony between the career and your orientation in life (comprising your skills, interests and values). 

Do not make a hasty decision or you may find yourself on the wrong road and then it may be too late to turn back.

Devoid of intrinsic motivation to pursue a career which is not in harmony with your orientation in life, but caught up in the need to gain parental affection, materialistic rewards, extrinsic recognition, peer pressure and societal acceptance, young people often enter careers that may not offer them true inner happiness and fulfillment that evolves from harmonious work-life balance. 

Thus, though they may appear outwardly successful, inwardly they lament over the reality of inner dissonance owing to work-life imbalance.

Let your inner conscience be your guide and resist temptation and undue pressures from elders and peers.

Choosing a career which you love, and doing a job you enjoy which is not in conflict with your values and lets you realize your full individuality and creative potential will enable you to achieve a sense of fulfillment. 

Of course, you can interact with career counselors, you can talk to your parents, elders, peers and take their advice, but it is you yourself who must discover your own life orientation (skills, interests and values), and while doing so, remember to distinguish between the “hard” and the “soft” facets of career attributes.

Read some good books on career guidance.

My favorite is a book called What Color Is Your Parachute by Richard N. Bolles. It is updated and published every year. It is a fascinating read and will help you discover your true métier. 

And why not take a few career tests?

You can either visit a career guidance counsellor or psychologist who will administer relevant tests to you. Or try the online tests. My favorite one is ThePrinceton Review Career Quiz which is available online. 

It is a simple, fast, interesting and effective forced choice test which presents you with interesting career options.

I gave the test sometime ago, and the results say that my interest color is Blue, which means I am a creative, humanistic, thoughtful, quiet type, and my usual style is Yellow, which means I tend to be orderly, cautious, loyal, systematic, methodical, solitary, and organized and will thrive in a research-oriented, predictable, established, orderly environment.

As per the test results, my career choices include Writer, Librarian, Philosopher, Teacher, Professor, Researcher, College or School Administrator, Human Resources Manager, Guidance Counsellor, and, yes, I am supposed to be an ideal Career Counsellor.

Am I one of these? 

Well, I am not going to tell you.

I wish you all the best.


WHAT YOU ARE GOOD AT DOING versus WHAT YOU ENJOY DOING

After you have narrowed down the list of suitable careers in consonance with your life orientation, in the ultimate analysis, you have to distinguish betweenwhat you are good at doing and what you enjoy doing.

Have fun, introspect and learn more and more about your own self.

Take your time, think, discuss, read, experiment, reflect, and discover your true métier in harmony with your interests and values and inner self.

Choose your career wisely. 

Remember, one of the greatest misfortunes in life is to be good at something you do not like. 

So while selecting your career you must reflect, analyse, and you must be able to clearly distinguish between:

what you are good at doing (proficiency, competence)

as opposed to

what you enjoy doing (interests, valueswhat you love to do and what you want to do in life. 

If both match and you are good at doing what you enjoy doing, you are indeed very lucky.

But if you are not so lucky, then, while selecting your career, always try andgive more weightage to what you enjoy doing over what you are good at doing. 

A career can be very satisfying if you have made the right choice.

Like the famous adage that goes: 

If you choose a job you love then you will not have to work even a single day in your life.

On the other hand, a wrong decision can leave you regretting and wishing that you had trodden a different path.

All the Best in discovering your true métier

I wish you a fulfilling career that suits you and may you always have a job which you love.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. These career guidance tips are based on my personal experience. These tips do not constitute professional career guidance and are not a substitute for professional career counselling. Please do your own due diligence while selecting your career.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)



More than 20 years ago, in the 1990s, I had written a number of articles on career guidance and given lectures to students on values based career selection, and subsequently posted these on my blog. This blog post is a revised and updated version of my article first posted by me Vikram Karve in my blog at3/31/2008 03:22:00 PM at url: Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve and my Career Guidance Lecture ppt on HOW TO SELECT A CAREER – A VALUES BASED APPROACH by me Vikram Karve and first posted by me Vikram Karve at 2/23/2009 08:14:00 PM in my blog at url:http://karvediat.blogspot.in/200…



Posted by Vikram Karve at 8/25/2014 11:29:00 AM

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